Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2818582 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1958
Filing dateSep 8, 1953
Priority dateSep 8, 1953
Publication numberUS 2818582 A, US 2818582A, US-A-2818582, US2818582 A, US2818582A
InventorsRosselle Charles C
Original AssigneeRosselle Charles C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Local vent for toilet
US 2818582 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7, 1958 c. c. ROSSELLE LOCAL VENT FOR TOILET 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 8, 1955 Jan. 7, 1958 c. c. ROSSELLE 2,813,582

LOCAL VENT FOR TOILET Filed Sept. 8, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR. C Z4712 s C fiasse/Ze United. States Patent r LOCAL VENT FOR Ttl llLlE'li Charles Q. Rosselle, Detroit, Mich Application September 8, 1953, Serial No. 373,924

Claims. (Cl. 4-213) This invention relates to improvements in a vent mechanism for toilet bowls and has for an important object the provision of an improved simple and economical mechanism of the foregoing nature which is particularly adapted to be readily installed with the usual toilet bowl having the customary vertically swinging seat.

Another object is to provide a vent mechanism for toilet bowls adapted to employ an electrically powered pump or like device automatically operative to vent gases from the toilet bowls when the seat thereof is occupied, yet which requires no electrical connections or switch means in the environs of the bowl. Thus such connections or switch means are feasibly mounted within a wall, attic, basement or other locality remote from the customary moisture of the bathroom, whereby corrosion of the electrical connections and the danger of accidental bodily contact therewith are avoided.

Another object is to provide such a vent mechanism including simple, improved hinge means for connecting the seat to the bowl, whereby the portions of the vent mechanism adjacent the bowl are inconspicuous and unobjectionable.

Another object is to provide an improved vent mechanism for a toilet bowl having a hinged seat comprising a vent conduit having an inlet and valve means adjacent the bowl intermediate rear portions of the bowl and seat. The valve means normally closes the inlet, but is shiftable by engagement with the seat and bowl to open the inlet for venting gases from the bowl when the seat is moved downward to its normal position of use adjacent the bowl. A power operated pump connected with the vent conduit is normally operative to exhaust gases therethrough from said inlet.

In consequence when the seat is not in use, the inlet is normally closed and a low pressure develops in the conduit, causing pressure controlled means connected with the conduit to shut off the pump. As soon as the seat is moved downward in use toward the bowl, the inlet to the vent conduit is opened and the low pressure in the conduit tends to return to atmospheric pressure, causing the pressure controlled means to connect the pump with the power for venting gases from the bowl. As long as the seat is occupied, the inlet will be open and the pressure in the vent conduit cannot fall to the predetermined low valve at which the pump is shut off, so that the pump will continue to operate, venting gases from the inlet. By virtue of such a construction, the pump is feasibly located remotely from the bowl, avoiding objectionable sound from its operation in the bathroom. Likewise no electrical wiring or switches need be located in the bathroom nor dangerously adjacent plumbing or water that is frequently splashed around the bathroom.

Another object is to provide an improved seat for a toilet bowl adapted for use with a vent mechanism of the foregoing character and having a hollow portion opening adjacent its bottom through a plurality of vent openings spaced around the bowl, the seat also confining therein a vent conduit and valve means normally blocking ice communication between the hollow portion of the seat and the inner end of the vent conduit. As aforesaid the valve means is provided with operating portions shiftable with respect to the seat by engageemnt with the bowl to establish communication between said hollow seat portion and vent conduit upon downward movement of the seat to its normal position of use adjacent the bowl. The other or outer end of the vent conduit is adapted to be connected with a power operated pump normally operative to exhaust gases from the vent conduit and controlled by the pressure therein as aforesaid so as to be inoperative when the pressure in the vent conduit is reduced to a predetermined low value.

Other objects of this invention will appear in the following description and appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts in the several views.

Fig. l is a fragmentary and partially schematic view showing a water closet assembly in side elevation and a vent mechanism embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged section taken in the direction of the arrows substantially along the line 3-3 Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged view taken in the direction of the arrows substantially along the line 5-5 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary schematic View showing a section of the vent conduit and the pump control mechanism.

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 3, showing a modification of the present invention.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary section taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 8-8 of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary bottom view of a toilet seat structure embodying still another modification of the present invention.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary enlarged section taken in the direction of the arrows substantially along the line 10-10 of Fig. 9.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring particularly to Figs. 1 through 6, an example of a typical water closet assembly is shown comprising a toilet bowl l9 suitably connected with a reservoir 20 and the usual plumbing including a vent stack 21 located within the bathroom wall 22. Such a structure may be conventional and accordingly is not described in further detail.

Mounted on the bowl 19 is a seat 23 of customary shape pivotal on a horizontal transverse pivot rod 24 adjacent the rear of the seat 23. The rod 24 is connected at opposite ends to the seat 23 by a pair of lateral brackets or hinge straps 25 having portions recessed into'the underside of the seat and secured thereto by screws 26, Fig. 5. Adjacent and inward of each bracket 25 is one of each of a pair of hinge supporting members 27 spacing each end bracket 25 from one of each of a pair of intermediate hinge members 28 pivotal on the rod 24 and adapted to be connected with the usual seat cover, not shown.

Each member 27 comprises an upper enlarged body having a depending shank 27a projecting through a lateral boss 29 of the bowl 19 and secured thereto by a nut 30. The base of the body comprises a horizontal shoulder 27b projecting forwardly from the upper end of the shank 27a and resting on the upper surface of the bowl 19. The portion of the member 27 immediately above the shoulder 27b is provided with a vertically elongated pivot hole 31 through which the rod 24 extends. The latter is normally maintained at the upper portion of the slot 31 by resilient means, but is adapted to be moved downward in the slot 31 upon the application of sutlicient force on the seat 23, all as described below.

interposed between the rear portions of the bowl 19 and seat 23 along the mid-plane thereof is a valve assembly indicated generally by the numeral 32. and supported on the upper portion of the bowl 19. The assembly 32 includes a lower housing 33 having a dome shaped chamber 34 therein opening downward and closed by a screw plug 35, Fig. 3. The top of the chamber 36 is provided with a vent inlet opening 36 and comprises an annular seat for a disc valve or plunger 37 underlying portions of the housing 33 below the inlet 36. A coil spring 38 under compression between the plug 35 and valve plunger 37 normally urges the latter upward to close the inlet opening 36.

Upper marginal flanges 33a of the housing 33 at the back and both sides comprise a vertical guideway for a vertically shiftable operator 39. The latter is spaced above and secured to the plunger 37 by a screw 46, whereby the operator 39 is vertically shiftable within the space 41 therebelow, which enlarges and opens forwardly to the atmosphere via recesses 42 and 43 in the confronting forward portions of the housing 33 and operator 39.

Immediately underlying the rod 24 are a pair of coaxial screw threaded openings 44 of equal diameter which open into the chamber 34 through opposite lateral sidewalls of the housing 33 and receive a pair of rods or shafts 45 and 46 screwed thereinto. The rods 45 and 46 project laterally from the housing 33 in opposite directions and extend snugly through coaxial openings 47 in the member 27, whereby the rods 45-46 and housing 33 are maintained in fixed relationship with respect to the bowl 19.

In the present instance, the rod 46 is solid and comprises a plug for its opening 44. The rod 45 is tubular and comprises part of a vent conduit opening at one end into chamber 34. The other end of the tubular rod 45 is connected to a vent conduit 48 by a coupling 49, whereby gases vented from the bowl 19 through opening 36 can be discharged at any convenient location remote from the bathroom, as for example to the basement, attic, or exterior of existing houses, or into the stack 21 as shown where such is accessible, as for example in the construction of new buildings. The rods 45 and 46 are interchangeable, permitting the conduit 48 to be mounted at either side of the bowl 19 in accordance with the requirements of the installation.

Gases are vented from the bowl 1Q by a power operated pump 50 operated by a suitable power means, as for example an electric motor 51. The pump 50 is connected to the conduit .8, between the stack 21 and inlet 36, as for example within the wall 22, so that the noise of pump operation will not be objectionable. Operation of the pump 50 is controlled in accordance with the pressure in conduit 48 by suitable pressure responsive means, as for example a pressure switch indicated generally by the numeral 52, Fig. 6.

The pressure switch 52 in the present instance comprises a pair of oppositely dished shells 52a and 52b having marginal flanges spaced by a flexible diaphragm 53 and securely clamped together by a plurality of rivets 54. The diaphragm 53 partitions the space between the shells 52a and 52b into two distinct compartments and is reinforced by a pair of washers 55 and 56 suitably secured to opposite sides of its central portion. A coil spring 57 within the compartment at one side of the diaphragm 53 yieldingly maintains the latter at a central position between the shells 52a and 52b, the latter compartment being connected by a conduit 58 to the conduit 46 at a location intermediate the pump 50 and inlet 36. A plunger shaft 59 secured to the washers 55 and 56 extends oppositely from the spring 5''? through the shell 52a and supports a coil spring 60 seated against a transverse pin 61 secured to shaft 59 adjacent the latters outer end.

The spring 60 extends coaxially endwise from the shaft and supports a shiftable electrical contact element 62. The latter is yieldingly urged against a fixed electrical contact element 63 by the force of spring 66 when the diaphragm 53 is adjacent its central location indicated in Fig. 6. Upon the development of a predetermined low pressure in the conduit ift, the flexible diaphragm 53 is shifted toward the shell 52b, causing he plunger 59 and contact element 62 to shift correspondingly away from the contact 63, thereby breaking the electrical circuit containing the electrical power supply 64 for motor 51.

By virtue of the foregoing construction, when the seat 23 is not occupied it is normally maintained by spring 33 at the position shown in Fig. 3 whereat inlet 36 is closed by plunger 37. Upon operation of motor 51, the pump 50 will exhaust gases from conduit 48 until the pressure switch 52 breaks the contact between the elements 62 and 63, causing de-activation of motor 51 and pump 50.

Many common types of pumps suitable for use herein are adapted to pump in one direction only and to prevent the reverse flow of gases when the pump is inoperative. Where such a pump is not employed, a suitable means such as the check-valve 65 is provided to prevent back flow of gases into the portion of the conduit 48 contain ing the duct 58. Thus as long as the inlet 36 remains closed, diaphragm 53 will remain depressed toward the shell 52b and the contacts 62 and 63 will remain open. As soon as the seat is 23 occupied, the weight thereon will force the operator 39 downward to the extent permitted by the space 41 and slot 31, causing plunger 37 to move downward and open inlet 36.

Gases then entering the chamber 34 through inlet 36 are conveyed by conduits 45 and 43 to duct 58, permitting diaphragm 53 to return substantially to its normal position, Fig. 6, thereby closing the contacts 62 and 63 and energizing motor 51 to start pump 50. As long as inlet 36is open, operation of pump 50 cannot develop a sufliciently low pressure in conduits 48 and 58 to open or separate contactors 62 and 63. As soon as the seat 23 is permitted to return to its upper position, Fig. 3, closing inlet 36, the pressure in ducts 48 and 58 will be reduced sutficiently to cause opening of the contacts 62 and 63, stopping pump 56 as aforesaid.

A modification of a valve assembly suitable for use with the present invention is illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8 wherein the plumbing and relationship between the bowl 19 and seat 23 are the same as illustrated in Figs. 1 through 5. The valve shown in Figs. 7 and 8 comprises a housing 66 supported on the rear upper surface of the bowl 19 along the midline thereof and below the seat 23 in the manner of the valve assembly 32. The bottom of the housing 66 is recessed at 67 so as to provide a forwardly opening space above the bowl 19 comparable to the flared opening 42, 43.

Opening upwardly from the recess 67 is a chamber 68 within the housing 66 having a lower upwardly tapered conical valve seat portion 69 for a valve plunger '70. The latter is secured to the lower end of a vertically shiftable operating shaft 71 which extends slidably upward through the housing 66 and terminates in an enlarged head '72. Underlying the head 72 is an upwardly bowed leaf spring '73 having a central opening '74, of smaller dimensions than the head 72, through which the shaft 71 extends. The lower ends of the bowed spring 73 fit within an upwardly opening slot 75 recessed into the top of the housing 68, whereby the spring 73 is adapted to be flattened by downward movement of the head 72. The latter immediately underlies the rear portion of the seat 23 and is depressed when the seat is occupied, shifting plunger 70 downward to open the inlet into chamber 68. Also immediately underlying the pivot rod 24 and opening into the chamber 68 through opposite lateral sidewalls of the housing 66 are coaxial screw threaded bores 44a for the conduit 45 and solid rod 46 which serve in the manner as above described.

The above described valve assemblies can be readily installed with existing water closets upon replacing the conventional supports for the pivot rod 45 by the members 27 shown. A modification of the present invention which provides for replacement of the entire seat 23 by a seat '76 containing a valve assembly as an integral feature thereof is illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10. The seat 76 is conventional in overall exterior design and is pivotally connected to the rod 24 by the customary brackets or hinge straps 25 secured to the underside of the seat by the screws 26. The seat '76 can be formed from molded plastic in accordance with the customary practice and is provided with a hollow interior which is sealed from the exterior except at a plurality of small openings 79 through the bottom of the seat structure adjacent and spaced around the inner periphery thereof. As indicated, the openings 79 are preferably more closely spaced toward the rear of seat than toward the front.

Located within the front portion of the seat 76 along its midline is a cylindrical valve housing or chamber 80 suitably secured within the body of the seat as for example by being molded therein. The housing 88 is closed at its upper end by a plate 81 and opens downwardly through the bottom of the seat '76. Spaced from the lower end of the housing 88 is a screw plug 82 which screws upward into a lower internally threaded enlarged portion 83 of the interior of the housing 80. A second internally threaded enlargement 84 at the bottom of the housing 80 below the plug 82. retains a bottom screw plug 85. The space 86 between the plugs 82 and 85 opens through the wall of the housing 80 and into the hollow interior of the seat 76 via a number of openings 87.

The plug 82 is provided with an upwardly diverging conical inlet 88 having a mating valve plunger 89 seated therein and normally held downward to close the inlet 88 by means of a coil spring 98 under compression between the plunger 09 and top plate 81. Secured to the plunger 89 is a depending stem 91 which projects slidably through a bumper 92 of rubber-like material secured to the underside of the plug 85. The lower end of the stem 91 is secured to a second bumper 93 adapted to engage the top of the bowl 19 so as to force the stem 91 upward and open the inlet 88 when the seat 76 is occupied. Otherwise the spring 98 urges the stem 91 downward with sufficient force to maintain the inlet 88 closed even though the bumper 93 is resting on the upper edge of the bowl 19.

Connected to the interior of the chamber 88 above the plug 82 is a conduit 94 which extends to the rear of the seat '76 within the interior thereof and opens to the exterior through a fitting 95. The latter is adapted to be connected by any suitable flexible means to the conduit 48 to provide vent means for the bowl 119 as above described. In the present instance a flexible conduit 96 is connected at one end with the fitting 95 and is connected at its other end to the conduit 8 by a coupling 97. Thus the seat 76 is freely pivotal.

In operation of the device illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10, when the seat 76 is not occupied, the valve plunger 89 is held downward by the spring 90, blocking communication between the hollow interior of the seat 76 and the conduit 9 5. In consequence upon operation of pump 50 as aforesaid, conduit as will be evacuated and motor 50 will 6 shut off at the predetermined low pressure at which the contacts 62 and 63 separate. When the seat 76 is occupied, it is forced downward toward the bowl, shifting stem 91 upward and opening the inlet 88. Gases are then vented from the bowl 19 through the bottom seat openings 79, openings 87, inlet 88, and conduits 94, 96 and 48, relieving the low pressure within the conduits 48 and 58 and permitting the pump 50 to resume operation upon closure of the contacts 62, 63.

An important feature of the present invention apparent from the foregoing is its ready adaptability for use in buildings containing any number of water closets, since vent inlets from any number of toilet bowls can be connected to the conduit 48. The single pump 50 controlled by pressure in the header 48 as described above will operate automatically whenever said pressure rises to a value predetermined by the setting of pressure switch 52. It is only necessary that the capacity of pump 50 and conduit 48 be adequate to vent all of the toilet bowls connected thereto that might be in use simultaneously.

I claim:

1. In a vent mechanism for a toilet bowl, a toilet seat adapted to be hingedly connected to said bowl, said seat having a hollow portion and a plurality of openings in communication with said hollow portion through the bottom of said seat, a vent conduit having an inlet opening into said hollow portion to vent gases therefrom, power operated means for exhausting gases from said conduit, pressure controlled means in communication with said conduit and responsive to a predetermined low pressure therein to stop operation of said power operated means, valve means carried by said seat and normally closing said inlet, and operating means for said valve means cooperable with said seat to open said inlet upon predetermined movement of said seat toward said bowl.

2. In a vent mechanism for a toilet bowl, a toilet seat adapted to be hingedly connected to said bowl, said seat having a hollow portion and a plurality of openings in communication with said hollow portion through the bottom of said seat, a vent conduit having an inlet opening into said hollow portion to vent gases therefrom, power operated means for exhausting gases from said conduit, pressure controlled means in communication with said conduit and responsive to a predetermined low pressure therein to stop operation of said power operated means, valve means carried by said seat for said inlet, operating means for said valve means shiftable in one direction with respect to said seat by engagement with said bowl and connected with said valve means to open said inlet upon predetermined movement of said seat toward said bowl, and resilient means yieldingly urging shifting of said operating means oppositely to said one direction to close said valve means.

3. in a vent mechanism for a toilet bowl, a toilet seat adapted to be hingedly connected to said bowl, said seat having a hollow portion and an opening into said hollow portion adjacent the bottom of said seat, a vent conduit confined within the body of said seat, said conduit having an outlet opening exteriorly of said seat, said conduit also having an inlet opening into said hollow portion to vent gases therefrom, power operated means for discharging gases from within said conduit through said outlet, pressure controlled means in communication with said conduit and responsive to a predetermined low pressure therein to stop operation of said power operated means, valve means carried by said seat and normally closing said inlet, and operating means for said valve means cooperable with said seat to open said inlet upon predetermined movement of said seat toward said bowl.

4. In a vent mechanism for a toilet bowl, a toilet seat adapted to be hingedly connected to said bowl, said seat having a hollow portion and a plurality of openings in communication with said hollow portion through the bottom of said seat, a vent conduit confined within the t having an outlet opening body of said seat, said con conduit also having an inlet opening into said hollow portion adjacent the front of said seat, power operated means for discharging gases from within said conduit through said outlet, pressure controlled means in communication with said conduit and responsive to a predetermined low pressure therein to stop operation of said power operated means, valve means carried by said seat and normally closing said inlet and being 0perable to open said inlet upon predetermined movement of said seat toward said bowl.

5. In a vent mechanism for a toilet bowl, a toilet seat hingedly connected to said bowl, said seat having a hollow portion and plurality of openings in communication with said hollow portion through the bottom of said seat, an interior vent conduit confined within the body of said seat and having :an inlet opening into said hollow portion adjacent the front of said seat, valve means carried by said seat and normally closing said inlet, operating means for said valve means shiftable with respect to said seat by engagement with said bowl and connected with said valve means to open said inlet upon predetermined movement of said seat tow d said bowl, an exterior vent conduit, flexible means connecting one end of said exterior conduit with said interior conduit adjacent the rear of said seat, check valve means in said exterior conduit to block passage of gases therethrough toward said inlet, pump means adapted to be connected with power to be operated thereby to discharge gases from said inlet through said check valve means, and means in communication with said conduit intermediate said inlet and check valve means and norma connecting said pump means with said power comprising pressure controlled means responsive to a predetermined low pressure in said conduit to block the connection between said pump means and power.

References fitted in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US747389 *Jan 8, 1901Dec 22, 1903Detroit Ventilating Company LtdVentilating device for water-closets.
US1564071 *Dec 15, 1923Dec 1, 1925Jackson Charles EVentilating closet
US2079733 *Apr 11, 1936May 11, 1937Cummings William CVentilating mechanism for toilet bowls
US2131264 *Apr 9, 1938Sep 27, 1938Pierce Governor CompanyVacuum actuated safety system for engines
US2216008 *Nov 13, 1939Sep 24, 1940Heuacker Frederick WVentilating apparatus for toilet bowls
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4893359 *Feb 17, 1989Jan 16, 1990Vu Phuc NVented toilet bowl
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/213
International ClassificationE03D9/052, E03D9/04
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/052
European ClassificationE03D9/052