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Publication numberUS2817371 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1957
Filing dateNov 2, 1953
Priority dateNov 2, 1953
Publication numberUS 2817371 A, US 2817371A, US-A-2817371, US2817371 A, US2817371A
InventorsBussiere Joseph
Original AssigneeBates Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Open mesh fabric woven with synthetic yarn
US 2817371 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 24, 1957 J. BUSSIE RE OPEN MESH FABRIC WOVEN WITH SYNTHETIC YARN Filed Nov. 2. 1953 INVENTOR. JOSEPH BUSSIERE A ATTORNEYS hitherto been found impractical, for this purpose.

United States Patent OPEN MESH FABRIC WOVEN WITH SYNTHETIC YARN Joseph Bussiere, Lewiston, Maine, assignor to Bates Manufacturing Company, a corporation of Maine Application November 2, 1953, Serial No. 389,651

7 Claims. (Cl. 139-383) This invention relates to open mesh fabrics and more particularly it relates to open mesh fabrics formed of synthetic yarns in which the filling and warp ends are maintained in an equidistant and parallel relationship by means of a plurality of interwoven binder threads.

When weaving open mesh fabrics with synthetic yarns, there is a marked tendency for the filling and warp ends to bunch or slip out of position during and after the fabric is-woven. This slippage tendency, which primarily is due to the lack of a natural self-binding characteristic in synthetic yarns, is so pronounced in a plain weave that the fabric cannot be conveniently handled without disrupting the parallel and equidistant alignment of the filling and warp ends.

Several attempts have been made to overcome this problem, but none has been commercially successful. For example, .a leno weave has been used in open mesh fabrics of this nature, however, it has been found that this technique at best, merely reduces the slippage tendency. Furthermore, a leno leave is undesirable for many industrial purposes.

In the production of open mesh abrasive fabric with synthetic yarns, for example, it has been found that a plain weave and other types of weaves, such as a twill weave, are preferable to a leno weave. However, because of the slippage problem, plain or twill weaves have Even if an adhesive coating is supplied to the woven fabric this difficulty is not overcome because slippage occurs in a significant degree between the time the fabric is woven and when the adhesive coating is applied. Furthermore, even with an adhesive coating, the material must be handled with great care during the subsequent production steps.

To overcome this problem, the applicant has devised a simple and effective means whereby the filling and warp ends in an open mesh fabric formed of synthetic yarns, are maintained in the proper position, even when the cloth is handled for a considerable length of time before and after a plastic coating is applied thereto. In accordance with,this invention, pairs of relatively fine binder warp threads are disposed adjacent to, and on either side of each of the warp ends. The binder threads are interlaced with the filling ends and thereby hold the warp ends in position. When the fabric is woven, the binder warp threads are barely visible to the naked eye because they are partially covered by the thicker warp ends.

For a better understanding of this invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is an enlarged schematic perspective view of a portion of a plain weave open mesh fabric including pairs of binder warp threads to hold the warp ends in position; and

Figure 2 is a planned view of an open mesh twill weave fabric woven in accordance with this invention.

With reference to Figure 1, an open mesh plain weave fabric 10 woven with synthetic yarn, is formed by a plurality of equally spaced warp ends 11 which are interwoven with a plurality of equally spaced filling ends 12.

Pairs of relatively fine binder warp threads 13 and 14 are disposed on either side of each of the warp ends 11 and are also interwoven in a plain weave pattern with the filling ends 12. In this respect, it will be noted that the binder threads forming each pair, are interwoven in opposite sequence. For example, the binder thread 13 passes under and over the filling ends and 12b, respectively, and binder thread 14 passes over and under the same filling ends. The binder threads may be formed of cotton or other types of natural fibers, or of glass, rayon, nylon and other synthetic fibers.

It will be appreciated that after the fabric is woven, each pair of binder threads 13 and 14 hold one of the warp ends 11, which is interposed therebetween, in position with respect to the spaced apart filling ends 12. The binder threads also serve to maintain the filling ends 12 in their proper position. In addition, it will be appreciated that the binder threads 13 and 14 are barely visible to the naked eye because they are partially covered by the larger warp end 11, and each warp end and associated pair of binder threads appear as a single thread in the woven fabric. In this connection, the warp ends 11 may be formed of finer yarn than the filling ends 12 in order that the total thickness of each warp end and associated pair of binder threads is approximately equal to the thickness of a single filling end.

It is to be understood that this binder thread arrangement may be utilized to bind the warp ends in other types of open mesh weaves woven with synthetic yarns. For example, Figure 2 discloses an open mesh twill weave fabric 18 which may be used for the production of relatively coarse abrasive materials, and for other purposes.

The fabric 18 shown in Figure 2, is formed of a plurality of equally spaced warp ends 19 which are interwoven in a twill weave pattern with a plurality of equally spaced filling ends 20. It will be noted that in a twill weave pattern, the warp end 19a passes over filling ends 200 and 26b and under filling ends 20c and 20d, etc., and the next adjacent warp end 19b passes over filling end 20a and under filling ends 20b and 290, etc. This weaving pattern is repeated throughout the fabric, there- I by forming diagonally extending ridges in the woven fabric, as indicated in the drawing by the light spots on the warp ends 19.

As in the previous modification, pairs of relatively fine binder Warp threads 21 and 22 are disposed on either side of each of the warp ends 19. Each of the binder threads 21 and 22 are interwoven in opposite sequence, in a plain weave pattern, with the filling ends 20. For example, binder thread 21 passes under and over filling ends Ziia and 29b, and the adjacent binder thread 22 passes over and under the same filling ends 20a and 201;, respectively.

The binder threads 21 and 22 serve to maintain the warp ends 19 in an equidistant and parallel relationship, and also hold the filling ends 20 in their proper position. In addition, the added binding effect obtained by the twill weave helps to secure the filling and warp ends in position.

In the production of abrasive fabrics, for example, a protective coating of neoprene, polyethylene, vinyl-vinylidene chloride, styrene-butadiene and the like, may be applied after the fabric is woven. The coating serves to bond the filling and warp ends at their interlacing points, and also to strengthen and protect the individual threads. Thereafter, the coated fabric is treated with abrasive material, the latter also being firmly bonded thereto in a suitable manner.

It is to be understood that for certain types of open mesh fabrics a single binder thread may be used in conjunction with each warp end. Also, it is to be understood that the binder thread arrangement described above may be used in conjunction with other types of weaves, and that interlacing pattern of the binder threads may be varied if desired. Therefore, the form of thevinvention described above should be considered as illustrative and not as limiting the scope of the'following claims.

Iclaim: H

1. In an open mesh fabric'forrned of synthetic yarns which includes a plurality of spa'ced warp ends interwoven with a plurality of s'pa'ce d filling ends, the improvement which comprises pairs of relatively fine binder warp ends dsiposed adjacent to and one on either side of each of said warp ends and which are interwoven with said filling ends, the binder warp ends ofach pair being maintained in substantially uniformlateral spacing in the 21 An open mesh fabric formed of synthetic yarns which ing ends, .the binder warp ends forming said-pair's being 5 interwoven in opposite sequence with 's'aitl filling ends.

3. -'An open mesh fabric fonnedo'f' synthetic ryarnsf which includes a plurality of spacedj war j'i' ends inter woven with a plurality of spaced filling ends, the improvement which comprises pairs of relatively fine binderwarp ends disposed adjacent to and one a either side of each of said spaced warp ends and" which are interwoven with said filling ends, at least onewarp end of f each of said pairs of binder warp ends being interwoven with saidfilling ends in different sequence with to the warp end interposed therebetween.

4. An'open mesh fabric formed of synthetic yarns which" includes a plurality of spaced warp ends interwoven with a plurality of spaced filling ends, the improvement which comprises pairs of relatively fine binder warp endsedi 'sposed adjacent to and one on either side of each of saidspaced warp ends and which are interwoven with said filling ends, said warp ends being of lesser thickness than; I said filling ends, and the combined thickness of-a pair of binder warp ends and the warp end interposed there-' between being substantiallythe same as the thickness of one of said filling'ends.-

4 5. An open mesh fabric formed of synthetic yarns which includes a plurality of spaced warp ends interwoven with a plurality of spaced filling ends, the improvement which comprises pairs of relatively fine binder warp ends disposed adjacent to and one on either side of each of said spaced warp ends and which are interwoven with said filling ends, said warp and filling ends being interwoven in a twill weave pattern and said pairs of binder warp ends being interwoven with said filling ends in a plain weave pattern and with the respective ends of each pair of binder warp ends being interwoven in opposite sequence.

6. An open mesh fabric formed of synthetic yarns which includes a plurality of spaced warp ends interwoven with a plurality of spaced filling ends, the improvement.which comprises pairs of relatively fine binder warp ends disposed adjacent to and one on either side of each of said spaced warp ends and which are interwoven with said filling ends, said warp and filling ends being interwoven in a twill weave 'p'attern and said pairs of binder warp ends being interwovenv with said filling ends in a plain weavepatternfland inldifiere iitjseguence with respect to the warp ens interposed ;therebe'tween.

7.--' In- 'an-openniesh'- fabric "formed of a plurality of spaced warp-ends interwoven with 'a plurality of relatively m nes-spaces filling' 'eiids, the improvementwhich comprises a plurality;bf 'relatively' fine binder warp ends, at le'ast'one of which is disposed closely adjacent each of said warp ends and which is interwoven with said filling 30 w end in opposite sequence'than the warp end associated therewith, the combined thickness of a warp end and an I associated binder warp end being substantially equal to tlie' thicknessof one of said filling ends. t sp i I References Cited in the file or. patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,964,419 Asten June 26, 1934 2,105,190 Jackson n, Ian. 11, 1938 2,172,430 Barrell '-Sept.- 12, 1939 2,491,396 Secke1 Dec. 13, 1949 2,539,301 Foster ..-Ja'n 23, 1951 2,544,223 Ellis- Y Mar. 6, 1951 Cotterillet; al a Dec. '14, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No 2,817,371 December 24, 1957 Joseph Bussiere It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below Column 1, line 34, for "leno leave" read -=--=leno weaveline 42, for 'supplied" read -=-=-applied"-,

Signed and sealed this 18th day of February 1958 (SEAL) Attest:

KARL H. AXLINE ROBERT C WATSON Attesting Officer (Tontnissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1964419 *Sep 1, 1931Jun 26, 1934Eduard V AstenPorous textile fabric
US2105190 *Jul 29, 1935Jan 11, 1938Neisler Mills IncWoven fabric
US2172430 *Oct 14, 1937Sep 12, 1939Lawrence Duck CompanySingle ply drier felt with asbestos facing
US2491396 *Aug 4, 1947Dec 13, 1949Seckel Ernst JAdhesive thread and fabric
US2539301 *Jul 15, 1949Jan 23, 1951Us Rubber CoWoven glass fabric and method of making same
US2544223 *Sep 29, 1948Mar 6, 1951Ellis William DLaundry net
US2696847 *Jul 12, 1950Dec 14, 1954Courtaulds LtdSieve for the sifting of materials
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3250662 *Jan 16, 1964May 10, 1966Domestic Film Products CorpCoated fabric
US3316072 *Oct 10, 1963Apr 25, 1967Carborundum CoAbrasive coated backing of sheathed synthetic fiber yarns
US3487593 *Aug 29, 1967Jan 6, 1970Norton CoMethod for producing a stretchresistant coated abrasive product
US3861892 *Feb 8, 1973Jan 21, 1975Norton CoCoated abrasive material and manner of manufacture
US4002188 *Dec 15, 1975Jan 11, 1977Phifer Wire Products, Inc.Woven shade screen
US4035961 *Jun 27, 1975Jul 19, 1977Norton CompanyCoated abrasive backing of dimensionally stabilized heat stretched fabric
US6092579 *Nov 18, 1998Jul 25, 2000Bhs Corrugated Maschinen-Und Anlagenbau GmbhMachine for the production of an at least single-face lined web of corrugated board
US6397920 *Feb 26, 1999Jun 4, 2002Hexcel Fabrics (Societe Anonyme)Network with variable opening factor for constituting light alternating screens
US6684911Feb 12, 2003Feb 3, 2004Milliken & CompanyTextile
US6786242Dec 18, 2003Sep 7, 2004Milliken & CompanyMethod for making a textile
US7244684 *Dec 11, 2003Jul 17, 2007Texplorer GmbhThermal camouflage sheet
US20140060758 *Mar 29, 2013Mar 6, 2014Rubén CuatepotzoEasy roll stiff screen
WO2003060226A2 *Jan 7, 2003Jul 24, 2003Milliken & CoTextile
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/383.00R, 139/420.00A, 139/420.00R, 51/298
International ClassificationD03D23/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D23/00, D03D2700/01
European ClassificationD03D23/00