Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2822840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1958
Filing dateDec 27, 1954
Priority dateDec 27, 1954
Publication numberUS 2822840 A, US 2822840A, US-A-2822840, US2822840 A, US2822840A
InventorsGilbert I Reynolds, Axel A Tallquist
Original AssigneeEderer Engineering Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for bonding kraft paper to veneer sheet
US 2822840 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 11, 1958 G. l. REYNOLDS ETAL 2 2,822,840

MACHINE FOR BONDING KRAFT 'PAPER To VENEER SHEET Filed Deo. 2'?, 1F54 2 sne'ts-shee: 1

1N V EN TORS G/Zerf I eyn old;

4BY Axc/ A. Mya/5r @au IMQMQ# Feb. 11, 1958 G. l. REYNOLDS 'ETAL `2,822,840

MACHINE FOR BONDING KRAFT PAPER TO VENER SHEET 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 27, 1954 United States Patent MACHINE FOR BONDING KRAFT PAPER TO VENEER SHEET Gilbert I. Reynolds, Port Blakely, and Axel A. Tallquist,

Seattle, Wash., assignors to Ederer Engineering Company, Seattle, Wash., a corporation of Washington Application December 27, 1954, Serial No. 477,816

4 Claims. (Cl. 144-279) This invention relates to a machine and method of producing, from veneer wood and kraft paper, a product hereinafter termed kraft veneer laminate, the said product being one in which the veneer sheet is sandwiched between sheets of the kraft paper so as to combine the stitfening quality of the veneer with the toughness of the paper. v

The general object of the invention is to provide a machine and method by which said operation of bonding paper to veneer may be performed expeditiously and at nominal expense.

This and other more particular objects and advantages will appear and be understood in the coursev of the following description and claims, the invention consisting in the new method and in the novel construction, adaptation and combination of parts hereinafter described and claimed.'

In the accompanying drawings:

VFigure l is a fragmentary side elevational view illustrating a machine constructed toembody the preferred teachings of the present invention, and incorporatinga showing of kraft paper and wood veneer as these com` ponents pass through the machine.

` Fig. V2 is a` fragmentary enlarged-scale longitudinal' vertical sectional view thereof; and

Fig; 3 is a fragmentary transverse vertical sectional view on line 3 3 of Fig. 2.

The steps practiced in producing the kraft veneer laminate will be here cursorily traced in thebelief that such will add to clarity in an understanding of the later detailed description of the machine and method. `Drawn from a respective supply reel an upper and a lower sheet Vof kraft paper are each given continuous travel along vguided travel paths andl in the course of such travel the said upper and lower paper, designated by P-1 and P-2,respectively, are each coated on one facing surface witha suitable cement or glue. For our glue we prefer to utilize a thermosetting adhesive such, for example,-as urea formaldehyde, resorcin formaldehyde, phenolformaldehyd'e, a plasticol, starch or silicate.

Following the application of such glue the said upper and; lower sheets of kraft paper are brought against the top Yand bottom face, respectively, of the veneer. Having moved along a separate path which merges with the paths travelled by the two sheetsV of kraft paper, the veneer-'- which isor may be,` composedof. transversely extending strips of scrap stock-in the meantime traverses a crowder table whereateach successive stripis overtaken by the next following strip so that the leading edge of such following stripsare brought against the .trailing edge of the preceding strip. `After"su`ch multi-strip sheet of veneer andthe twosheets of paper vare-brought together, pressure and'heatis'applied to effectuate'a bonding. I,

.Referring fto the drawings it will be seen that there are providedtwo successive horizontal conveyors of which the yfirst-acting cnveyorY performs n'the crowding function and-of which the other4 conveyor performs the bonding function. `lt is by these terms fcrowding and ,bonding that the4 two conveyo'r's'will be hereinafter referred to. The crowding conveyor'is composed of complementing u'pp'er ndlower members .whichfeach comprise a plurality of laterally spaced endless belts. The upper said ice belts, designated by 10, pass about lve and idler rollers 11 and 12, respectively, while the lower belts 13 pass about live and idler rollers 14 and 15, respectively. Beyond the tail end of such lower belts 13 and horizontally aligned with the upper run thereof is a rigid platformV 16, and as a lapping complement of this platform there are provided a plurality of bars 17. These bars are disposed longitudinally of the crowder conveyor in the interstice between the upper belts 10 and have their tail ends overlapping the platform 16. Upstanding rods 18 rigid with the bars are journaled for vertical slide movement in brackets 20 carried by a frame-work 21, and upon the upper ends of the rods there are provided weights 22. Said idler rollers 12 lie at the tail end of the concerned belt and are mounted upon a common spindle 23 journaled at each end in a respective block 24 vertically adjustable in a cage 25. The arrangement for driving these belts 10 and 13 is such that the upper belts have a speed accelerated by comparison with the speed of the lower belts. The upperbelts 10 terminate short of the lower belts, thus operating to close gaps from between successive strips of veneer as the vslower speed of strips propelled only by the lower belt 13 causes them to be overtaken by strips moving under the inuence of the faster upper belt 10.

.Like the crowder conveyor, the bonding conveyor is here shown as being also comprised of complementary upper and lower endless belts 26 and 27, respectively. These latter belts are, however, wide belts extending substantially the full width of the machine. In its endless travel the upper belt 26 is trained about a live drum 30 and idler rollers 3l, 32, 33 and 34. The lower belt 27 is trained about a live drum 35 and idler rollers 36, 37, 38 and 39. The upper run of the lower belt, passing from roller 39 to drum 35, is sustained upon a at table 40, and it is between this section of the lower belt and a paralleling lower run of the upper belt that the step of bonding kraft paper to veneer is performed, the merging of the three said separate preliminary paths travelled by the veneer sheet V and by the tWo paper sheets P-1 and P-2 occurring at the head end of these complementing-runs.

As to the kraft 'sheet P1, this being the lower sheet, the same is drawn from a reel. 29 journaled for free-turning movement in amounting box 41 and passes first around-an idler roll 42 and thence is fed into touching 1 the bonding conveyor.

contact with a'glue-spreading roll 43 which bears in turn against a dip roller 44 having its lower portion turning in a pot 45 containing glue. For the upper sheet of kraft paper, which is drawn from a reel 46, there is provided thev counterpart of the described gluing system, the pot, dip roller, and spreading roll being in this instance denoted by 47, 48 and 49, respectively.

ln the lower-run travel of the upper belt 26, and namely between the idler head roll 34 and the live drum 30, the

belt passes below a succession of longitudinally spaced apart transversely extending pressure rolls 50. `Trunnion shafts 51 at each end of these rolls are journaled in boxes 52 guided for vertical slide movement by rods 53, and pressing from above upon these boxes toV exert a yielding downward thrust thereon are respective compression springs 54.

In order to cure the thermo-setting glue applied by the spreading rolls 43 and 49 the laminated paper-veneerpaper product is caused to be heated as it movesv with We show, as the source of this heat, a plurality of infra-red tubes 56 such, for example, as the tubes illustrated and described in U. S. Patent #2,535,268. Associated with each of theseV tubes is a reflector, as 57, and the tubes are arranged in two top surface of the upper run of the upper belt 26, and

Patented Peb. 11, s

with the lower bank focusingits heat upon the top surface of the lower run of the lower belt 27. ln view of the heat-storage ability of the two cord-reinforced belts 26 and 27 and the inherent ability of infra-red heat to penetrate an object on which the heat is focused the particular surface of the belts onto which the infra-red heat is directed is immaterial. It should, however', be pointed out that the upper belt 26 can be deleted, retaining only the lower belt 27 as a conveyorin which case the heat from the upper bank of tubes must perforce be played directly on the conveyed product. It is for this reason that the upper bank of tubes are illustrated as having their heat rays directed downwardly.

It is believed that the invention will have been clearly understood from the foregoing-detailed description of our now preferred illustrated embodiment. Weiind; thaty a bonding zone 25 ft. in length used in conjunction with a belt speed approximating 50 ft. per minute, and with the temperature of the belts at the ingress end of the bonding zone in the neighborhood ofV 300 F., provides an ideal condition. The veneer used should be fairly dry, say with a moisture content, byrpreference, not in excess of One use for which the kraft veneer laminate produced by the present machine-is especially suited is thebottom, sides and top of a crate such, for example, asA the crates used in boxing fruit. Strips of the finished laminate are clipped to width so that the bottom, sides and top may be separate or, if desired, the veneer strips are or may be.

clipped to a predetermined necessary width before their lamination with the facing sheets, leaving the latter con-v tinuous through` the full combined width'of sides, bottom and top. It may occur, moreover, that spaces of moderate width are desired between these pre-clipped veneer strips in order to give the strips a freer hinge action after they have been joined bythe facing sheets of paper. In such case the crowding action is deleted and a spacing means substituted therefor.

Minor changes in the invention will suggest themselves and may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of therinvention, wherefore it is our intention that no limitations be implied and that the hereto annexed claims be given a scope fullyV commensurate with the broadest interpretation to which, the employed language admits.

We claim:

l. A machine for producing the described kraft veneer laminate and namely a laminate composed of wood veneer sandwiched between facing, sheets of` kraft paper, said machine comprising a generally horizontal bonding throat defined at the bottom by the upper run of a lower endless conveyor belt and at the top bythe lower run of an upper endless conveyor belt, both of said belts having high thermal capacity, a flat tableunderlying and giving support to said upper run of the lower conveyor belt, a series of transversely extending longitudinally spaced apart pressure rolls bearing from'above upon the lower run of said upper conveyor belt, a respective means for concentrating heat upon each of said conveyor belts so located as to apply its heat to the related belt along a section of the belts travel which is outside the bonding throat and thereby storing heat within said belt in advance of the traversal by said belt of the bonding throat, means for applyinga thermo-setting glue to one surface of each of the facing sheets, and means for bringing said glued surfaces against the opposite faces of the veneer and feeding the laminateV into the admission end of the bonding throat..

2. A machine for producing the described kraft veneer laminate, and namely a laminate composed of'a core of veneerisandwiched between facing sheets' of kraft paper, said machine comprising a generally horizontal bonding throat defined at the bottom bythe upper run of an endless conveyor belt and at the top by a series of transversely extending pressure rolls bearingupon said 'upper run of -meansy for applying a thermo-setting glue to one surface of each of the facing sheets, means for bringing said glued surfaces against opposite faces of the veneer and feeding the laminate into the admission end of the bonding throat, and means for heating the laminate as it moves through the throat so as to set said glue, the belt being a cord-reinforced strucmreofhigh' heat-storing capacity, said heating means performing its'heating function by concentrating heat rays upon the lower runof the conveyor belt, thus storing heatl tol bre-later transferred by conduction to the laminate in the upper-run travel of the belt.

3. A machine for producing the described kraft veneer laminate andnamely alaminatecomposed of wood veneer sandwiched between facing sheets of kraft paper, said machine comprising a generally horizontal bonding throat defined at the bottomby the upper runof a lower endless conveyor belt and at the top bythe lower run of anY upper endless conveyor belt,: both of said belts having. a high thermal capacity, a at table underlying and giving sup.- port to said upper run ofthe lower conveyor belt, a series of transversely extending longitudinally spaced apart pressure rolls bearing from above upon the lower run of said upper conveyor belt, a bank of infra-red heaters positioned so as to project their heat rays upon the upper run ofthe upper conveyor belt. so. as to. store heat within said belt before the belt reaches the bonding throat, a bank of infra-red heaters positioned so as to project their heat rays upon the lower run of the; lower conveyor belt to store heat in the lower belt likewise before the same reaches the bondingthroat, means for applying a thermo-setting glue to one surface of each of the facing sheets, and means for bringing said glued surfaces` against the opposite faces of the veneer Vand feeding the laminate into the admission (i endv of the bonding throat, the advance heating of the belts, insuring'a. curing temperature of highest intensity at the very advent of the laminates admission to the bonding throat and a progressively lowering temperature as the curing laminate, proceeding withV the belts through said bonding throat, draws the stored heat from the belts.

' 4. A machine for producing the described kraft veneer laminate and namely a laminate composed of wood veneer sandwiched between facing sheets of kraft paper, said machine comprising an endless conveyor belt having high thermal capacity, backing means giving support to the belt along one run thereof, means complementing said backed run of the belt to define a bonding throat between said complementingmeans'and the backed run of the belt, pressure means operativelyassociated with said belt, the backing means, and said complementing means so as to yieldingly press the complementing means towards the belt, a. means for concentratingheat upon the belt so located as to apply its heat along a section of the belts travel which is outsidethe bonding throat and thereby storing heat within said belt in advance of the traversal by said belt of the' bonding throatjmeans for applying a thermosettingglue to one surface 'of each of the facing sheets, and means for bringing said glued surfaces against the opposite faces of the veneer and feeding the laminate into the adthe belt at longitudinally spaced intervals thereof, meansV i Y underlying and giving support tosaid upper run of the belt,

mission end of the bonding throat.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 709,864 Boenning Sept. 30, 1902 1,361,970 Dickey Dec. 14, 1920 1,427,971 Porter Sept. 5, 1922 1,450,060 Blossfeldr Mar. 27, 1923 1,999,253 l 'Norris. Apr. 30, 1935 2,459,279Y VHolden Jan. 18,1949 2,459,295 `Skoog Jan. 18, 1949 2,479,290' AuxierV et al. Aug. 16, 1949 2,488,759 yBolling i Nov. 22, 1949 2,490,819 Y jLambertlet al. Dec. 13, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS 586,638 Great Britain Mar. 26, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US709864 *Aug 1, 1901Sep 30, 1902William M BoenningApparatus for edge-uniting veneers.
US1361970 *Feb 15, 1919Dec 14, 1920Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoComposite-plate-curing machine
US1427971 *Feb 2, 1921Sep 5, 1922 Compo-board machine
US1450060 *Jun 22, 1921Mar 27, 1923Emil BlossfeldWood-core-wall-board machine
US1999253 *Jul 24, 1933Apr 30, 1935Reconstruction Finance CorpMethod of gluing
US2459279 *Jun 24, 1947Jan 18, 1949Laminating Specialties IncProcess for plastic coating
US2459295 *May 6, 1944Jan 18, 1949Skoog Per FApparatus for the flow manufacture of sheet material
US2479290 *Oct 29, 1945Aug 16, 1949Westinghouse Electric CorpLaminating machine
US2488759 *Dec 22, 1945Nov 22, 1949Mereen Johnson Machine CompanyPlywood core machine
US2490819 *Jun 2, 1947Dec 13, 1949Tennessee Valley AuthorityMaking laminated lumber
GB586638A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2958363 *May 31, 1955Nov 1, 1960Chicago Mill And Lumber CompanMethod and apparatus for producing assemblies of hinged-together panels
US5287908 *Dec 19, 1991Feb 22, 1994Hunter Douglas Inc.Window covering assembly
US5313999 *May 17, 1991May 24, 1994Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
US5339883 *Oct 20, 1992Aug 23, 1994Hunter Douglas Inc.Covering assembly for architectural openings
US5392832 *Nov 30, 1992Feb 28, 1995Hunter Douglas Inc.Covering assembly for architectural openings
US5394922 *Apr 13, 1992Mar 7, 1995Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
US5454414 *Oct 20, 1992Oct 3, 1995Hunter Douglas Inc.Window blind material and window covering assembly
US5638880 *Nov 9, 1993Jun 17, 1997Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering with rigid vanes
US5714034 *Mar 12, 1993Feb 3, 1998Hunter Douglas Inc.Apparatus for fabricating honeycomb material
US5718799 *Jun 7, 1995Feb 17, 1998Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
US5845690 *Feb 18, 1997Dec 8, 1998Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering with rigid vanes and support cords
US5888639 *May 23, 1997Mar 30, 1999Newell Operating CoCellular panel and method and apparatus for making the same
US6001199 *May 16, 1994Dec 14, 1999Hunter Douglas Inc.Method for manufacturing a fabric light control window covering
US6045890 *Jun 23, 1997Apr 4, 2000Newell Operating CompanyCellular panel and method and apparatus for making the same
US6112797 *Feb 9, 1998Sep 5, 2000Hunter Douglas Inc.Apparatus for fabricating a light control window covering
US6284347Nov 11, 1999Sep 4, 2001Newell Operating CompanyCellular panel and method and apparatus for making the same
US6572725Dec 19, 2001Jun 3, 2003Hunter Douglas Inc.Method for fabricating honeycomb material
US6688369Jul 25, 2001Feb 10, 2004Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
US6908661Jul 23, 2001Jun 21, 2005Newell Operating CompanyCellular panel and method and apparatus for making the same
US7059378Oct 27, 2003Jun 13, 2006Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
US20040045469 *Mar 21, 2003Mar 11, 2004Herhold Karen S.Pearlescent honeycomb material and method for fabricating same
US20040084158 *Oct 27, 2003May 6, 2004Colson Wendell B.Fabric light control window covering
US20040149396 *Jan 7, 2004Aug 5, 2004Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
US20050147800 *Feb 14, 2005Jul 7, 2005Hunter Douglas Inc.Pearlescent honeycomb material and method for fabricating same
US20060180278 *Apr 13, 2006Aug 17, 2006Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
USD456196Sep 21, 2001Apr 30, 2002Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric light control window covering
USD691391May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel
USD691392May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel
USD691393May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel
USD691394May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel
USD691395May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel
USD691396May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel
USD691486May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel for coverings for architectural openings
USD691487May 4, 2011Oct 15, 2013Hunter Douglas Inc.Fabric panel
USD740588May 2, 2014Oct 13, 2015Hunter Douglas Inc.Covering for an architectural opening having a vane with a pattern
USD750395May 2, 2014Mar 1, 2016Hunter Douglas Inc.Covering for an architectural opening having a vane with a pattern
USD751319May 2, 2014Mar 15, 2016Hunter Douglas Inc.Covering for an architectural opening having a sheet with a pattern
EP0565131A1 *Sep 5, 1991Oct 13, 1993Hunter Douglas International NvProcess and apparatus for fabricating honeycomb material
WO1992004182A2 *Sep 5, 1991Mar 19, 1992Hunter Douglas International N.V.Process and apparatus for fabricating honeycomb material
WO1992004182A3 *Sep 5, 1991May 29, 1992Hunter Douglas InternationalProcess and apparatus for fabricating honeycomb material
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/551, 144/345, 156/552
International ClassificationB32B21/06
Cooperative ClassificationB32B21/06
European ClassificationB32B21/06