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Publication numberUS2817169 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1957
Filing dateSep 3, 1954
Priority dateSep 3, 1954
Publication numberUS 2817169 A, US 2817169A, US-A-2817169, US2817169 A, US2817169A
InventorsSchott Howard H
Original AssigneeGen Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double tank spray iron
US 2817169 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 24, 1957 H. H. SCHOTT 2,817,159

DOUBLE TANK SPRAY IRON' Han/ARD cf/017 M/wam Dec. 24, 1957 H. H. scH'o-r'r 2,817,169

` DOUBLE TANK SPRAY IRON Filed Sept. 3, 1954 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Il III p Dec. 24, 1957 H. H. scHo'rT DOUBLE TANK SPRAY IRON Filed Sept. 3, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 fc4 /zz O agb@ MI/zwak bbw/4R0 /7 Sal/arf Y ,Jazz/We@ m Khmmmv United States Patent O DOUBLE TANK SPRAY IRON Howard H. Schott, St. Paul, Minn., assignor to General Mills, Inc., a corporation of Delaware Application September 3, 1954, SerialNo. 454,131

20 Claims. (Cl. 38-78) This invention relates in general to atirons of the domestic variety, and pertains more particularly to an iron capable of spraying the fabric undergoing a pressing operation with either of two separate and distinct liquids.

One object of the invention is to provide an electric iron equipped with a reservoir divided into two compartments, together with associated pumping mechanism by which liquid from either of the two compartments can be readily atomized and sprayed onto the material being ironed. In its more specific aspects the invention has in View the dual utilization of the iron for spraying plain water onto the fabric or for spraying a prepared starch solution thereon. For example, in the ironing of mens shirts, it is frequently desirably that the collars and cuffs be starched, whereas the remainder of the shirt need be only damp ironed.

With the above object in mind it will be recognized that there is a need for a double reservoir iron that may be quickly shifted from one liquid to another, and the instant invention has for an aim the provision of pumping structure whereby this end may be rapidly and effectively accomplished. 4

Another object of the iron is to permit the spraying of either of two liquids at controlled or selected rates of flow.

Another feature of the invention resides in the employment of a reservoir and pump arrangement that will not materially increase the over-all weight of the iron.

A further object of the invention is to produce a double purpose moistening iron that will not require any heat `for the application of moisture to the fabric, thereby leaving the heat generated by the heating element for the raising of the soleplate temperature. Stated` otherwise, it is a desideratum of the invention to refrain from withdrawing heat from the soleplate for conversion of the different liquids to a modified state by temperature change, the entire heat supply instead being made available for the pressing operation itself.

Further, another object of the invention is to permit the use of the iron as a dry type of iron whenever desired.

Other objects will be in part obvious, and in part pointed out more in detail hereinafter.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combination of elements and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the construction hereafter set forth and the scope of the application which will be indicated in the appended claims.

In the drawings,

Figure l is a side elevational View, parts being broken away to show the internal construction that one embodiment of the invention may assume;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view corresponding to the forward portion of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a front elevational view, parts again being broken away to illustrate the embodiment of Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is a detailed perspective view` of the rotary cam structure which is utilized in the construction of Fig. l;

rice

Fig. 5 is a front elevational view with portions thereof broken away to show a modification of the invention;

Fig.` 6 is a side elevational View similar to Fig. 1 but showing a still different embodiment that the invention may take;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Figs. 3 and 5 but showing the modification of Fig. 6; and

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken substantially in the direction of line 8 8 of Fig. 6.

Referring first to the embodiment forming the subject matter of Figs. 1-4, it will be observed that the iron selected for the purpose of'exemplifying this particular embodiment comprises a soleplate 10 having embedded therein a conventional encased heating element 12, the heating elementbeing in circuit with a thermostatic switch bearing the reference numeral 14. The switch 14 is equipped with an upstanding shaft 16 having at its upper end a manipulating knob 18 providing a facile way by which the switch may be adjusted for various ironing temperatures. Shown in circuit relationship with the heating element 12 and the switch 14 is a pair of electrical conductors 20 and 22, these conductors passing upwardly through a portion of a handle member 24 and continuing in the form of a flexible connector 26 by virtue of which the iron may be connected to the customary 60 cycle household electrical outlet.

Surmounting the soleplate 10 is a reservoir designated in its entirety by the numeral 28, the reservoir having a longitudinally directed partition 30 which divides the reservoir into two compartments 32 and 34. However, the partition need not in every instance be entirely located, for it will be appreciated that in some situations it will be desirable to have the compartments 32 and 34 of unequal volumetric capacities, depending chiefly on the respective demands for a given liquid. While it is possible for these compartments 32 and 34 to accommodate any particular liquid that may be desired in dampening the fabric undergoing a pressing operation, it is within the specific contemplation of the invention to utilize one of the compartments for the containing of a starch solution whereas the other compartment will be utilized for the storage of plain water. Therefore it will be assumed in the course of the ensuing description that the compartment 32 contains the starch solution and that the compartment 34 containslonly water. Providing access to the compartment 32 is a filler plug 36, the removal of which permits the introduction of the starch solution to this particular compartment. A similar filler plug 38 is employed in conjunction with the compartment 34 for permitting the introduction of water to this particular compartment.

For the purpose of spraying the contents of the compartment 32 upon the fabric material there is a rst nozzle assembly 40, this nozzle assembly being capable of atomizing the liquid starch into a tine spray or mist. A similar nozzle assembly 42 is utilized in the atomization of the water contained in the compartment 34. From an inspection of Fig. 1 it will be discerned that the nozzle assembly 42 consists of a tubular boss 44 axed, as by brazing, to the shell of the reservoir 28, the tubular boss 44 having a passage 46 extending therethrough for the purpose of conducting the water under pressure to a disk 48 having a small orifice 50 therein. The disk 48 is retained in place by reason of a threaded nut 52 having engagement with the forward end of the tubular boss 44. As hereinbefore indicated, the nozzle assemblies 40 and 42, are of like construction and therefore it is not felt necessary to describe the assembly 40 in detail. However in passing it might be mentioned that the orifice in the disk of the assembly 40 which would correspond to the disk 48 in the assembly 42 might be in certain situations of larger size than that actually shown in the cross sectional make-up of the nozzle assembly 42 inasmuch as the starch solution would normally be of greater density and viscosity than plain water. Also, depending upon the specific liquids to be pumped, various disks 48 might be supplied with the iron, each equipped with an orice of preferred dimensions to facilitate the discharge of any of certain liquids that may be desired.

Up to this point nothing has been said with regard to the means by which the particular liquids confined, in the compartments 32 and 34 are transmitted to the nozzle assemblies 40 and 42. In this regard it is planned that fa pair of pump mechanisms 54 and 56 -be employed and here again these mechanisms maybe of similar construction. Therefore, returning to Fig. l where the pump mechanism 56 is shown in sectional detail, it will ybe observed that this particular mechanism includes va vertically directed cylinder 58 in which there is disposed-a reciprocal piston 60. The lower end of the cylinder is equipped with a threaded plug 62 having `an aperture 6'4V passing therethrough; The lower end of the aperture 64 is in direct communication with the compartment 34 and the upper end of this aperture is slightly beveled for the accommodation of a ball check valve 66. Actually by exercising care in the design of the dimensions of the aperture 64 the ball check valve 66 may be dispensed with but for the purpose of facilitating-an understanding of justhow the pump mechanism 56 functions, it is felt desirable to` illustrate .the ball check 66. Further included as a partof the pump mechanism 56 is a forwardly directed tubular boss-68 circumferentially engaging the inner end of the rst-mentioned tubular boss 44. Held captive within the bore of the tubular boss 68 is a coiledsprlng 70 which bears against a second ball check 72. As can be seen from the drawings, the ball check'72 in turn bearsv against a-seat formed by an aperture 74 leading into the cylinder 58.

As can be seen from Fig. 3, each of the pump mechanisms 54 and 56 have piston rods 76 and 78, these piston rods being integral with their respective pistons such as the piston designated by the numeral 60 in Fig. 1. Circumscribing the piston rods 76 and 78 are coil springs 80 and 82, these coil springs bearing against the under side of enlarged heads 84 and 86 at the upper ends of the two piston rods 76 and 78. By having the lower ends of the springs 80 and 82 abut the upperside of a platform or floor member 88, it will be appreciated that these springs 80 and 82 may be kept under slight compression and in this way are instrumental in helping to elevate the piston rods 76 and/78.

For the purpose of rapidly and repeatedly overcoming the biasing faction of the springs 80 and Sp2-'there is provided an electromagnetic motor u nit 90. The electromagnetic motor includes a stack of E-shaped laminations forming a core 92, the core having its central leg encircled by a coil 94 which may be energized by reasonof a pair of conductors 96 and 98 in circuit witha switch generally designated by the numeral A100. AAs with the conductors 20 and 22, these last mentioned conductors 96 and 98 receive power via the connector 26, .being in parallel with said conductors 20 and 22. In this connection it will be discerned that the switch 100 includes a pair of s witch arms 102 and 104 each having a contact 106 at its free end. The Vswitch unit 100 is retained in place within a recessed portion of the handle 24 as by a bolt member 108. In riding relationship with the switch arm 102, which yis a resilient arm, is a slidable button or cam 110 having its upper surface serrated at 112 to facilitate the sliding manipulation of this button. Due to the cam action of the slidable button 110 it will be understood that the switch arm 102 is deected downwardly so that the contacts 106 are brought into engagement `whenever the button 110 is moved forwardly.

Also lconstituting part of the electromagnetiornotor of the armatures 114 and 116 lying opposite their pivotally connected ends `serve as actuators for the pump mechanisms 54 and 56, inasmuch as the under side of these armature ends bear directly against the upper surfaces of the heads 84 vand 86. Thus it will be seen that the armatures 114 and 116 when vibrated or oscillated about their pivot pin 118 force the piston rods 76 and 78 downwardly due to the magnetic attraction of the core 92 with the two armatures 114 and 116. The springs 80 and 82, of course, aid in raising the armatures 114 and 116 and in this way it will be seen that the armatures move both upwardly and downwardly in an oscillatory fashion.

In order to accommodate the electromagnetic motor 90, the handle member 24 is recessed at 120, the platform or floor 8S serving as the bottom wall for this particular recess 120. A yoke 122 serves the function of providing a journal 124 for a control shaft 126. A knob 128 is mounted at the upper end of the control shaft which is also journalled within a forward portion of the handle member 24 and at the lower end of this shaft there is carried a rotary cam 130. The purpose of the cam 130 is to control or govern the amount of vibration that the armatures 114 and 116 can be subjected to by the electromagnetic action of the core 92. With this aim in mind, specic reference should now be had to Fig. 4 where the rotary cam is pictured in perspective detail. In this particular ligure it can be discerned that the rotary cam 130 is configured so as to provide a segmental promontory 132.y which is of sufficient width so that it will overlie both of the armatures 114 and 116 and when so overlying both of the armatures will preclude the armatures from vibrating upwardly and downwardly due to the blocking action of this promontory 132. Since it is desired at times to control the ilow or rate of atomization of either of the liquids being pumped from the compartments 32 and 34 out through the nozzle assemblies 40 and 42, it is within the purview of the invention to form the rotary cam with inclined segmental surfaces 134 and 136. In this way, when the surface 134 is overlying one of the armatures 114 or 116, this particular armature will be permitted to vibrate through only a portion of its total possible angular travel. Consequently the displacement of the particular pump 54 or 56 with which the partially blocked armature is associated will be lessened with the consequence that its volumetric discharge or output is correspondingly reduced. As can be seen from Fig. 4, the combined segmental areas 132, 134, and 136 total approximately 180, leaving a dwell portion 138 which is of adequate elevation so that when this dwell portion 138 is overlying either of the armatures 114 or 116, then the particular armature which is subjacent the dwell portion 138 will be permitted to vibrate without impediment and the full capacity of the particular pump mechanism associated with the unhampered armature will be realized.

As illustrated in Fig. 2, the knob 128 has been rotated through an angle of substantially 90 so that the armature 116 is. blocked by the promontory 132 (see Fig. 3), leaving armature 114 free to vibrate to its fullest extent. By blocking the armature 116 it will be understood that the pump mechanism is inactivated and that no liquid will be forced from the compartment 34. Stated otherwise, when the knob 128 is in the position shown in Fig. 2, the iron is being used to apply the starch solution from the compartment 32 to the fabric undergoing the ironing operation, this taking place via the nozzle `assembly 40. Of course, in actual practice, the armatures vibrate at a rate of times per second (when connected to a 60 cycle source) and the total displacement of each of these armatures is only a fraction of an inch; hence it will be appreciated that the slope or inclination of the areas 134 and 136 is somewhat exaggerated and that the promontory 132 does not have to depend downwardly to the extent shown in order to fully block either of the armatures 114 and 116. However, this exaggerated condition pictured in Fig. 4 is believed helpful to a facile understanding of the invention.

Passing now to a discussion of the second embodiment, the same reference numerals have been applied to identical parts, and the salient diiference between the embodiment pictured in Fig. 5 from that in the earlier referred to figures resides in the use of a reciprocable cam means designated generally by the reference numeral 140. As will be seen from Fig. 5 this reciprocable cam means includes a bar 142 journalled for transverse sliding movement in the yoke 122. To enable the user of the iron to quickly bring into eifective blocking operation a promontory 144 formed integral with the bar 142 is a pair of push buttons 146 and 148. As indicated in Fig. 5, the push button 146 has been pressed so as to move the promontory 144 into blocking relationship with the armature 116, thereby conditioning the iron for a starch applying operation. For the purpose of maintaining the cam means 140 in its shifted position, there is provided a recess 150 housing a coil spring 152, the lower end of the coil spring bearing against a ball 154. The ball 154 in turn is engageable in any one of three notches 156, 158, 160, the notch 156 currently being in use to maintain the cam means 140 in its pictured position. However, depression of the push button 148 will result in the promontory 144 being moved to the left and when the ball 154 rests in the notch 158, then the promontory will straddle both the armatures 114 and 116 to prevent the operation of either and of course when the button 148 is fully pressed to the left then the ball 154 rests in the notch 160 to hold the promontory.

144 in superimposed relation with the armature 114, thereby blocking the vibratory movement of said armature 114.

From the preceding paragraph it will be discerned that the embodiment of Fig. 5 differs in its function by reason of the reciprocable cam means 140 in contradistinction to the rotary type of cam means 130 described in the earlier embodiment.

In some instances it will be desirable to utilize only a single pump mechanism 54 or 56 together with a single armature 114 or 116. Consequently the modification of Figs. 6-8 concerns the utilization of only a single pump mechanism which has been given the reference numeral 162 in order to distinguish it from the pump mechanisms 54 and 56 although, in general, as will presently be recognized, there is appreciable similarity between the pump mechanism 162 and the earlier referred to ones 54 and 56. The pump mechanism 162 comprises a vertically directed cylinder 164 in which a piston 166 is mounted for reciprocable movement. The lower end of the cylinder 164 is of -a T-shaped configuration inasmuch as a horizontal cylinder 168 is employed, the horizontal clyinder 168 establishing communication between the compartment 32 and the compartment 34. Communication between the vertical cylinder 164 and the horizontal cylinder 168 is effected by means of a threaded boss 170 integral with the cylinder 168, which boss is received in the lower end of the cylinder 164. The boss 170 corresponds to the plug 62 having therein an aperture 172 at the upper end of which is disposed a ball check 174.

The cylinder 168, as already indicated, provides a means of conducting liquid from either of the compartments 32 or 34 and to control selective withdrawal of liquid from either of these two compartments it is envisaged that a reciprocable piston 176 be slidably disposed within the bore of the cylinder 168. As best seen from Fig. 7, the piston is equipped with a piston rod 178 extending in the direction of the compartment 34. To the free end of the piston rod 178 is pivotally attached a crank element 180 by means of a pin 182. The crank 180 is secured to the lower end of an upstanding shaft 184 having its lower end journalled in a cup bearingl86. The shaft 184 extends upwardly through a grommet 188 in the shell of the reservoir 28, continu ing upwardly through a portion of a somewhat modified handle member 190 and terminating in a knob 192 by which the shaft 184 may be rotated to shift the piston 176 to either side of the aperture 172 and thereby determine from which compartment 32 or 34 liquid is to be withdrawn. When the shaft 184 is viewed from above, it will be recognized that the clockwise rotation of the shaft is instrumental in moving the piston 176 to the left in Fig. 7, thereby establishing communication with the compartment 34, and counterclockwise rotation moves the piston to the right to connect the compartment 32.

The upper end of the piston 166 has integral therewith a piston rod 194 corresponding to the piston rods 76 and 78 and encircling this piston rod is a coil spring 196 bearing against the under side of an enlarged head 198. Here again, the spring 196 has its lower end abutting a platform or oor 200 so that when the spring 196 is under a slight compression, the piston 166 is urged upwardly. An electromagnetic motor 202 provides the actuating force for causing the piston 166 to reciprocate rapidly within the cylinder 164, this motor 202 being generally similar to the earlier described motor 90. However, the salient ditference between the two motors resides in the fact that the matter motor 202 is equipped with only a single armature 204 instead of the twin armatures 114 and 116. Returning to a more complete description of the pump mechanism 162, it will be seen from Fig. 6 that this pump mechanism is provided with a forwardly extending tubular portion 206 having contained therein a coil spring 208, one end of which bears against a ball check 210 for the purpose of sealing an aperture 212 formed in the Vertical cylinder 164.

The opposite `end of the tubular portion 206 has communication with a nozzle assembly designated in its e11- tirety by the numeral 214. Inasmuch as this nozzle assembly is identical in construction with either of the nozzle assemblies 40 and 42, the duplication of parts contained therein has been denoted by the same specific reference numerals lapplied to Fig. l. However, owing to the fact that a single mechanism 162 is employed in the currently described embodiment only a single nozzle assembly 214 is required for the shifting of the piston 176 determines from which tank the liquid is to be withdrawn, the nozzle assembly 214 serving to spray either the starch solution from the compartment 32 or the water from the compartment 34, these liquids having been suggested hereinbefore.

Reference to Fig. 8 will show that a longitudinally disposed partition 230 is utilized in forming the compartments 32 and 34, this partition 230 having been differentiated from the partition 30 inasmuch as it consists in the exemplified embodiment of several sections or panels to permit the pump mechanism 162 to be centrally located. Other than the particular construction mentioned, it will be appreciated that the partition 230 serves the same oice as the one referred to earlier.

With the foregoing details in mind, it is believed that the operation of the several embodiments herein disclosed will be manifest. However, to assure a thorough understanding of the operation associated with each embodiment, a brief sequence will be given and in this connection reference should again be had to Figs. 1 4. It will be recalled that this embodiment utilizes a pair of nozzle assemblies 40 and 42, the selection of liquid from either the compartment 32 or 34 being made by rotation of the knob 128. For instance, when the knob 128 is moved counterclockwise to the position of Fig. 2, then the iron is conditioned for the spraying of the starch solution from the compartment 32 by way of the nozzle assembly 40 inasmuch as the promontory 132 then blocks the vibration of the armature 116. If a lesser amount of starch solution is desired then a reduced ow of starch solution a lesser angle than the depicted in Fig. 2, for then a portion of the surface 134 will lie above the armature 114 i-nstead of the ldwellportion 138. Thusmovement of .the-armature 1.114 is limited tota certain extent andthe full pumping capacity of the pump mechanism 54 is not achieved. However, the `promontory 132 will overlie the armature 116 just as before although not to the full angular extent brought about when in the position of Fig. 2.

From Fig. 1 it can be seen-that thepumping action is etected rapidly, the upward stroke of the-piston, due to the:vibratoryy action of the motor90,tending to evacuate the cylinder V58. The evacuation, of course, need not be complete to draw liquid upward-ly past the check valve 66. On the downward or reverse stroke, the entrapped liquid will be-forced through the aperture 74 past the check 72 through the nozzle assembly 44, said assembly acting toy atomize-the liquid into ane mist or spray which is directed at a downward angle onto -the vfabric being pressed.

As already indicated,they embodiment of Fig, 5 is similar to that of Figs. 1-4 and in this-particular lsituation the pressing of the push button 146 is responsible for having the promontory 144 moved into a superimposed relationship with the armature 116 -thereby blocking the vibration of this particular armature. As illustrated in Fig. ;5, the iron is conditioned for the pumping of the starch solution from compartment 32. When a plain water spray is desired, then the operator presses Athe button 148 to move the cam means 140 in an opposite direction and to bring the promontory 144 in juxtaposition with the amature 114. A central positioning of the cam means 140 lwill cause both armatures 114 and 116 to be blocked and no pumping of liquid from either compartment is then accomplished.

It might be explained at this time that in the embodiment of Figs. 1-4 and Fig. 5, the-movement of either the promontory 132 or the promontory 144, respectively, to acentral position blocks the reciprocatory movement of both of the armatures and in this way the iron serves the function of a dry type of iron just as though the switch button 112 has been moved to an off position. Hence, it will be appreciated that there is made available to the user of the iron two courses of action conditioning the iron for dry operation: either the user may deenergize the electromagnetic motor 90 or he may block the movement of the armatures 114 and 116 constituting a part thereof.

In operating the embodiment of Figs. 6-8 substantially the same manipulation is undertaken as in the embodiment of Figs. l-4 but instead the knob 192 is responsible for moving the piston 176 to either side of the aperture 172 to physically block the entrance of liquid from either the compartment 32 or 34 to the single pump mechanism designated by the numeral 162. When the valve mechanism, which includes the piston 176, is actuated in a direction to move the piston to the right as viewed in Fig. 7 then the pumping of a starch solution from the compartment 32 is etected whereas movement of the piston 176 in an opposite direction is responsible for conditioning the iron for the pumping of plain water. The point to be appreciated here is that only a single nozzle assembly 214 is incorporated into the iron in contradistinction to the twin nozzle assemblies 40 and 42 employed in the two earlier referred to embodiments.

As many changes could be made in the above construction and many apparently widely diierent embodiments of this invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

AIt is also to be understood that the Ilanguage used in the-following'claims is intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention `herein described and al1 statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, mightbe said to fall therebetween.

I claim:

1. A-spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for vstoring diierent liquids, nozzle means, and means for-pumping liquid from either of said compartments through said nozzle means.

2. `A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for storing different liquids, nozzle means, reciprocable pump means for pumping liquid from either of said compartments through said nozzle means, and vibratory electric motor means for driving said reciprocable pump means.

3. A spray ironcomprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for containing diterent liquids, a nozzle, a pump mechanism for pumping liquid from said reservoir means through said nozzle, and valve means for selecting the liquid to be pumped.

4. A spray iron comprisinga soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for containing different liquids, a handle disposed above the reservoir means, a nozzle, a pump mechanism for pumping liquid from said reservoir means through said nozzle, valve means for selecting the liquid to be pumped, and control means extending upwardly from said valve means to operational juxtaposition with said handle for manipulation of said valve means.

5. A spray iron comprising a'soleplate, reservoirmeans surmounting the-soleplate having a longitudinal partition forming a pair of compartments for containing different liquids, a nozzle, a pump mechanism for pumping liquid from said reservoir means through said nozzle, a T-shaped connection'connecting said pump mechanism to each compartment, land valve means for selectively blocking communication from one of said compartments, whereby liquid can be pumped through said nozzle from the other compartment.

6. A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate having a longitudinal partition forming a pair of compartments for containing different liquids, a nozzle, a pump mechanism for pumping liquid from said reservoir Ameans through said nozzle, a laterally directed cylindrical member extending between compartments having a take-011 intermediate its ends leading to the intake of said pump mechanism, and a piston member slidable within said cylindrical member for selectively establishing communication between either compartment and saidpump intake.

7. A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for containing different liquids, a nozzle mounted near the forward end of said reservoir means for directing an atomized stream against fabric being pressed by said soleplate, a cylinder and piston reciprocable therein forming a pump for pumping liquid under pressure to said nozzle, electromagnetic means including an armature for oscillating said piston, and valve means for selectively connecting said pump to either of said compartments.

-8. A spray iron comprising a'soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartmentsV for containing diierent liquids, a pair of nozzles, a rstpump mechanism associated with one compartment for pumping liquid from one compartment through one nozzle, and a second pump mechanism associated with the other compartment for pumping liquid from the other compartment through the other nozzle.

9. A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for containing different liquids, a pair of nozzles, a rst pump mechanism associated with one compartment for-pumping liquid from one compartment through one nozzle, a second pump mechanism associated with the other compartment for pumping liquid from the other compartment through the other nozzle, and motor means for selectively operating said pump mechanisms.

10. A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for containing different liquids, a pair of nozzles, a rst pump mechanism associated with one compartment for pumping liquid from one compartment through one nozzle, a second pump mechanism associated with the other compartment for pumping liquid from the other compartment through the other nozzle, and electromagnetic means including a pair of armatures for selectively operating said pump mechanisms.

11. A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for containing diierent liquids, a pair of nozzles, a first reciprocable pump mechanism for pumping liquid from one compartment through one nozzle, a second reciprocable pump mechanism for pumping liquid from the other compartment through the other nozzle, electromagnetic means including a pair of armatures for oscillating said pump mechanisms, and means for blockinactive the pump mechanism with which the blocked armature is associated.

12. A spray iron in accordance with claim l1 in which said blocking means includes a rotary cam.

13. A spray iron in accordance with claim l1 in which said blocking means includes a reciprocable cam.

14. A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate having a longitudinal partition forming a pair of compartments for containing dilerent liquids, a pair of nozzles, a first cylinder and piston reciprocable therein forming a first pump for under pressure from one compartment to of armatures for respectively oscillating said pistons, and cam means overlying both of said armatures provided with a promontory capable of selectively blocking the movement of either armature and thereby render inactive the pump with which that particular armature is associated.

15. A spray iron in accordance with claim 14 in which said cam means includes a rotary cam member and said promontory is of suiiicient width to straddle both of said partially blocking either armature whereby the displacement of either said first or second pump may be varied.

16. A spray iron in accordance with claim 14 in which said cam means includes a reciprocable cam having lateral extensions thereof equipped with push buttons.

A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments for containing diierent liquids, a handle disposed above the reservoir means, a pair of nozzles, a irst pump mechanism for pumping liquid from one compartment to one nozzle, a second pump mechanism for pumping liquid from the other compartment to the other nozzle, electromagnetic means including a pair of armatures for respectively actuating said pump mechanisms, and cam means carn'ed by said handle for selectively inactvating either of said armatures and its associated pump mechanism.

18. A spray iron in accordance with claim 17 in which said cam means includes a rotary cam member, a shaft extending upwardly therefrom through the handle and a manipulating knob on the upper end of said shaft.

19. A spray iron in accordance with claim 17 in which said cam means includes a slidable cam member mounted for transverse reciprocatory movement with respect to said handle, said cam member being equipped with laterally extending push buttons by which said cam member may be moved.

20. A spray iron comprising a soleplate, reservoir means surmounting the soleplate including a pair of compartments disposed in a side-by-side relationship for storing different liquids, nozzle means, and means depending into both of said compartments for pumping liquid from either of said compartments through said nozzle means.

References Cited in the iile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 2,817,169 December 24, 195'? Howard H. Schot-b Signed and sealed this 25th day of' February 1958.

(SEAL) Attest:

KARL H AXIINE ROBERT c. wA'rsoN Wasting Officer Comiaaioner of Patents

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Classifications
U.S. Classification38/77.1
International ClassificationD06F75/22, D06F75/08
Cooperative ClassificationD06F75/22
European ClassificationD06F75/22