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Publication numberUS2815823 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1957
Filing dateMar 2, 1953
Priority dateMar 2, 1953
Publication numberUS 2815823 A, US 2815823A, US-A-2815823, US2815823 A, US2815823A
InventorsJohn Preston, Olson Harry F
Original AssigneeRca Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loudspeaker structure
US 2815823 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. l0, 1957 H. F. OLSON Irl-Al. 2,815,823

LOUDSPEAKER STRUCTURE 2 Shees-S'neet l Filed March 2. 1953 BY I Dec. l0, 1957 H. F1 QLsoN ET AL, 2,815,823

LUDSPEKER STRUCTURE 2 Sheets-Sheet Filed March 2, 1953 Prec/fon f NNN MM ATTORNEY Unite 2,815,823 Patented Dec. 10, 1957 2,815,823 LOUDSPEAKER STRUCTURE Harry F. Olson, Princeton, and John Preston, Metedeconk, N. I., assignors to Radio Corporation of America, a corporation of Delaware Application March 2, 1953, Serial No. 339,809 8 Claims. (Cl. 181-32) This invention relates to .acoustics and more particularly to loudspeakers.

There has been developed and marketed a wide frequency range loudspeaker which is characterized in that the single speaker has a low frequency cone and a high frequency cone. The low frequency cone is truncated. The high frequency cone is arranged centrally of the larger, low frequency cone, constituting substantially a continuation of the conic surface of the larger cone. An example of such a speaker is known, commercially, as the RCA Duo-Cone. Although the speakers of the type give excellent results and have found wide acceptance on the market, it has been found that the response of the speaker in the range of 2500 to 8000 cycles/sec. was somewhat low. Signals in that frequency range are supplied by the high frequency or smaller cone. The output of a direct radiator loudspeaker can be increased by reducing the solid angle into which the speaker radiates. However, a symmetrical reduction of the solid angle, in the case of speakers of the type under consideration, would mean a reduction of the angle of the low frequency cone. Such an expedient would, obviously, impair the broad directivity pattern of the low frequency cone.

It is, accordingly, an object of the present invention to provide means for improving the output of the high frequency cone of a double-cone speaker without impairing the output of the low frequency cone.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved double cone, wide frequency range loudspeaker which is characterized in that the output of the high frequency cone is improved without impairing the output of the low frequency cone.

It has `also been noticed that slight dips occur at certain frequencies along the axis of the speaker. These dips, it Was determined by the present inventors, are caused, at least in part, by sound waves from the small, high-frequency speaker being reflected by the surface of the larger, low frequency speaker.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an improved double cone loudspeaker in which the foregoing difculty is overcome.

A still further object of this invention is to provide -an improved speaker as set forth in which the reflecting surface of the low frequency cone is broken up.

A further irregularity in the output of the speakers was noted with respect to the low frequency cone. The outer periphery of the large cone is supported by a corrugated annulus which provides a flexible connection between the cone and the usual fixed support. This corrugated annulus resonates at certain frequencies of operation of the large cone. Sometimes this resonant vibration is out of phase with the large cone and sometimes it is in phase with the vibration of the large cone. Such operation results in irregularities in the response characteristic of the speaker.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved loudspeaker in which the foregoing difficulty is overcome.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved loudspeaker as set forth wherein means are provided which prevent the suspension annulus from resonating.

In accomplishing these and other objects, there has been provided, in accordance with the present invention, a loudspeaker of the type having a large, low .frequency cone and a smaller, high frequency cone, the small cone being substantially a continuation of the conic surface of the larger cone. A number of small cones are secured to the front face of the conic surface of the large cone. These small cones are arranged in a non-symmetrical array with respect to the axis of the speaker and with theirvertices directed toward the front of the speaker. ln addition, a soft foam rubber or sponge annulus is se- Icured in energy absorbing relation to the surface of a corrugated annulus supporting the periphery of the larger cone.

A better understanding of the present invention may be had from the following detailed description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure l is an elevational view of the loudspeaker constructed in accordance with the present invention,

Figure 2 is an end view partly broken away of one of the diffusing cones secured to the speaker cone,

Figure 3 is a side view of cones shown in Figure 2,

Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 4 4 of Figure l.

Referring now to the drawing in more detail, there is shown a'loudspeaker of the type having a high frequency sound radiating cone 2 and a low frequency sound radiating cone 4. The low frequency cone 4 is secured at its periphery to compliant member 6 which is in turn supported by a rigid cone supporting member 3, commonly referred to -as a dishpan. The compliant member may be integral with the cone member and constitute an annulus having a plurality of concentric corrugations 10. The inner end of the low frequency cone is supported by a substantially similar compliant member 12 which is secured to a supporting ring 14 carried by the aforesaid dishpan 8. The high frequency cone 2 is supported at its periphery by a compliant member 16 which is carried by a supporting ring 18.

A motor unit for this type loudspeaker is shown and claimed in copending application Ser. No. 51,962, filed September 30, 1948 in the name of the present inventors now abandoned. That motor consists of a permanent magnetic member 20 mounted in an outer magnetic shell 22. A pole cap 24 and members 26 and 28 define a pair of cylindrical annular air gaps in which the voice coils 30 and 32, respectively, operate.

lt may be seen from an examination o f the drawings, particularly reference to Figure 4, that the high frequency cone 2 is mounted coaxially with the low frequency cone and constitutes substantially a continuation of the conic surface of the low frequency conc. Thus the high frequency cone denes the solid angle into which the high frequency cone radiates. In order to reduce that solid angle without appreciably altering the radiation characteristic of the low frequency cone a plurality of small conical members 34 are secured to the concave surface of the low frequency cone. It may be seen that these conical members substantially reduce the solid angle into which a high frequency cone radiates. However, since the low frequency cone operates as a piston the conical members do not appreciably affect the radiation characteristics of the low frequency cone.

As has been previously pointed out, when the high frequency cone is operating, reflections of the sound waves generated thereby are reflected from the surface of the low frequency cone. Since the two cones are mounted coaxially the low frequency cone is symmetrical about the axis of the high frequency cone. Therefore, the reflections from the low frequency cone will be uniform and will meet at a point Von the axis on the cones. lf the conical members 34 are symmetrically arrayed about the axis of the cone, the reflections from the low frequency cone may be somewhat diilused but there will be interference patterns set up. Consequently, to more edectively Vdiffuse the reflections from the low frequency antenas cone the conical members are arrayed asymmetrically with respect to the axis of the cone. The conical members, shown more clearly in Figures 2 and 3 are made of substantially the same material as the loudspeaker cone. lt may be noticed from the drawings that the periphery 36 of the conical members 3d is shaped to conform to the concave surface of the large low frequency cone. Thus, the conical members may be placed on the surface of the cone and cemented. The asymmetrical dispostion of the conical members 34 about the axis of the low frequency cone 4 is provided, as may be best observed in Fig. 1 of the drawing, by placing different ones of the conical members 3d at different distances from the inner end of the low frequency cone 4. he one of the conical members 34 located to the right, as viewed along the line 4 4 of Fig. 1, is closest to the inner end of the low frequency cone d. lt may be seen, as viewed by proceeding counterclockwise around the axis of the cone 4 from the just mentioned one of the conical members 34, that each of the other conical members 34 are disposed at progressively greater distances from the inner end of the low frequency cone d. The slightly added mass due to the conical members does not have a deleterious effect upon the response characteistic of the lower frequency cone. A1- ternatively, the smaller conical members may be protuberances formed in the surface of the speaker cone while it is being molded.

lt was also previously indicated that when the large cones are supported from the periphery by compliant member such as the corrugated annulus 6, the compliant member resonates and produces spurious response charcteristics. To overcome such resonant vibrations of the compliant support member, an annulus of sponge or foam rubber 3S is employed to absorb the acoustical energy of the compliant member. The energy absorbing annulus 3S may be rectangular in cross section as shown in Figure 4 or it may be round or the like. Whatever the cross sectional configuration may be the dimension is such that when the annulus is placed in one of the corrugations of the compliant member 6 it does not fit into the bottom of the corrugation but leaves an air space between the bottom o-f the corrugation and the surface of the annulus. Thus the annulus is mounted in the corrugation in bridging relation thereto. The points of contact between the annulus and the compliant member are cemented together. Thus arranged the annulus absorbs acousticai` energy coupled to the compliant member and accordingly prevents the compliant member from resonating within the audible range.

Thus it may be seen that there has been provided in accordance with the present invention an improved loudspeaker wherein the irregularities and response characteristics are substantially improved.

What is claimed is:

l. ln a double cone loudspeaker assembly having a low frequency concave cone and a high frequency cone mounted coaxially with said low frequency cone, said low frequency cone defining a solid angle into which said high frequency cone radiates, means for reducing said solid angle without altering the radiation characteristics of said low frequency cone, said means comprising a plurality of conical diffusion members associated with the concave surface of said low frequency cone in asymmetrical array about the axis of said low frequency cone.

2. ln a double-cone loudspeaker assembly having a low frequency concave cone and a high frequency cone mounted coaxially with said low frequency cone, diffusion means associated with said low frequency cone for limiting reflection from said low frequency cone of sound waves emitted by said high frequency cone, said means comprising a plurality of protuberances arranged in asymmetrical array about the axis of said low frequency cone.

3. In a double-cone loudspeaker assembly having a low frequency concave cone and a high frequency cone mounted coaxially with said low frequency cone and constituting substantially a continuation of the conic surface of said low frequency cone, means for reducing the solid angle into which said high frequency cone radiates, said means comprising a plurality of conical diffusing members secured to the concave surface of said low frequency cone in asymmetrical array about the axis of said high frequency cone, said conical diffusing members being arranged with their vertices oppositely directed from that of the low' frequency cone.

4. in a double-cone loudspeaker assembly of the type having a low frequency concave cone and a high frequency cone mounted coaxially with said low frequency cone and constituting substantially a continuation of the conic surface of said low frequency cone, diffusing means including asymmetrically arranged conical members associated with said low frequency cone for reducing the solid angle into which said high frequency cone radiates without altering the radiation characteristics of said low frequency cone.

5. ln a double-cone loudspeaker assembly having a low frequency concave cone and a high-frequency cone mounted coaxially with said l w frequency cone and constituting substantially a continuation of the conic surface of said low frequency cone, means for reducing the solid angle into which said high frequency cone radiates, said means comprising a plurality of conical di'dusing members secured to the concave surface of said low frequency cone in asymmetrical array about the anis of said high frequency cone, said conical diffusing members eing arranged with their vertices o'ipositely directed from that of the low frequency cone.

6. A loudspeaker comprising, in combination, low frequency concave conc, a separate high frequency conc, said high frequency cone being supported substantially coaxially with said low frequency cone with its conical surface constituting substantially a continuation of the conical surface of said low frequency cone, a plurality of asymmetrically arranged conical members associated with said low frequency cone for reducing the solid angle into which said high frequency cone radiates without appreciable changing the radiation characteristics of said low frequency cone.

7. In a double-cone loudspeaker assembly having a low frequency cone and a high frequency cone mounted coaxially with said low frequency cone, diffusion means associated with said low frequency cone for limiting reection from said low frequency conc of sound waves emitted by said high frequency cone, said means comprising a plurality of protuberances, each of said pretuberances being disposed at different azimuthal positions around the axis of said low frequency cone and at different altitudes measured along the axis of said low frequency cone whereby said protuberances are arranged in asymmetrical array about the axis of said low frcquency cone.

8. The double-cone loudspeaker assembly according to claim '7, wherein said protuberances are conical members secured to the concave surface of said low frequency cone,

Cited in the file of this UNUSED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3019849 *Jul 16, 1959Feb 6, 1962Gen Dynamics CorpLoudspeaker diaphragm suspension
US3603427 *May 5, 1969Sep 7, 1971Nippon Musical Instruments MfgLoudspeaker
US3834486 *May 30, 1972Sep 10, 1974Matsushita Electric Ind Co LtdVibration diaphragm and cone edge of a loudspeaker
US3837425 *Jun 11, 1973Sep 24, 1974Bozak IncEdge-damped diaphragm for electrodynamic loudspeakers
US4581496 *Sep 4, 1979Apr 8, 1986Emhart Industries, Inc.Diaphragm for attenuating harmonic response in an electroacoustic transducer
US4928312 *Oct 17, 1988May 22, 1990Amel HillAcoustic transducer
US5173942 *Oct 24, 1990Dec 22, 1992Sharp Kabushiki KaishaAudio system operable in directional and non-directional modes
US6411723Jun 22, 1999Jun 25, 2002Slab Technology LimitedLoudspeakers
US20040175016 *Mar 18, 2004Sep 9, 2004Kef Audio (Uk) LimitedCompound loudspeaker having a magnet system
US20040202342 *Mar 18, 2004Oct 14, 2004Kef Audio (Uk) LimitedCompound loudspeaker drive unit having a magnet system
Classifications
U.S. Classification181/164, 415/2.1, 381/184, 181/163, 381/392
International ClassificationH04R1/24, H04R9/06, H04R1/22, H04R9/00
Cooperative ClassificationH04R1/24, H04R9/06
European ClassificationH04R9/06, H04R1/24