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Publication numberUS2818087 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1957
Filing dateJul 23, 1956
Priority dateJul 23, 1956
Publication numberUS 2818087 A, US 2818087A, US-A-2818087, US2818087 A, US2818087A
InventorsNichols Edward C
Original AssigneeDraper Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loom temple
US 2818087 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 31, 1957 E. C. NICHOLS LOOM TEMPLE Filed July 25, 1956 INVENTOR. EDWARD -C. N|CHOLS A TTORNE Y LOOM TEMPLE Edward C. Nichols, Upton, Mass., assignor to Draper Corporation, Hopedale, Mass, a corporation of Maine Application July 23, 1956, Serial No. 599,372 Claims. (Cl. 139-293) This invention pertains to loom temples and, more particularly, to improvements in temples of the gripping jaw type.

It is an object of the invention to devise a temple which shall be simple, inexpensive and effective in that it will grip and hold fabrics as woven without slipping and yet will have no adverse effect upon the fabric such as results from the use of various temples using pins which pierce the cloth in order to hold it.

A further object is that of devising a temple which will grip the cloth much closer to the fell and thus which will be approached much more closely by the reed at beat-up.

Another object is that of devising a temple which shall maintain a lower warp line especially at those times when the filling carrier enters and when it leaves the shed.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a temple in which various gripping surfaces may be employed depending upon the material to be held and which shall hold securely but without damage to the fabric.

Further objects will be apparent from the following disclosure.

In weaving it is necessary to maintain the width of cloth being woven and for that purpose, temples of various types are used. For the most part these are of rotary type and utilize one or more rolls the surface structure of which is adapted to grip or hold the fabric by its edges more or less securely. These rolls are covered with rubber, cork, leather or other materials and in many cases are provided with pins which actually project into and through the cloth. Of course, these leave small holes in the cloth or in some cases tear out a larger opening if the pull of the cloth is sufiicient. While the smoother surfaced rolls do not often damage the fabric, they will not hold a fabric in which the tension is very great.

Roller temples have other shortcomings, for example, since the diameter of a practical roll is about /s to A of an inch, it is not practical to hold the fabric nearer than about of an inch from the fell or reed as the latter beats a pick into the fell. This gives rise to wear on the warp and causes the filling to be strained since the fabric contracts too much and so-called button holes" are sometimes experienced.

Again this same dimensional limitation is a disadvantage since the temple must pass above the shuttle race with fair clearance and results in a high warp line at the time the shuttle or other filling carrier enters or leaves the shed. Often the raised warp threads affect the path of the carrier imparting to it an erratic flight.

According to the instant invention, a clamping jaw type temple has been devised which obviates to a very great extent the above noted objectionable features of rotary temples. This novel temple may be applied to any loom by mounting upon the usual sliding bar support or upon a pivoted arm hinged below the warp line or otherwise. It comprises a pair of jaws, a fixed one of which is of very thin section and a movable jaw cooperating therewith to be guided in a path which is disposed at an acute angle to the length of the fixed jaw and is also spring urged along that pathway to engage the fabric against the fixed jaw. As the fabric tends to contract and pull against the jaws which may have their gripping surfaces roughened in some one of many ways, the jaws grip more tightly. A spring is used to maintain the movable jaw in gripping relationship, but is not of any great strength so that the cloth may easily open the jaws enough to give them a new grip to maintain their hold and the maximum width of cloth as weaving progresses.

The invention will be described in detail by reference to a preferred embodiment and modification thereof as illustrated in the accompanying figures of drawing, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a section taken through a loom to which the invention has been applied.

Fig. 2 is an elevation of part of the mechanism of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a section taken along the length. of a temple according to the invention.

Fig. 4 is a section taken transversely of the temple as at 4-4, Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a view taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 6 similar to that of Fig. 3, but showing a modification.

Fig. 6 isan end view of the modified temple.

Now referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the invention is shown as applied to an underslung temple mounting of the type in United States Patent 2,598,882. The temple generally indicated by numeral 10 is attached by screws 11 to an arm 12 clamped or otherwise fixed to a shaft 13 which is supported within a torsion bearing 14 held in the clamping end 15 of a bracket 16. The latter is bolted to the loomside 17 or to some other part of the framework.

The torsion bushings as explained in the patent above noted, always bias the shaft and arms to press the temples toward the fell of the cloth. This action is limited by a stop means which comprises at each side of the loom, an arm 18 clamped to shaft 13 and adapted to engage a rubber, leather of similar bumping surface 19 through an abutment screw 20 adjustable and locked in position by a nut 21. At this point it should be mentioned that while only one side of the loom is illustrated, parts are duplicated at the opposite side and thus the disclosure should be understood to apply to both temple units which may be mounted on the same common shaft, or if the design of the loom so dictates, on separate shafts.

As beat-up occurs, a lay 22 carrying a reed 23 and shuttle race 24 is moved to the position of Fig. 1, in which a leather or other buffer 25 engages a part of the temple and pushes it forwardly. Of course, the setting is such that the reed may not contact the temple although they approach very closely.

Now, referring to Figs. 3 and 4 also, the temple comprises among other parts a support or stand member 26 suitably formed to attach to the upper end of arm 12, and a temple top 27 which is fixed in position by screw 28. A tongue and groove serve to position the stand on the arm and a second tongue and groove between the stand and temple top serve a similar purpose. A small screw 29 holds the top in intended endwise position.

A fixed jaw 30 is attached to a lower surface of the stand by any convenient means such as rivets 31. This jaw is of thin section and its cloth engaging surface 32 may be roughened in one of several ways, for example, the shallow teeth shown. These point outwardly or in opposition to the direction of pull on the cloth.

This surface is inclined so that the edge nearest the fell of the cloth is very thin and thus the warp line is much lower, approaching to within /s inch of the race plate as against at least A of an inch for roller type temples. As can be seen in Fig. 1, the lower side of this jaw just clears the race plate at beat-up.

A movable jaw 33 shaped as illustrated is movable along the direction of a guide pin 34 which is disposed at an acute angle to the length of the jaws. This jaw is likewise formed with teeth or the like to cooperate with those at the fixed jaw. A shoulder 35 on the temple top restrains the jaw 33 to move in a plane transverse to the length of the fabric held. The jaw is also made with its gripping surface angled oppositely to that of jaw 30.

Pin 34 is held in jaw 33 by brazing or by some other convenient means and is freely slidable in a guiding bore in top 27. A spring 36 is under compression being held in a hollow end of pin 34 and by a screw 37 by which it may be adjusted. The top 27 is extended upwardly in a boss 38 to accommodate these parts.

The ends of the jaws are rounded and formed to diverge as at 39 and 40 to make it easy to enter the fabric and to present smooth surfaces past which the fabric may move. The fabric may be entered between the jaws, but when pulled inwardly of the 100m or from the temple the movable jaw is pulled inwardly, but must also move toward and into clamping engagement with the fixed jaw since it mus move in a direction as governed by the guide pin 34. The fabric cannot be drawn outwardly much beyond the end of jaw 33 since the adjacent face of the stand 26 acts as a limiting stop.

in Figs. and 6, a modification involves a different means to guide the movable jaw and the angle at which the movable member is permitted to recede from the fixed jaw is considerably less. Holding power is thus increased.

A stand 41 similar to that first described has attached in a similar way, the fixed jaw 42. A movable jaw 43 of wedge form is retained in position by a pressed metal or other cap 44 which is bent down at its sides as at 45 and 46 to present a channel in which the jaw 43 may slide. The cap is fastened to the stand by one or more screws 47 and as it is also tapered as shown to conform to the wedge shape of the jaw 43, movement of the latter as pulled by the fabric results in a strong clamping force to hold it. A spring 48 the ends of which are set in drilled holes in the adjacent faces of the stand and jaw is under compression and always urges the movable member into or toward engagement with the fixed memher.

The cooperating jaw surfaces are inclined as in the form above described and also may be provided with teeth, serrations, scratches, or may be smooth, depending upon material to be held and other factors. Again,

one face may be scored or serrated in some suitable way while the opposite is left smooth.

The jaws are preferably made of steel or other metal, but may be of a suitable plastic such, for example, as nylon or Teflon in which event they may be molded or molded and then machined at some surfaces.

The fact that the holdingsurfaces actually approach the reed to as near as of an inch, permits the fabric to be held at a width very near to that of the width of the warp in the reed. Thus the slight contraction lessens the wear of the end warp thread at the reed. Also there is less strain on the filling which is not allowed to contract the cloth as much as it may where the grip is established at a greater distance from the reed.

Again, the fact the warp line is maintained about to /2 inch lower at the temples permits a better shuttle flight or interferes less with a filling carrier of any other type.

There are no pins to enter the cloth and yet the holding power is much greater than possible with rollers of any nature which do not have pins. The fact only a single set of jaws is needed and that the pathway of the fabric is in a straight line through them constitutes an advantage over all roller temples, especially multi-roll types in which the cloth edge is corrugated as it passes and therefore tends to be stretched.

While one embodiment and a modification of the invention have been disclosed, it is to be understood that the inventive concept may be carried out in a number of ways. This invention is, therefore, not to be limited to the precise details described, but is intended to embrace all variations and modifications thereof falling within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the claims.

I claim:

1. In a loom temple of the type described, a supporting stand, a fixed jaw attached to said stand as a lower fabric gripping member, a movable jaw constituting a second fabric gripping member guided between said lower jaw and a part of said stand, guide means for said movable jaw permitting it to move at an acute angle to said fixed jaw to and from a fabric gripping relationship therewith, and resilient means urging said movable jaw in a direction to engage and grip a fabric in cooperation with the fixed jaw.

2. In a m temple of the type described, a supporting stand, a fixed jaw attached to said stand as a lower fabric gripping member, a movable jaw constituting a second fabric gripping member guided between said lower jaw and a part of said stand, guide means along which said movable jaw is constrained to move in substantially a rectilinear pathway and at an acute angle to said fixed jaw to and from a fabric gripping relationship therewith, and resilient means urging said movable jaw in a direction to engage and grip a fabric in cooperation with the fixed jaw.

3. In a loom temple of the type described, a supporting stand, a fixed jaw attached to said stand as a lower fabric gripping member, a movable jaw constituting a second fabric gripping member guided between said lower jaw and a part of said stand, guide means by which said movable jaw is constrained to move at an acute angle to the length of said fixed jaw which comprises a pin extending from the movable jaw, a temple top fixed to said stand and a guiding bore therein within which said pin is slidable, and resilient means urging said movable jaw in a direction to engage and grip a fabric in cooperation with the fixed jaw.

4. In a loom temple of the type described, a supporting stand, a fixed jaw attached to said stand as a lower fabric gripping member, a movable jaw constituting a second fabric gripping member guided between said lower jaw and a part of said stand, guide means by which said movable jaw is constrained to move at an acute angle to the length of said fixed jaw which comprises a channeled cap within which said movable jaw may slide, and resilient means urging said movable jaw in a direction to engage and grip a fabric in cooperation with the fixed jaw.

5. A temple as defined in claim 4 wherein said movable jaw is of wedge shape and the cap correspondingly tapered to cause the movable jaw to be forced toward the fixed jaw as it is moved under the influence of said resilient means.

Levalley et a1. Aug. 6, 1861 Mason Apr. 23, 1895

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US33000 *Aug 6, 1861 Necticut
US538116 *Oct 13, 1894Apr 23, 1895 Loom-temple
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4578845 *Jun 21, 1982Apr 1, 1986Young Engineering, Inc.Web edge decurling device
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/293, 29/241
International ClassificationD03J1/00, D03J1/22
Cooperative ClassificationD03J1/22
European ClassificationD03J1/22