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Publication numberUS2818063 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1957
Filing dateJan 13, 1954
Priority dateJan 13, 1954
Publication numberUS 2818063 A, US 2818063A, US-A-2818063, US2818063 A, US2818063A
InventorsTheodore W Smith, Albert J Heger, Kenneth F Mcconnell
Original AssigneeW E Isle Company, Knit Rite Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cervical collar
US 2818063 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 31, 1 957 n; l'nnnn IIIIIIIIIA I Inuunnm lul almlw /dmwl T. W. SMITH ET AL CERVICAL COLLAR Filed Jan. 13, 1954 United States Patent CERVICAL COLLAR Theodore W. Smith and Albert J. Hegel, Kansas City,

Mo., and Kenneth F. McConnell, Merriam, Kans., assignors to The W. E. Isle Company and/or T he Knit- Rite Company, Kansas City, Mo., a partnership Application January 13, 1954, Serial No. 403,782

7 Claims. (Cl. 128-87) This invention relates to the field of surgical supports, hospital fittings, braces and the like, and particularly to a new and improved cervical collar, the primary object being to provide a head support in the nature of a split band that is universally adapted for a large number of applications because of the provision of uniquely arranged and disposed parts, together with novel take-up means permitting extensive adjustment, all without undue discomfort to the wearer.

For the most part cervical collars heretofore developed have necessarily been custom-made to fit the particular user and to meet his needs. While universal collars have heretofore been suggested, the same have not been practical nor extensively commercialized because for the most part, they contemplate utilization of heavy, expensive and uncomfortable parts, including many metal elements for accomplishing the necessary adjustments of the head with respect to the body of the user.

In accordance with the principles of the present invention the cervical collar contemplated thereby is of a flexible nature so that the same will conform to the head and body of the user and, by virtue of the adjusting means aforementioned, can be shaped and formed to the users dimensions and to his need so far as holding the head in a proper position is concerned.

As will hereinafter appear, the surgical collar forming the subject matter of the present invention is made primarily from leather, heavy felt, plastic or the like so that the same is flexible and, therefore, not only comfortable to the user but adapted to be formed in a rather precise manner to the shape and configuration of the head, neck, back and shoulders of the user.

To the end that the collar is properly and comfortably supported, it is provided with shoulder straddling concavities, a breast-engaging apron including a pair of flared wings, and a pair of flared back-engaging flaps opposed to the wings. Similarly, so that the head is properly supported by the collar, the latter has a chinreceiving cup and a pair of flared tongues opposed to the cup and adapted to engage the back of the head. Take-up means is provided adjacent the tongues and the flaps between the wings and at the chin cup in the nature of a chin strap to vary the positions of the various parts whereby the head is held tipped or at any desired angle, depending upon the condition to be corrected through use of the cervical collar.

For a full understanding of the present invention, reference may be had to the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure l is a front perspective view of a cervical collar made pursuant to the present invention, showing the same in an operable position around a users neck.

Fig. 2 is a rear perspective view thereof illustrating the collar fastened around the said users neck.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the cervical collar removed from the users neck and laid out in a flat condition; and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary, detailed cross-sectional view taken on line IV--IV of Fig. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows. I

By comparing Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing with Fig. 3, it is seen that the cervical collar 10, about to be described, is adapted for forming from the flat condition shown in Fig. 3 into a split band encircling theneck of a user in the manner illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing.

Collar 10 is, therefore, made preferably from a suitable flexible material such as leather, but it is conceivable that within the concepts of the present invention such substances as heavy felt, plastic or similar material may be utilized. In any event, the innermost face of the collar 10 should be lined with a soft material where necessary, particularly where the collar comes into contact with the skin of the user and there is shown, therefore, a liner 12 completely covering the innermost face of the collar 10 and made from soft felt, cotton or other fabric material. It may be held in place by a continuous line of stitching 14.

A central body portion 16 has a front portion 18 and a rear portion 26, both of which are substantially concave-convex when the collar 10 is placed around the neck as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. The front portion 18 extends into a downwardly and forwardly flared breast-engaging apron 22 that is transversely split as at 24 to present a pair of wings 26 and 28, the liner 12 being similarly split at 30. Take-up means in the nature of tying tapes or cords 32, threaded through eyelets 34 inthe apron 22, interconnect the wings 26 and 28.

The lowermost edge of the collar 10 is also provided with a pair of concavities 36 and 38 straddling the shoulders of the user when the collar is around the neck and the uppermost edge of the collar 10 may likewise be provided with a pair of concavities 40 and 42 if desired to provide clearance for the face, as best seen in Fig. 2 of the drawing, and to shape the said uppermost edge of the collar 10 substantially to the jawbone of the user.

The ends of the band 10 terminate in a pair of elongated elements 44 and 46, it being seen therefore, that the collar 10 is provided with a pair of intermediate portions 48 and 50 between body 16 and elements 4446.

of reduced widths, portion 48 being between concavities 36 and 40 and portion 50 being between concavities 38 and 42. The portions 48 and 50 straddle the shoulders of the user immediately below his ears, as shown in Fig. 2 when the collar is about the neck.

The elements 44 and 46 present upwardly and rearwardly flared head-engaging means 52 and downwardly and rearwardly flared back-engaging means 54 forming a part of the rear concavo-convex portion 20 bridged between the head and the back as best seen in Fig. 2. The means 52 is composed of a pair of tongues 56 and 58 at the uppermost ends of the elements 44 and 46 respectively, and the back-engaging means 54 is composed of a pair of flaps 60 and 62 below the tongues 56 and 58 and at the lowermost ends of the elements 44 and 46 respectively.

The front concave-convex portion 18 which includes the apron 22, is bridged between the breast and the chin and includes additionally, a chin-receiving cup 64 at the uppermost edge of body 16 in opposed relationship to apron 22 and midway between the tongues 56 and 58. Cup 64 is produced by splitting the body as at 66 and the liner 12 is similarly split as at 68. By virtue of the provision of concavities 40 and 42 there is presented a pair of chin-embracing members 70 and 72 forming the cup 64. The members 70 and 72 or cup 64, together with the tongues 56 and 58, and, to the extent that the jawbone rests within the concavities 40 and 42 or adjacent theretowithin the collar 10, all combine to saddle the head of the user and thereby support the same by remov.

Patented Dec. 31, 1957 ingall -or partt-of. the weight. of the .head. from. therneck.

and backbone when the collar is properly adjusted as hereinafter explained.

'The m'eans for fasteningthe collar l to the' neck-of the user consists of suitable take-up HIEHIISWhlChglHlhB form chosen for-illustration, consists ofsa plurality of flexible straps7'4 attached-to'dhe elementand a corresponding number of'buckles'76 secured totheelement' longitudinally thereof between tongues-56 and 58 and fiaps- 60 -62. The'stays"84-and-86, which'may be made of thin spring metal or othermaterial, are fastened in place suchas' by'use of'lines of stitching 88 connecting the-liner 1'2 with the bandll) as best-seen inFig. 4 and/or by useof rivets or the like.

The body 16 may besimilarly reinforced adjacent the portion 18 by resilient stays 90 and 92, extending between members 70 and 72 and apron 22 and diverging as the latter is approached. Lines of stitching94 and/or rivets or the like (not shown) hold'the stays 90 and 92 in place and body'l fi maybeprovided' with a plurality of vent openings 96 if desired.

It is extremely important'to note that the fastening mea'ns74-76; as well as thetake-up'mea'ns 32', and-even thechin' strap 78,- all cooperate 'in holding the headin preselected positions, depending upon adjustment that is' made'in these take-up means. Theextent'to'which'the head is raised oil the spine, muscles and other parts of the-body supporting the same, isd'ependent in part'upon howtightthe band is drawn around the neck ofthe' user by adjustmentofth'e straps 74 and 'in part by the relative positions of the Wings 26' and 28' that is preselected by'proper tyingofthetake-up means 32. Similarly, adjustment of the tying'tapes'3'2' and'the straps 74, predetermines the position o'f"the" head relative to the body with regardtoangularlty. In"this'respect.it is to'be noted that the straps74"may be adjusted to varying lengths;'thereby tilting the'headof the user to any desired angularity. Still further, thecondition'of' the patient will determine also the tightness of the chin' strap 78' which will in turn determine the extentfbfpermitted movement of the chihwithihthecupdi.

The cervical collarahove describedflias unversal application because of"its"vers'atility of adjustment, and although it is fully capable ofproviding'a firm and rather rigid supportfor'the head to hold it'against' swinging and tiltingmovement', as well as toelevatelthe-head offthe spineandniuscleswhere necessary, it is also comfortable because of the"inherent'flexibility of the material from which it is'made and because of the resiliency of the stays 84, 86, 9B and 92 that automatically take an arched condition conforming to the concavo-convex' configurations of head engaging means and back-engaging means 54 when the collar is strapped in place, as' shown in Figs. 1* andZ.

The collar 10 is firmly supported and heldagainstldi'splacementby virtue of concavities 36 and 38- engaging and straddling the shoulders of'the user. by apron ZTresti'ng' upon the users breast. and bythe'fiaps"60' and 62 engagingthe back of the user immediately below'th'e neck. "Similarly; the headisiheld comfortably ill-place because of its being saddled"al'ong;the entire. uppermost marginal" edge -of the. band '10. To this end, the two tongues scene "58' bear against the back. of the head. as shown iirFig. 2", thememhers70land72 embrace the-chin, the jaw" rests within the collar .10. alonglthe concavi'ties'40 and 42;"aitdi1the c'liin off the user irests firmly within. the cup'filias" it is held in place by.tlie.chin strap.78 and as thedat't'e'rholds themembers 70and .72. tightly against: the sid'esof the chin.

While. strap 78 is shown disposed across the chin in Fig. 1, it may cradle the chin therebelow, depending on the conditions of the patient, to thereby cooperate with cup 64 in more firmly holding the head against forward tipping, since the chin may be extended through the openings 66 and 68 to overliecthe strap 78 thus disposed.

An important advantageof cup 64 and tongues 56 and 68 is that of comfortable support for the head as distinguishediirom.collarsipreviously used whereinia rather sharp cuttingedge: is presented beneath thelower jaw and base of tlie head. Similarly, the apron 22 and the flaps 60 and 62-take the weight off the shoulders at concavities 36andr38; eliminating the. sharp edge-cutting effect that is presented by conventional collars. In fact, collars of this nature have heretofore'been designed and used previously as protecting means rather than as supports for the head, and when attempt has been made to utilize the same to holdlthe. headin'any predetermined position, they have the aforementionediinherent.disadvantages.

Collar 'lfltneed be'made in only a few different sizes and can'tofacourse; b'e modified by custoinfabricationito suit the: needs of. the particular individual. For instance, if the: attending physiciani desires that the patient bepermitteditoimove his=headz forwardly, the apron 22 may be omitted.. Conversely, .if backward tipping of the head is to be permitted, the tongues 56-58 and/or the flaps 6D-62 m'ay/be elirninatedi Still. further alterations-to suit particular conditions may be: made: through proper use of stays 80; 84, and. 94:. For i'nstance,.bycchoosing stays Mand 84 of higher degrees. ofzres-iliencyl than stays 90 and 94, forward movement: of. thexliead becomes easier than backward movement thereof (Conversely, staysSOand 84 maybe stiffer than the; stays- 9'01 and 94. Additionally, stays- Bil andS l or stays 90 and 94may be omitted entirely inappropriate cases.

weakened musclesor other defective conditionsmay also be supportedorrectified with respect to side move-- ment of thehead. If the headis to be held tilted to the rightfor instance ,.staysz84and 90 may either be eliminated or chosen of more resilient material than opposed stays 86 and 92. Thus, one or more of the stays may be employed or they mayallbe'eliminated.

It can now be seen that the. cervical collar of this invention is capable of wide use. for virtually all conditions wherein bracing of this type is employed, thereby practically obviating the necessity ofresort to heavy, expensive, cumbersome and uncomfortable metal braces which many patients cannot possibly tolerate.

While many details of construction of the'cervical collar forming the subject matterof this invention have necessarily been setforth to provide a full and complete understandingofthe inve'ntion, it is to be understood that many changes and modifications maybe made particularly in such details of construction Within the spirit of the invention without departing from the scope ofthe appended claims;

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as=new and desired'to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A cervical collar-comprising'a band split at the-back thereof and having a pairof shoulder-straddlingportions, said band having a closed front portion covering the neck below the chin; a split, downwardly and forwardly flared breast-engaging apron integral with said front portion; and means at said back of the band for fastening the same in encircling relationship to the neck.

2. A cervical collar comprising a band having a downwardly and rearwardly flared back-engaging means,.said band being split through said means, presenting a pain of opposed, back-engagingfiaps; and means at said split for fastening the band in encircling relationship to the neck.

3. .A cervical collar comprising a band having a downwardly and rearwardly-fiared back-engaging means and an upwardly and rearWardly-flared head-engaging means, said band being split through the back-engaging means,

presenting a pair of back-engaging flaps and through said head-engaging means, presenting a pair of head-engaging tongues; aud means at said split for fastening the band in encircling relationship to the neck.

4. A cervical collar comprising a flexible, split band provided with take-up means for fastening the same in encircling relationship to the neck, and a head-receiving saddle at the uppermost edge of the band, there being a pair of opposed jawbone-receiving concavities in said edge of the band, a chin-receiving slit, and a pair of spaced, head-engaging tongues at the back of the band, whereby said edge conforms to the shape of the head and face upon fastening of said take-up means.

5. A cervical collar comprising a split, flexible band adapted to encircle the neck and provided with a lowermost edge having means for supporting the b and including a pair of shoulder-straddling concavities, additional support means including a pair of back-engaging flaps, a head-receiving saddle at the uppermost edge of the band, and take-up means for fastening the band to the neck and varying the position of the flaps to hold the head in preselected positions relative to'the users body.

6. A cervical collar comprising a split, flexible band adapted to encircle the neck and provided with a lowermost edge having means for supporting the band including a pair of shoulder-straddling concavities, additional support means including a pair of back-engaging flaps, a head-receiving saddle at the uppermost edge of the band, said saddle including a pair of head-engaging tongues above the flaps, and take-up means for fastening the band to the neck and varying the positions of the flaps relative to the tongues to hold the head in preselected positions relative to the users body.

7. A cervical collar comprising a split, flexible band adapted to encircle the neck and provided with a lowermost edge having means for supporting the band including a pair of shoulder-straddling concavities, additional support means including a pair of breast-engaging wings and a pair of back-engaging flaps in opposed relationship to the wings, a head-receiving saddle at the uppermost edge of the band, said saddle including a slit in the band having a closed bottom, presenting a chin-receiving cup, a pair of head-engaging tongues in opposed relationship to the cup, take-up means for fastening the band to the neck and varying the positions of the flaps and the tongues to hold the head in preselected positions relative to the users body, and a chin strap adjacent the cup provided with take-up means for varying the position of the chin in the cup.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Rosenblum July 3, 1934 OTHER REFERENCES Orthopaedic Appliance Atlas, published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in 1952, pp. 232 and 240.

The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery for January 1952, advertising p. 10.

The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery for January 1954, advertising p. 24.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification602/18, 128/DIG.230
International ClassificationA61F5/055
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/23, A61F5/055
European ClassificationA61F5/055