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Publication numberUS2818611 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1958
Filing dateMar 2, 1955
Priority dateMar 2, 1955
Publication numberUS 2818611 A, US 2818611A, US-A-2818611, US2818611 A, US2818611A
InventorsAndree Fred Michael
Original AssigneeAndree Fred Michael
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prime and storm window combination
US 2818611 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7, 1958 F. M. ANDREE 2,813,611

PRIME AND STORM WINDOW COMBINATION Filed March 2, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I 19 25 IL... l

INVENTOR. Fred M. Andree 4 M M73744]? RNE'Y Jan. 7, 1958 EM. ANDREE PRIME AND STORM wmnow comm-non 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 2, 1955 IJI , INVENTOR. Fired M. Andree ATTOBNEY United States Patent PRIME AND STORM WINDOW COMBINATION Fred Michael Andree, Youngstown, Ohio Application March 2, 1955, Serial No. 491,629

4 Claims. (Cl. 20-55) This invention relates to windows and more particularly to a complete prime and storm window unit that may be installed in an opening in a dwelling house wall and provide a complete insulated window structure.

The principal object of the invention is the provision of a prime and storm window combination.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a complete window unit that incorporates prime and storm windows which may be moved in the manner of casements into the room in which the window is installed.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a prime and storm window combination unit incorporating casement frames, each having a pair of double hung glazed sash therein.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a prime and storm window combination incorporating spaced casement-like frames swingable into and out of the window unit and a screen sash for fixed positioning in said unit.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a prime and storm window combination unit which incorporates two pairs of double hung window assemblies in hinged frames and means providing ventilation past the outer one of the pairs of double hung window assemblies.

The prime and storm window combination disclosed herein is primarily intended for new construction in dwelling houses and the like where double hung windows are desired and the advantages of casement windows with respect to convenience in cleaning and opening, etc., are also desired.

In the present disclosure the unit includes a frame having casement-like secondary frames hinged thereto and each of the secondary casement-like frames mounts a pair of vertically slidable double hung glazed sash. Thus, either or both of the casement-like frames may be swung into the room making both sides of each of the double hung window sash therein readily available for cleaning and providing an unusual degree of access through the window frame by means of which a screened sash can be easily placed or removed in its position forwardly of the pair of casement frames.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention resides in the combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed, it being the intention to cover all changes and modifications of the example of the invention herein chosen for purposes of the disclosure, which do not constitute departures from the spirit and scope of the invention.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the prime and storm window combination showing the casement-like frames open with respect thereto.

Figure 2 is a vertical section through the lower portion ice of the window illustrated in Figure 1 and taken on line 2-2 of Figure 4.

Figure 3 is a vertical section through the complete prime and storm window combination unit.

Figure 4 is a horizontal section taken on line 4-4 of Figure 3 with parts broken away.

By referring to the drawings and Figure 1 in particular it will be seen that the prime and storm window combination unit comprises a frame including jambs 10, jamb header 11, exterior casing 12, interior casing 13 and a sill 14. The rectangular frame defined by the jambs 10, the jamb header 11 and sill 14 defines a rectangular opening in which an outer casement 15 is hingedly mounted and in which an inner casement 16 spaced with respect to the outer casement 15 is also hingedly mounted.

The outer casement 15 is actually a rectangular frame, the opposite sides and top of which are provided with parting beads 17, as best seen in Figures 3 and 4 of the drawings. tion sash slides 18 and a pair of storm sash, comprising an inner glazed storm sash 19 and an outer glazed storm sash 20, are slidably mounted in double hung relation on the friction sash slides 1818, one on either side of the parting head 17 and on the outer casement 15.

The sash 19 and 20 are best illustrated in the vertical section of Figure 3 of the drawings wherein they are shown in closed relation with their meeting rails 19A and 20A engaged one upon the other by reason of the oppositely disposed registering configuration thereof.

It will thus be seen that when the outer casement is in closed position in the rectangular opening defined by the frame of the prime and storm window combination, the storm sash 19 and 20 form a complete weather closure in the frame.

Still referring to Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings it will be observed that the sill 14 of the frame is spaced below the lower rail of the outer casement 15 and that a vent piece 21 is hinged as at 22 to the upper surface of the sill 14 and in upright position, as shown in Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings, forms an upward extension of the sill 14 registering with the lower portion of the lower rail of the outer casement 15.

Alternately, the vent piece 21 may be swung inwardly, as indicated by the dotted line, to a position adjacent the sill 14 and completely below the lower edge of the lower rail of the outer casement 15 which will permit the outer casement 15 to be swung inwardly as hereinafter described.

The inner casement 16 is larger in height and width than the outer casement 15 and its inner surface defines a larger rectangular opening and includes parting beads 23 and friction sash slides 24 on either side thereof which receive glazed sash 25 and 26 thereon in double hung vertically slidable relation, the meeting rails 25A and 26A of which are formed with oppositely disposed registering configurations engageable when the sash 25 and 26 are in closed position, as seen in Figure 3 of the drawings. It will be observed that the sash 25 and 26 form a weathertight closure with respect to the opening defined by the frame of the window unit and that they are spaced inwardly with respect to the storm sash 19 and 20 heretofore referred to.

The outer casement 15' is hinged to one of the jambs 10 by a plurality of vertically aligned hinges 2727 and the inner casement is hinged to the same jamb 10 by a plurality of vertically arranged hinges 2828.

Each of the glazed storm sash 19 and 20 is slidably mounted in the outer casement 15 on the friction sash slide 1818 in a manner so that they are retained in desired vertical adjustment. It will thus be observed that the outer casement 15 with the glazed storm sash Adjacent the parting beads 17 there are fric-- 3 19 and 20 forms a complete weather-tight closure in the opening defined by the unit when the vent piece 21 is in closed position, as shown in Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings.

The inner casement 16 with its glazed sash 2'5 and 26 frictionally adjustable therein by the friction sash slides 2424 also forms a complete weather-tight closure with respect to the opening formed in the unit and spaced inwardly of the outer casement 15.

The bottom edge of the inner casement 16 is pro vided with a longitudinally extending sealing strip 29 and the stool 30 positioned transversely on the innermost portion of the sill 14 is provided with a matching right angular sealing strip 31, the sealing strip 29 slidably engaging beneath the inner turned portion of the right angular sealing strip 31 when the inner casement frame 16 is closed.

The vertical side edges of the inner casement 16 engage against offsets on the inner oppositely disposed surfaces of the jambs 10 as does the upper horizontal edge thereof so that the inner casement 16 registers against the structure of the window unit on all four sides.

The outer casement is engaged by the vent piece 21 across its bottom edge when it is in closed position and its side edges and horizontal uppermost edge engage similarly formed offset portions in the oppositely disposed inner surfaces of the jambs 10 and a jamb header 32.

When the unit is provided with an exterior head casing 33, as best seen in Figures 1 and 3 of the drawings, the lowermost edge of which is tapered upwardly and inwardly on a diagonal line to provide an outwardly and downwardly extending portion overlying the upper edge of a similarly shaped screen sash 34, the screen sash 34 is on a common transverse plane with the exterior casing 12 and its lower edge rests upon the upper surface of the sill 14 where it is engaged by spring clips 35 and 36 attached to the upper portion of the sill 14 and the inner portion of the screen sash 34, respectively, as best seen in Figure 2 of the drawings.

It will thus be observed that when the inner and outer casements 16 and 15 are swung inwardly on their hinges 28 and 27, respectively, the screen sash 34 may be manually removed or installed through the opening in the window unit. The vertical side edges of the screen sash 34 register against filler strips 3535 on the jambs 1010 and the upper edge of the screen sash 34 registers against a breaker strip 36 mounted on the jamb header 32.

The entire prime and storm window combination will thus be seen to occupy the space of a conventional prime window with respect to height, width and thickness and to be capable of being installed in window openings in building constructions in the conventional manner.

The casement frames 15 and 16 are provided with appropriate locking hardware, as seen in Figure 1 of the drawings, enabling them to be latched in closed position if desired.

It will thus be seen that the several objects of the invention are met by the prime and storm window combination disclosed herein.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In a combination prime and storm window unit having a rectangular frame formed of oppositely disposed jambs, a sill and a jamb header, the oppositely disposed jambs having their inner surfaces formed in a plurality of steps and the jamb header having its lower surface formed in a plurality of steps, an outer casement frame hinged at one of its side edges to one of said steps on one of said jambs and an inner casement frame hinged at its side edges to another of the steps on one of said jambs, said casement frames being spaced with respect to one another, a transversely extending vent piece hinged to said sill beneath the outer casement frame and registrable therewith when in upright position and movable to a retracted position on said sill, said hinged vent piece engaging and retaining said outer casement frame when said vent piece is in upright position, a stool on said sill underlying and engaging said inner casement frame and spaced inwardly of said hinged vent piece, and registering weather strip formations on said stool and said inner casement frame.

2. The prime and storm window combination set forth in claim 1 and wherein the outer casement frame is of a lesser size than the inner casement frame and thereby movable through the area normally occupied by the inner casement frame when the same is opened.

3. A prime and storm window combination comprising a pair of spaced vertically standing oppositely disposed jambs, the inner oppositely disposed surfaces of which are stepped progressively outwardly, a sill secured to the bottoms of spaced jambs and a jamb header secured to the tops of said jambs, said sill being inclined outwardly and downwardly and said jamb header being stepped progressively downwardly and outward-1y, an outer casement frame hinged at one of its vertical side edges to the outermost step on one of said jambs and engageable in closed position against the outermost step on said jamb header and the outermost step on the other of said jambs and having its lower edge spaced above said sill, a transversely extending vent piece hinged to said sill beneath said outer casement frame, the lower edge of said outer casement frame being beveled adjacent its inner edge and the upper surface .of said vent piece being tapered to register with said beveled edge, an inner casement frame hinged to the innermost step of one of said jambs, the top edge of said innermost casement frame registering with the innermost step of said jamb header and the opposite side of said inner casement frame registering with the innermost step on the other of said jambs, a stool on said sill, the lower edge .of said inner casement frame slidably engaging said stool, said transversely extending vent piece being spaced with respect to said stool.

4. The prime and storm window combination set forth in claim 3 wherein the inner and outermost steps on said jambs and jamb header are spaced with respect to one another and wherein the vent piece on said sill beneath said outer casement frame is movable to a retracted position adjacent said stool.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 193,948 Harvey Aug. 7, 18.77 844,645 Ayres ,Feb. 19, 1907 1,013,090 Johnston et al Dec. 26, 19.11 1,192,406 Fair July 25, .1916 1,263,248 Hope Apr. 16, "1918 2,588,432 Tomsche Mar. 1:1, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 202,423 Great Britain Aug. :15, 1923

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US193948 *Mar 24, 1877Aug 7, 1877Himself And EImprovement in ventilators in the windows of buildings
US844645 *Apr 28, 1906Feb 19, 1907Milan V AyresWindow.
US1013090 *Jul 2, 1910Dec 26, 1911William JohnstonStorm-window.
US1192406 *Dec 18, 1913Jul 25, 1916George A FairCombined door or window and ventilating structure.
US1263248 *Mar 23, 1917Apr 16, 1918Henry Donald HopeCasement-window.
US2588432 *Dec 6, 1947Mar 11, 1952Carl L TomscheWindow construction
GB202423A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3170507 *Apr 8, 1963Feb 23, 1965Screens And Fabricated MetalsWindow frame and screen combinations
US3382611 *Mar 24, 1966May 14, 1968Zandelin Gustaf AdolfChild-proof window and balcony door
US4702157 *Oct 23, 1985Oct 27, 1987Comparon Jean DanielAutomatic aeration window
US5379824 *Aug 10, 1993Jan 10, 1995Hegwer Industries, Inc.Double window apparatus
US6506112 *Mar 14, 2000Jan 14, 2003Monroeville Glass Block CompanyVentilator for a glass block window and associated products
US20110030294 *Jul 10, 2010Feb 10, 2011Patrick Leonard ClarsonInterior pane units and window with interior pane
EP2146038A2 *Jul 17, 2009Jan 20, 2010Bluesteel S.r.l.Window for a double skin facade
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/67, 49/164, 160/92, 454/196
International ClassificationE06B3/26, E06B3/28, E06B3/04
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/28, E06B2003/261, E06B3/2605
European ClassificationE06B3/26C, E06B3/28