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Publication numberUS2820269 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1958
Filing dateMay 17, 1955
Priority dateMay 17, 1955
Publication numberUS 2820269 A, US 2820269A, US-A-2820269, US2820269 A, US2820269A
InventorsWolff Charles H
Original AssigneeWolff Charles H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Towel adjuster
US 2820269 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. H. WOLFF TOWEL ADJUSTER Jan. 21, 1958 Filed May 17, 1955 Chef/es H. Wolff I NVENT0R.

United States Patent TOWEL ADJUSTER Charles H. Wolff, Norristown, Pa. Application May 17, 1955, Serial No. 508,947 6 Claims. (Cl. 24-9) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in support devices, and more specifically to a support or adjuster for a towel.

In the rendering of many professional services, especially in the dental profession, there is the necessity for a towel to be held up under a patients chin and partially neck and clipped to a towel and so constructed whereby 1 it will hold the towel in the proper position with respect to a patient notwithstanding the fact that the patients may vary in size and move around in different positions.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved towel adjuster which includes a central neck engaging portion having telescoped therein extensible members with clips at opposite ends thereof for engaging a towel, the extensible members being anchored to the center of the neck engaging portions and being extendable equally in opposite directions in the center thereof in order that the towel may be retained in a centered position.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved towel adjuster which incorporates a coil spring for holding a towel end in adjusted center position, the coil spring being encased in sheaths so as to prevent the individual loops or convolutions of the spring from catching in ones skin when the coil spring retracts.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved clip for engaging a towel, the clip being of a relatively simple construction and at the same time so formed as to firmly grip a towel or like article against slipping and made of one piece.

These, together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent, reside in the a.-

details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure 1 is a front elevational view showing the towel adjuster in use supporting a towel with respect to a persons body, the person being shown in dotted lines;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken through the towel adjuster in its contracted state and shows the relationship of the various portions thereof;

Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of the towel adjuster in its extended state, portions of the towel adjuster being broken away and shown in sec tion for purposes of clarity;

Figure 4 is an enlarged transverse vertical sectional ice view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 4-4 of Figure 2 and shows the details of the connection between the coil spring and the housing; and

Figure 5 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view showing the details of the structure of the clip and the connection between the clip and the spring.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it will be seen that the towel adjuster, which is the subject of this invention, is referred to in general by the reference numeral 10. The towel adjuster includes an elongated housing 12 which is formed of a rubber-like product or any suitable material. The housing 12 is tubular and is generally arcuate in plane.

Passing through the housing 12 is an elongated extensible flexible member in the form of a coil spring lid. The coil spring 14 is of a length to project slightly from opposite ends of the housing 12 when in its contractive state. The center of the coil spring 14 is anchored relative to the center of the housing 12 by a suitable fastener 16 fastened therethrough, as is best illustrated in Figure 4, preventing all of the spring coming out at one end of the housing.

Carried by opposite ends of the coil spring 14 are identical. clips which are referred to in general by the reference numeral 18. Each of the clips 18 includes a pair of cross legs 20 which are connected together by a generally V-shaped bight portion 22. The free ends of the legs 20 are in the form of face-to-face frames which for purposes of simplicity are circular as is best illustrated in Figure 1. Projecting into the center of the frames 24 and terminating in oppositely directed pins 26 are the terminal portions of the legs 20.

By pressing the legs 20 toward each other, due to their crossed relation, the legs will move the frames 24 apart to permit the ready insertion of a towel or the like. When the legs 20 are released, the spring tension of the bight portion 22 will urge the frame toward each other to clamp the towel therebetween. Further, the pins 26 will pierce the towel to hold it in place.

As is best illustrated in Figure 5, the coil spring 14 terminates at each end in a loop 28. The loop 28 has received therein the looped apex 29 of the V-shaped bight portion 22 so as to provide the desired connection between each clip 13 and an associated end of the coil spring 14.

In order to prevent the pinching of ones skin between the individual convolutions of the coil spring 14, there is provided a pair of sheath sections 30. The sheath sections 30, like the housing 12, are formed of rubber-like products. The sheath sections 30 have a combined length which is in excess of the length of the housing 12 so that ends of the sheath sections 30 project from the ends of the housing 12 and partly overlie the bight portions 22. The fastener 16 forms a stop for the inner end of the sheath sections 30.

When the towel adjuster 10 is utilized, the housing 12 is placed about the back portions of a patients neck and the clips 18 are engaged at upper corners of the towel 32, the pins 26 firmly connecting the towel 32 to the clips 18 due to their piercing action. In attaching the clips 18 to the towel 32, the coil spring 14 is stretched more than necessary. Then when the towel 32 is released, the coil spring 14 will contract and pull the towel 32 up into the desired position.

Inasmuch as the housing 12 and the sheath sections 35} are formed of a rubber like product, it will be readily apparent that they will conform to the outline of a pa tients neck. Also, it will have a tendency to frictionally engage the back portion of a patients neck so as to hold the towel adjuster 10 in a fixed position with respect to a patients neck, as is best illustrated in Figure 1, with no discomfort.

While the invention has been illustrated and described relative to a towel, it is not intended to be so limited. The invention may serve equally well as a bib holder and the like and will eliminate the necessity of tying the usual cord or ribbon.

Since numerous modifications and'changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A towel adjuster comprising an elongated housing, an extensible flexible member carried by saidhousing and normally retained substantially in said housing, said flexible member having two ends only projecting from said housing with one of said ends being disposed adjacent each end of said housing, towel engaging clips carried by said flexible member at said 'two'ends, and means anchoring said flexible member to a central part of said housmg.

2. A towel adjuster comprising an elongated housing, extensible flexible member carried by said housingand normally retained substantially in said housing, said flexible member having two ends only projecting from said housing with one of said ends being disposed adjacent each end of said housing, towel engaging clips carried by said flexible member at said two ends, and means anchoring said flexible member to a central part of said housing, said housing being semi-rigid and normally arcuate in outline and intended to engage the back of a persons neck.

3. A towel adjuster comprising an elongated housing, an extensible flexible member carried by said housing and normally retained substantially in said housing, towel engaging clips carried by said flexible member at opposite ends thereof, means anchoring said flexible member to a central part of said housing, said flexible member being in the form of a coil spring, and a protective sheath encasing said coil spring.

4. A towel adjuster comprising an elongated housing, an extensible flexible member carried by said housing and normally retained substantially in said housing, towel engaging clips carried by said flexible member at opposite ends thereof, means anchoring said flexible member to a central part of said housing, said flexible member being aea 'aee 4 in the form of a coilspring, and protective sheaths encasing opposite ends of said coil spring, said protective sheaths being telescoped inopposite ends of said housing.

5. A towel adjuster comprising an elongated housing, an extensible flexible member carried by said housing and normally retained substantially in said housing, towel engaging clips carried by said flexible member at opposite ends thereof, means anchoring said flexible member to a central part of said housing, said flexible member being in the form of a coil spring, and a protective sheath encasing said coil spring, said protective sheath being tele scoped in said housing, said protective sheath being formed in sections disposed on opposite sides of said means.

6. A towel adjuster comprising an elongated housing, said housing being relatively stifi and being arcuate in outline so as to engage the back of a persons neck, an extensible flexible member in the formof a spring carried by said housing and normally retained substantially in said housing, means securing central portions of said flexible member to a central portion-of said housing, ends of said flexible member being free relative to said housing and having carried thereby towel engaging clips, a protective sheath telescoped over opposite end portions of said flexible member and encasing the same, said protective sheath being telescoped in said housing for movement relative theretoon opposite sides of said means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 58,687 Smith ..a Oct. 9, 1866 305,029 Tutt Sept. 9, 1884 308,256 Hayward Nov. 18, 1884 382,287 Brandenburg May 1, 1888 478,076 Asten July 5, 1892 745,961 Hoepfinger Dec. 1, 1903 790,996 Avery May 30, 1905 797,037 White Aug. 15, 1905 875,051 Cummings Dec. 31, 1907 1,219,873 Sapo Mar. 20, 1917 1,331,079 Pitkin Feb. 17, 1920 1,551,829 Maxwell Sept. 1, 1925 1,616,133 Lowy Feb. 1, 1927 FOREIGN PATENTS 59,067 Germany of 1891

Patent Citations
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Classifications
U.S. Classification24/9, 267/74, 2/52, 24/300
International ClassificationA41B13/10, A41B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41B13/10
European ClassificationA41B13/10