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Publication numberUS2822808 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1958
Filing dateNov 20, 1956
Priority dateNov 20, 1956
Publication numberUS 2822808 A, US 2822808A, US-A-2822808, US2822808 A, US2822808A
InventorsBoone George D
Original AssigneeBoone George D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable specimen collector
US 2822808 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb, 11, 1958 G. D. BOONE DISPOSABLE SPECIMEN COLLECTOR Z 0 4 6 8 3 3 4 n S .m .w 2 m m 4 .w a 2 m 6 8 "w 6 0 Wm 3 F wfitgx E M\ A A w WW M, I!!! s Filed NOV. 20, 1956 IN V EN TOR.

$3 n I I I I I I I I I I I I I I/I EHIIIQ'QIIII! George 0. Boa/7e United States Patent 2,822,808 DISPOSABLE SPECIMEN COLLECTOR George D. Boone, Tucson, Ariz. Application November 20, 1956, Serial No. 623,381

I 8 Claims. or. 128-276) The present inventiontrelates to a precision-made specimen collector constructed of transparent disposable plas-. tics and elficaciouslyusable in trapping and recovering specimens of normal or abnormal material aspirated from human and animal body passages and cavities and which is such in construction that it lends itself .to practical and expedient use for medical and non-medical pur-. poses.

Briefly the invention, in a preferred embodiment thereof, is characterized by two simple components or units; namely, a main or primary unit and a companion auxiliary unit. The main unit comprises a straight plastic tube 11.5 cm. in length with a bore of 14 mm. The proximal or upper end terminates in a tubular prolonga tion 3 cm. in length with a bore of 4 mm. Incorporated in this tubular prolongation is an O-ring which permits of an air-tight engagement of the inserted proximalend of the auxiliary unit. The distal end of the main unit terminates in a tubular prolongation 2 cm. in length with a bore of 6 mm. Incorporated in this tubular prolongation are two O-rings, so spaced that the perforation in the auxiliary unit is effectually occluded when the latter unit is properly inserted into the main unit. The auxiliary unit is a straight plastic tube 12 cm. in length with a bore of 3 mm. The proximal end of this unit engages in an airtight fit when inserted into the proximal end of the main unit. The distal end of this unit is connected by tubingto a suction apparatus and 3.5 cm. from the distal end of this unit there is an orifice or vent 1 mm. in diameter which is finger-controlled.

In the closed position the auxiliary unit traverses the chamber of the main unit so that airflow in the suction circuit or line is only through the auxiliary unit. In: the open or operating position the auxiliary unit is slid down and into the collection chamber so that its proximal end is approximately 2 cm. distal to the proximal end of the main unit. In this position airflow in the suction circuit is into the major unit and then through the auxiliary unit to the suction apparatus. When the two units thus cooperating particulate matter in the airflow is precipitated into'the chamber, the orifice being, of course, accessible for intermittent occlusion by the users finger tip. 7

The herein revealed specimen collector features the following objectives and advantages not available in specimen collectors now in use, to wit:

(1) It is simple, easy to use and is economically disposable. This achievement avoids danger of hand injuries inherent in the cleansing of the glass collectors of the Lukins type now in use. Its unique construction saves the time required to cleanse, package, and sterilize non-disposable collectors.

(2) Itpermitstrapping of aspirated materiallwithout danger of loss of material by malpositioning of the collector. V p V (3)" It permits of intermittent trapping of aspirated 2,822,8fl8 C Patented Feb. 11, 1958 material without removal of the collector from the suction circuit.

(4) It permits of intermittent flushing of the suction circuit with water without removal of the collector from the circuit.

(5) And, what is highly important, it permits of cen trifugation of collected aspirated material without resorting to bothersome transfer of the collected material to a centrifugetube.

Features and advantages not specifically comprehended above will become readily apparent from the drawings, specification and the invention as hereinafter claimed.

In the accompanying sheet of drawings, wherein like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the views:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a so-called exploded type showing the ,two components or units disassembled.

Fig. 2 is a view in longitudinal section, with portions in elevation, showing the unit assembled and disclosing the slidable auxiliary unit in the open position, a phase of the concept which will be subsequently elaborated upon.

Fig. 3 is a similarview with the auxiliary unit in closed position. V

Fig. 4 is a cross-section on the plane of the line 4-4 of Fig. 3, looking in thedirection of the arrows.

By way of introduction to the specification I would mention that laminar airflow through a small straight smooth tube is converted to turbulent oreddy airflow when there are irregularities or sudden change in calibre of the tube. With eddy airflow precipitation of particu late matter in the airflow occurs. This physical characteristic of airflow is utilized in the design of a disposable plastic specimen collector which permits of in termittent trapping of aspirated material without interruption of the airflow suction syste Referring now to the views of the drawing it will be noticed that the two units are constructed of a suitable grade of commercial transparent plastics. That is to say, the collector may be made of polyethylene, plastics, synthetic rubber, phenolic compounds, or combinations of these. Other materials may be found to be adaptable for use. Colorants may be added. The tensile load is suflicient to withstand all possible suction pressure exerted by standard apparatus. The collector is packaged sterile, ready for use.

As previously mentioned the main unit 6 comprises a straight plastic tube 8, the upper end portion 10 of which is preferably in general conical form as at 12 and terminates in a tubular prolongation or nipple 14 to which the cooperating end of the suction apparatus hose 16 is connected as seen in Figs. 2 and 3. This is herein called the proximal end and it will be noticed that the bore 14 thereof is in axial alignment in communication with the trapping chamber 16 in the body portion 8. As perhaps best seen in Fig. 2 the upper end of the chamber is tapered at 18 and merges into a slightly reduced bore 20 which constitutes a socket. At the juncture of the socket and bore 14 a further reduction in cross-section provides a shoulder 22. Intermediate its ends the socket is grooved to accommodate an O-ring 24. The lower of distal end of the body is fashioned into a second tubular prolongation 26 and the bore 28 thereof is axially aligned with th? chamber 16 and is provided with longitudinally spaced grooves accommodating spaced O-rings 30. These rings are spaced apart to achieve the results seen in Fig. 3. It will be further noticed that exteriorly the proximal end portion 12 is provided with endless ,outstanding ribs or flanges 32 and 34 defining an intervening groove 36. This flanged construction functions to 3 permit engagement of the ready-to-test or assembled collector (Fig. 3) in a centrifuge cup (not shown).

The companion and complemental auxiliary or minor unit 38 comprises a clear plastic linearly straight tube 40 whose upper or proximal end is denoted at 42 and whose lower or distal end is denoted at 44. 'A venting orifice 46 is formed in the side of the tube between the median portion and distal end 44.

Reverting to Fig. 1, this depicts the collector or rather the components or units 6 and 38 thereof in a disassembled state. On the other hand, as seen in Figs. 2 and 3 with the tube or unit 38 inserted in the bore 28 of the reduced distal portion or prolongation 26 an airtight fit is assured, this by way of the O-rings 24 and 30, respectively; It is repeated that the flanged construction embodying flanges 32'and 34 and groove 36 permit engagement of the collector in a more or less standard centrifuge cup.

Fig. 3 depicts the collecto'r'assembled for insertion into a suction circuit. The tube.40 spans and'traverses the chamber 16 and has airtight mounting in the manner shown. That is to say, the proximal end portion 42 fits up into the socket 20 and engages the stop shoulder 22. Theo-ring 24 provides the airtight fit- Also, the distal end portion is now located in the bore 28 and an airtight fit is maintained by the O-ring 30 with the orifice 46 located between the O-rings 3,0. In this adaptation there is no interruption of the suction airflow and all aspirated material is therefore carried to the suction apparatus (not shown). V 7

Fig.2 depicts the collector with the unit 38 partially withdrawn distally from the unit 6. In this position there is interruption of the airflow so that laminar airflow becomes eddy airflow and aspirated material is precipitated into the major unit. Intermittent aspiration is done by intermittent closure of the orifice 46 with the finger tip. When adequate aspirated material has been collected, it is trapped by repositioning of the proximal end 42 of the unit 38 into the socket 20 at the proximal end of the unit 6.

As previously mentioned, the collector may be used wherever it is desired to recover, by trapping, a speciment or specimens of normal or abnormal material aspirated from human or animal body passages or cavities, or in any non-medical procedure where the same is applicable structurally and functionally.

As a specific example, the use of the collector in bronchoscopy follows: In this procedure it is desired to recover material aspirated from the tracheobronchial tree for laboratory examination. After the operator introduces the bronchoscope, he passes a small-bore metal aspirating tube (not shown) through the bronchoscope into the tracheobronchial tree. This metal tube is connected by a short length of rubber or plastic tubing to the proximal end of the primary or main unit of the disposable plastic collector. The distal end of the smaller auxiliary unit or tube is in turn connected by a longer length of rubber or plastic tubing to the suction apparatus. With the assembled collector in the closed position (Fig. 3) aspirated material traverses the collector to the trap bottle of the suction apparatus (not shown). When it is desired to trap aspirated material for laboratory examination, the auxiliary unit is partially withdrawn from the main unit for a distance of approximately 2 cm. (Fig. 2). By applying the finger tip intermittently to the perforation in the minor un'itfaspirated material is precipitated in the chamberof said'maidun'it. When an adequate amount of material'is collected the proximal body. 7

is carried to the laboratory where it is placed in the centrifuge (not shown) without necessity of changing the collected material to a standard centrifuge tube.

It will be evident that the description of the invention taken in conjunction with the illustrative, but not restrictive, drawings and claims that the invention aptly fulfills the purposes for which it is intended.

Minor changes in shape, materials, rearrangement of components and parts, may be resorted to in actual practice, without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the sub-joined claims.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. For use in trapping and recovering specimens of normal or abnormal material aspirated from human and animal body passages and cavities, a specimen collector which functions to intermittently trap and collect aspirated material without interruption of the usual and required suction airflow through said collector and which comprises a main unit embodying atubular body providing the desired specimen trapping and collecting chamber and which permits centrifugation of the collected specimen without having to transfer the specimen from said chamber to a centrifuge tube,'said body being equipped with proximal and. distal end portions having reduced axially aligned cooperating bores, anda complemental auxiliary unitin the form'of a removable open ended tube having constantly open proximal and distal end portions, said auxiliary tube spanning and-traversing said chamber and having its respective end portions removably mounted in airtight engagement in the respective bores of the proximal and distal end portions of said body, whereby, with the auxiliary tube thus mounted, there will be no interruption of the suction air flow and all of the aspirated material will be delivered to a suction apparatus which is communicatively attached to the proximal end portion of said 2. The s ructure defined inclaim 1 and wherein said auxiliary tube is linearly straight from end to end and is of a length greater'than the length of said chamber and said reduced distalend portion, the distal end portion of said auxiliary tube extending through and beyond the bore of the reduced distal end portion of saidbody and having a finger-tip covered and intermittently controlled orifice in one side.

3. The structure defined in claim 2 and wherein the wall of the bore in said reduced distal end portion is provided with longitudinally spaced packing rings, said orifice being situated and confined at this stage of operation in the bore ata place between said packing rings.

4. For use win trappingand recovering specimens of normal or abnormal materialaspirated from human and animal body. passages. andcavities, a specimen collector which functions to intermittently trapand collect aspiratedmaterial without interruption of the usual and required suction airflow through said collector and which comprises a main .unit embodying a tubular body .providing .the desired. specimen trapping and collecting chamber and which permits centrifugation of the col-. lected specimenwithout having to transfer the specimen from said chamber to a centrifuge tube, said body being equipped with proximal and distal end portions having reduced axially aligned cooperating bores, and a complemental auxiliary unitin the form of a removableopen end of the auxiliary unit-is thenreinserted to the closed position, securely trapping the collected specimen. Continued aspiration of secretions or of flush water to clear the suction circuit may be accomplished without disturb ing the trapped material. Byrepositioning the auxiliary unit intermittenttrapping of material is permissible. when the procedureis completedtheclosed collector (Fig. 3)

ended tube having constantly open proximal and. distal end portions, said auxiliary tube spanning and traversing said chamber-and havingits respectiveend portions removablymountedin airtight engagement in therespec tive bores of; the proximal and distal'end portions of said body, whereby, withthe auxiliary tube thus mounted, there wilhbe po interruption of the suction airflow and all of the aspirated material will-be delivered to a suction apparatus which is cornmunicatiyely attached to the proximal end portion of; said body, a the proximal end portion of said auxiliary tube having the additionalfuncthe??? r tsasd t is s qna Pa ties bs w ifl chamber of the body proper and the adjacent end of the bore of said reduced proximal end portion of said body being formed into a socket having a stop shoulder, and the cooperating terminal portion of the proximal end portion of the auxiliary tube fitting slidingly into said socket and abutting said stop shoulder, and the wall of said socket having a packing ring embracing said terminal portion, the latter constituting a manually regulable valve, whereby when the auxiliary tube is slid and withdrawn from the pocket, a predetermined distance toward the distal end portions and drawn into said chamber, the valve is opened and the desired aspirated material is shunted into the chamber for retention and sub sequent handling.

5. The structure defined in claim 4 and wherein the terminal end of the reduced proximal end portion of said body is fashioned into an axially extending nipple to which a suction hose is removably connectible.

6. The structure defined in claim 4 and wherein the wall of the bore in said reduced distal end portion is provided with longitudinally spaced packing rings, said ori- 6 fice being situated and confined at this stage of operation in the bore at a place between said packing rings.

7. In combination, a specimen collector comprising a large bore tube constituting a main unit, and a small bore tube constituting a companion auxiliary unit, the proximal end of said main unit terminating in a tubular prolongation having a bore and a socket incorporated in the bore and affording communication between the chamber of the main unit and said bore, the distal end of said main unit terminating in a tubular prolongation having a bore in communication with said chamber, said auxiliary unit being slidably mounted in the bore of the distal prolongation and extending into said chamber, bridging the chamber and having its proximal end slidably receivable in said socket, an intermediate portion of said auxiliary tube having a finger control orifice therein.

8. The structure defined in claim 7 and wherein the proximal tubular elongation is provided exteriorly with endless spaced flanges serving to permit engagement of the assembled collector in a centrifuge cup.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3308825 *Aug 2, 1963Mar 14, 1967Joseph R CruseSurgical suction device
US3426759 *Apr 4, 1966Feb 11, 1969Davol IncAbdominal suction drainage tube
US3661144 *Sep 16, 1969May 9, 1972Hans GramSuction apparatus for body cavities
US3794039 *Oct 26, 1970Feb 26, 1974Linde AgApparatus for cryosurgery
US3906955 *May 6, 1974Sep 23, 1975Richard R RobertsSurgical cauterizing tool having suction means
US3952743 *Mar 25, 1974Apr 27, 1976Unisearch LimitedSuction device
US3982546 *Feb 28, 1975Sep 28, 1976Friend John HDevice for draining a body cavity
US4697600 *Jun 4, 1986Oct 6, 1987Frank CardenasMethod for obtaining tissue and cells by fine needle aspiration for cytology/biopsy and kit relating to the same
US4998915 *Feb 1, 1990Mar 12, 1991Unimed, Inc.Aspirating device
US5027827 *Mar 28, 1990Jul 2, 1991Cody Michael PVacuum biopsy apparatus
US5228436 *Aug 12, 1992Jul 20, 1993Marvin BeinProximal fluid trap
US5295830 *Nov 27, 1992Mar 22, 1994James ShenAseptic dental valves and instruments
EP1593401A1 *Apr 12, 2005Nov 9, 2005Fehling AGSurgical suction device
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/119, 600/573, 600/562, 604/319
International ClassificationA61M25/00, A61B10/02, A61B10/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B10/02, A61M25/00
European ClassificationA61M25/00, A61B10/02