Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2821900 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1958
Filing dateMay 6, 1954
Priority dateMay 6, 1954
Publication numberUS 2821900 A, US 2821900A, US-A-2821900, US2821900 A, US2821900A
InventorsTheodore Primich
Original AssigneeTheodore Primich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chimney flue housing
US 2821900 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1958 T. PRlMlcH 2,821,900

' CHIMNEY FLUE HOUSING Fild May 6, 1954 s sheets-sheet 1 Feb. 4, 1958 T. PRlMlcH 2,821,900

CHIMNEY FLUE HOUSING Filed May 6, 1954 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Feb. 4, 1958 T. FRlMlcl-l` 2,821,900

CHIMNEY FLUE HOUSING Filed May e, 1954 l s sheets-sheet s United States Patent 2,821,900 Patented Feb. 4, 1958 CHIMNEY FLUE HOUSING Theodore Primich, Gary, Ind.

Application May 6, 1954, Serial No. 427,901

3 Claims. (Cl. 98-46) The present invention relates to prefabricated chimneys, and more particularly to a chimney ue housing for prefabricated chimneys.

In modern building construction it is becoming customary to utilize prefabricated chimneys instead of the usual brick and mortar chimney, which was standard commonplace practice in the past. Thus far only a few prefabricated chimneys are on the market, since it is necessary that such chimneys meet rather rigid specifications of the F. H. A. and the Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. Such Prefabricated chimneys usually have a support base, upon which sections of the chimney rest. A suitable opening is cut in the roof so that the upper sections of the chimney may project therethrough. It is customary to make the opening in the roof somewhat larger than the outer diameter of the chimney ue section. It, therefore, becomes necessary to employ some housing to cover the opening in `the roof `and to provide a nished appearance to the chimney. In one of the prefabricated chimneys now on the market the chimney ue housing is primarily supported by the chimney ilue. Such arrangement has the disadvantage that the housing, therefore, does not necessarily assume a true vertical position.

Since the prefabricated chimneys have been used, it, of course, has become a problem to construct the housing so that it could be accommodated to roofs Iof diiferent pitch. In one instance the chimney ilue housing comprises substantially a box of quadrangul-ar'cross section having open ends, which then must be cut at an angle in accordance with the roof pitch. Such box loccupies considerable shipping space, and hence involves appreciable transport-ation costs. In other types of construction it has become customary to order a chimney housing custom made for the proper conformation relative to the roof pitch from the nearest local sheet metal worker or furnace supply house. Here again the matter of bulk is a distinct disadvantage, and it further has been found that not infrequently the pitch of the roof has been incorrectly given. Obviously, of course, this requires an appreciable alteration of the housing.

Still another type of chimney ue housing in use today employs a re resistant metal having an asbestos base and comprising a plurality of sheets which must be cut and bolted into position by a suitable framework. Such device involves appreciable labor in the assembly and is also susceptible to improper installation due to failure to properly measure the roof pitch.

lt, therefore, appears desirable to provide an improved type of chimney ue housing which will obviate certain of the disadvantages encountered by housings thus far available. In accordance with the present invention it is contemplated to provide a pack-aged unit in knockeddown form, which can readily be assembled `to provide a rigid, noise free, self-supporting flue housing, and which will not involve appreciable labor or undue skill, nor the use of special installation tools.

It, therefore, is an object of the present invention to provide an improved chimney flue housing which is relatively simple and economical to manufacture and assemble.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved chimney flue housing in unassembled form which is easy to install without the use of tools, requiring at most a hammer and a pair of tin snips.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved chimney flue housing which may be moved and assembled without involving the use of soldering or calking.

A further object of the invention is to provide, in connection with Aan improved chimney flue housing, an improved sheet metal flashing having an integrally formed deep drawn weather portion.

Still another object is to provide an improved unassembled chimney flue housing which can be contained within a relatively compact flat package thereby to reduce shipping space and transportation costs.

Still another object is to provide an improved chimney flue housing which eliminates the need for calculating the angle corresponding to the roof pitch for custom construction and assembly.

A still further object of the invention is to provide in `a chimney ue housing improved corner joints and drive clip fasteners for retaining the parts in rigid assembly.

Other and further objects of the invention subsequently will become apparent by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a sectional View of a prefabricated chimney construction, to which the present invention is applied;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the principal portions of the chimney flue housing comprising the present invention;

Figure 3 is a top view of one end member of the chimney flue housing of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a side view of the end member shown in Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a top View of one side member of the chimney ue housing of Figure 2;

Figure 6 is a side view of the member shown in Figure 5;

Figure 7 is an edge view of the ashing member shown in Figure 2;

Figure 8 is a plan View of the flashing member shown in Figure 7;

Figure 9 is a cross sectional view of the corner construction as seen in the direction of the arrows along the line 9 9 of Figure 2;

Figure l0 is a cross sectional view of the edge construction as seen in the direction of the arrows 10-10 of Figure 2;

Figure 11 is a perspective view of a variation of the assembly of the chimney flue housing of the present invention; and

Figure 12 is a perspective detailed View of the completed installation of the arrangement shown in Figure 11.

in Figure 1 there is shown a prefabricated chimney corresponding to one of the types which at present is approved by F. H. A. and the Reexamination Service of Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. A sufficient portion of the house construction is shown to illustrate the use of a chimney in a single story house, and hence a cross section of the wood beams 15 represents the ceiling of the house, and the cross sections of the other wood beams 16 represents the construction of the roof. A chimney support is positioned between two of the ceiling beams 15 and held in position by a plurality of straps 17. The support consists of an aperture plate, through which extends a ue member or pipe 18. The ilue in the present example is made up of a number of pipe sections of relatively heavy 3 gauge steel which is coated with vitreous enamel. The first or lowcrxnost section 18 of the ue extends a short distance below the chimney support 19. Surrounding the flue sections 18 are cylinders of insulation 21, which in turn are surrounded by sheet metal pipes 22. Suitable sections of flue pipe, insulating material and ,outer sheet metal pipe -are employed to bring the upper end of the chimney a sufficient distance above the roof dependent upon the location of the chimney with respect to the pitch of the roof, and depending upon the building code requirements. A suitable opening 23, generally rectangular in configuration, is provided in the roof structure 16. The opening 23 provides a safety clearance with respect to the outer metal easing 22, which generally is of such size as to have a slight clearance with respect Vto the insulation 21. A suitable chimney flue housing 7.4 encloses the upper extremity of the chimney Hue and protects the opening 23 against theelements. The chimney flue housing 24 is provi-ded at its top with a cover and rain cap 25 which is provided with .a slip joint llue member 26 which extends into the uppermost ue pipe section 18.

In accordance with the present invention the chimney ue housing 24 has certain parts and features best illustrated in Figure 2. In Figure 2 a portion of the housing 24 has been broken away to show the tiue pipe 18 and the protective metal pipes 22 extending through the roof. Actually such pipe extends an appreciable distance be yond that shown in Figure 2 a short distance above the level of the roof 16. Resting immediately upon the roof are two flashing members 27 and 28 which are similar and complementary to each other. The features of the flashing members 27 and 28 subsequently will be described in connection with Figures 7 and 8. The housing 24 rests upon the flashing 27 and 28, and comprises four generally rectangular sheet metal members, two of which have been modified to accommodate the roof pitch. The housing, therefore, comprises two rectangular end members 29 and 31, each of which has at its lower end an angularly bent portion 32 and 33 respectively, which is adjusted to rest parallel on the ashing members 27 and 28 respectively. Two similar side members 34 and 35 are provided. The side members and the end members are retained in cooperative relation by a drive corner fastener 36 subsequently to be described in connection with Figure 9. In the insulation shown in Figure 2 it will be assumed that the lower edge of each of the side members 34 and 3S is cut to conform to the pitch of the roof. The lower edge, therefore, engages the edge supporting member 37 the details of which subsequently will be described in connection with Figures 9 and l0.

The end member 29 is shown in Figures 3 and -4 and comprises a generally rectangular sheet metal member having at its lower edge the extension portion 32. The member 29 at its upper end is hemmed by a folded over portion 38 to improve the rigidity of the upper edge. Each of the vertical edges of the member 29 -is folded over outwardly to provide the edge portions 39 which are spaced from the vremainder of the surface of the member 29 a distance slightly greater than the thickness of the material from which the member 29 is formed. The member 31 is similar to the member 29 shown in Figures 3 and 4 with the exception that the upper edge of the member 31 is not hemmed. The reason for not hemming the member 31 is that it is necessary to shorten the original length of the member 31 as it is received in the package to accommodate the construction to the pitch of the roof. Since the members 32 and 33 are already bent and may be adjusted in angular position to conform to the roof, it, of course, is more convenient to eut olf the upper end of the member 31 than to cut off the lower end and form a new flashing portion 33.

The side member is shown in Figures 5 and 6. The top edge is bent over to provide the hemmed portion 41. The side edges 42 are bent over in a manner similar to the bent over edges 39 of the end piece shown in Figure 3. In order to provide a convenient means of tailoring the piece 35 to a particular roof pitch, there is provided a series of guide lines 43 on the outer surface of the member 35 extending from the lower left hand corner. The guide lines 43 are provided for trimming the lower edge, either by cutting or bending. In the arrangement shown in Figure 2 the side member 35 was trimmed by cutting off that portion of the material between the appropriate line 43 which conformed to the pitch of the roof on which the chimney flue housing was positioned. The member 34 is similar to the member 33, except that the guide lines 43 would appear as substantially a mirror image of that shown in Figure 6 since that would emanate from the lower right hand corner.

Figures 7 and 8 show the ashing member 28 which along one edge has a U-shaped notch 44 delineated by an integrally drawn collar portion 45. The cooperating flashing 27 is of similar configuration to the one shown in Figures 7 and 8, except that the inside dimension of the notch 44 is slightly less to permit the overlapping relation to be employed as shown in the perspective view of Figure 2. Thus far no similar flashing members have been available in the devices now on the market since generally the collar 45 in the flashing has been a separate member which usually has been attached by a folded seam. This' generally has necessitated soldering the seam in order to preclude the entrance of moisture. ln vthe present construction there is no possibility of any seepage of rain or moisture because of the integral one sheet construction. Figure 9 illustrates the drive corner fasteners 36 which hold together the several sheets to form a housing of generally quadrangular cross section. The sheet 31 has a reversely outwardly bent edge 39 with sufficient clearance to receive a portion of the drive corner 36. EFor clarity and illustration, -the clearance provided has vbeen slightly exaggerated in the showing of Figure 9. The distance between the folded over edge portion 39 and the body of the sheet 31 is a little more than the thickness of the material from which the drive corner 36 is made. T he drive corner 36 is an elongated piece of material which is bent at right angles at 51 having its edge portions reversely bent or folded over to provide vthe interlocking portions 52 and 53 which fit in between the folded portions 39 and 42 of the members 31 and 35, respectively. In assembly it may be assumed that the side members 34 and 35 have been cut to proper configuration for use in the manner illustrated in Figure 2. Thereupon two members, such as the folded member 29 and the side member 35, are turned .upside down and the drive corner 36 is then applied and driven into position with a hammer. Thereafter another side portion, such as the member 34, is turned upside down and another drive corner fastens that member to the front section 29. Then the rear section 31 is placed in position and drive corners are applied to interconnect that member with the sheet 34 and the side sheet 35, thus completing a rigid structure. The excess length of the drive corners 36 to the rear of the structure then may be eut off.

Figures 9 and l0 rillustrate the construction of the edge supporting and guiding member 37 shown in Figure 2. The member 37 has a base portion 55 and an upright wall portion 56 which is connected to a folded over portion 57 extending down to the base 55. The folded over portion 57 is connected to another reversely bent folded portion 58 which may be terminated in a folded over or bent edge portion 59 so that the sharp lower edge of the member 35 is readily fitted therein and retained by the inherent resiliency of thev construction shown in Figure 10.

The base 55 is suitably secured in position by nails 61. The member 37 in the construction shown in Figure 2 serves to stabilize the lower edge of the side members 35 so that in a high wind there will be no appreciable give of the member 35, which otherwise might result in undesirable noise. l

It previously was stated that the guide lines 43 provided on the members 34 and 35 were for the purpose of trimming byrcutting or bending the side members to accommodate the structure to a particular roof pitch. The arrangement shown in Figure l1 illustrates how the person who is installing the device might bend the lower portion of the members 34 and 35. Preferably such bending is done with a brake, and, since some sheet metal workers do carry some brakes on their service truck, this can be accomplished on the job. Where such Y bending is accomplished, a triangular piece 63 will be formed as shown in Figure 11, which then serves to stiifen and stabilize the lower edge of the members and 34. Thus in such instance there is no need for the supporting guide members 37. Quite obviously the triangular portion 63 will be fastened to the flashing members 2E and 2?. Suitable fastening means, such as self-tapping screws or nails, are provided to retain in position the flashing members 27, 28, 32 and 33 and the extension members 63. Thereupon the roof is shingled and the ultimate finished product will have the appearance shown in Figure 12. It will be noted that it is customary not to place shingles over the one ashing member 32, and to leave exposed triangular portions of the flashing 27 on either end of the flashing 32.

When the constructions have been completed as shown in either Figures 2 or l1 and 12, the insulation is completed by adding the rain and weather cap 25. This is usually secured to the housing Z4 by self-tapping screws. The resultant structure is one which then may be painted to harmonize with the house or the shingles. The entire assembly may be completed with the simplest of tools, such as a hammer, snips or screw driver. Where the construction is such as shown in Figure 2, there is no need even for a portable brake. The guide lines provided for the roof pitch clearly facilitate a custom installation on the job. The compactness with which the unit 24 may be stored and shipped appreciably reduces shipping space and transportation costs.

While for the purpose of illustrating and describing the present invention certain preferred constructions have been shown in the drawings, it is to be understood that the invention is susceptible of other variations as may be commensurate with the spirit and scope of the invention set forth in the accompanying claims.

I claim as my invention:

l. A chimney flue housing adapted to be assembled and iitted on a pitch roof comprising two rectangular sheet metal end members each having at the bottom end an angularly bent portion adapted to conform to the roof pitch, longitudinal edges of each member being folded over outwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness, a pair of rectangular sheet metal side members each having at the bottom end extending from one corner angularly arranged roof pitch guide lines for trimming the side member to conform to the roof pitch, the longitudinal edges of each member being folded over outwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness, and a drive corner fastener for each corner to hold adjacent sheet members together, said fastener comprising an elongated sheet metal member bent at right angles at its longitudinal center and having its edges folded inwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness to interlock with the folded edges of adjacent sheet metal members.

2. A chimney ue housing adapted to be assembled and tted on a pitch roof comprising two rectangular sheet metal end members each having at the bottom end an angularly bent portion adapted to conform to the roof pitch, longitudinal edges of each member being folded over outwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness, a pair of rectangular sheet metal side members each having at the bottom end extending from one corner angularly arranged roof pitch guide lines for trimming the side member to conform to the roof pitch, the longitudinal edges of each member being folded over outwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness, and a drive corner fastener for each corner to hold adjacent sheet members together, said fastener comprising an elongated sheet metal member bent at right angles at its longitudinal center and having its edges folded inwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness to interlock with the folded edges of adjacent sheet metal members, and two similar flashing members each formed of a rectangular sheet of metal and having along one longitudinal edge a U-shaped notch having its edges bent upwardly, said flashing members being adapted to overlap each other and lie between the roof and the remainder of said housing.

3. A chimney flue housing adapted to be assembled and fitted on a pitch roof comprising two rectangular sheet metal end members each having at the bottom end an angularly bent portion adapted to conform to the roof pitch, longitudinal edges of each member being folded over` outwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness, a pair of rectangular sheet metal side members each having at the bottom end extending from one corner angularly arranged roof pitch guide lines for trimming the side member to conform4 to the roof pitch, the longitudinal edges of each member being folded over outwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness, a drive corner fastener for each corner to hold adjacent sheet members together, said fastener comprising an elongated sheet metal member bent at right angles at its longitudinal center and having its edges folded inwardly in spaced relation somewhat in excess of the metal thickness to interlock with the folded edges of adjacent sheet metal members, and a pair of edge gripping members for the lower edge of each side member comprising an elongated sheet metal member having a base portion and a vertical portion, said vertical portion being folded over downwardly to the base in spaced relation to itself and folded over upwardly in spaced relation to receive between said latter folded portion the lower edge of the side member.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 431,697 Kummel July 8, 1890 696,139 Granton Mar. 25, 1902 791,068 Baker May 30, 1905 836,933 Lauth Nov. 27, 1906 1,072,199 Wood Sept. 2, 1913 1,137,778 Moore May 4, 1915 1,250,551 Brooks Dec. 18, 1917 2,039,886 Cohn May 5, 1936 2,126,499 Petersen Aug. 9, 1938 2,381,548 McLaughlin Aug. 7, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US431697 *Dec 23, 1889Jul 8, 1890 Splice joint foe pipes
US696139 *Nov 11, 1901Mar 25, 1902Clifton A GrantonRoof-joint.
US791068 *Aug 10, 1904May 30, 1905Louis C BakerMolded roof collar and flashing.
US836933 *May 4, 1906Nov 27, 1906John C LauthRoof-flange.
US1072199 *Feb 25, 1913Sep 2, 1913James Homer WoodChimney-protector.
US1137778 *Jul 20, 1914May 4, 1915Francis J MooreVent-pipe.
US1250551 *Dec 26, 1916Dec 18, 1917Harold BrooksSheet-metal wall for buildings.
US2039886 *Sep 7, 1935May 5, 1936 Title not available
US2126499 *Mar 9, 1936Aug 9, 1938James J IngelsMetal joint for sheets or pipe
US2381548 *Apr 29, 1942Aug 7, 1945American Houses IncChimney construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2956495 *Feb 28, 1957Oct 18, 1960Sublette William LPortable chimney
US3281997 *Dec 10, 1962Nov 1, 1966Leonard John RChimney-simulative roof embellishments
US3330233 *Aug 3, 1965Jul 11, 1967 Clements chimneys
US3363369 *Oct 23, 1965Jan 16, 1968Earl E. MillerAll pitch chimney flashing
US3574983 *Feb 10, 1969Apr 13, 1971Kreider Peter ACool wall modular chimney
US3631789 *Sep 28, 1970Jan 4, 1972Kinsey Lewis RMetal chimney with ceramic lining
US4553528 *Jan 4, 1982Nov 19, 1985Wells William TFree-standing stove and fireplace apparatus
US5876276 *Sep 12, 1997Mar 2, 1999Arbucci; Christopher B.Collapsible chimney cap
US5897434 *Oct 24, 1997Apr 27, 1999Arbucci; Christopher B.Chimney cap hood
US6022269 *Apr 27, 1999Feb 8, 2000Christopher ArbucciStackable chimney cap
US7770335 *Jun 17, 2005Aug 10, 2010Evensen Lawrence PRotational roof jack
US20060283100 *Jun 17, 2005Dec 21, 2006Evensen Lawrence PRotational roof jack
EP2317028A2 *Oct 29, 2010May 4, 2011PoujoulatRoof outlet for a flue gas pipe
EP2317028A3 *Oct 29, 2010Jan 11, 2012PoujoulatRoof outlet for a flue gas pipe
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/3, 454/366, 285/44, 138/158
International ClassificationE04D13/147, E04F17/00, E04F17/02, E04D13/14
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/1476, E04D13/1475, E04F17/026
European ClassificationE04D13/147D2, E04D13/147D1, E04F17/02D