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Publication numberUS2823392 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1958
Filing dateAug 11, 1955
Priority dateAug 11, 1955
Publication numberUS 2823392 A, US 2823392A, US-A-2823392, US2823392 A, US2823392A
InventorsHoward Barry
Original AssigneeHoward Barry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Removable furniture leg
US 2823392 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 18, 1958 H. BARRY 2,823,392

REMOVABLE FURNITURE LEG Filed Aug. 11, 1955 SSheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR HOWARD BARRY TTORNEY5 Feb. 18, 1958 H. BARRY 2,823,392

REMOVABLE FURNITURE LEG Filed Aug. 11, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR HOWARD v BARR Y ATTORNEYS Feb. 18, 1958 H. BARRY 2,823,392

REMOVABLE FURNITURE LEG Filed Aug. 11, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR HOWARD BARRY .ATTORNEYS United States Paterit' O REMOVABLE FURNITURE LEG Howard Barry, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Application August 11, 1955, Serial No. 527,692

15 Claims. (Cl. 5310) This invention relates to a novel furniture leg structure and more particularly it pertains to a removable furniture leg and to a bed headboard supporting structure adapted to cooperate with the leg structure to support an ordinary headboard.

A great many pieces of furniture are presently sold having a wooden framework at the base thereof which can be readily supported on removable legs. A prime example of this type of furniture is the so-called stu-dio type bed which consists of a box-spring and mattress or a combination box-spring mattress with removable legs attached to the wooden framework of the box-spring. The removable legs used in studio type beds are usually of wooden construction and are therefore not practical for use with a caster.

Many people desire a headboard in conjunction with their studio type bed. Such a bed structure, with headboard attached, is known generally in the trade as a Hollywood bed. To construct a Hollywood bed, the trade has adapted what is known as a Hollywood bed frame. This bed frame is an independent unit made of structural angle iron with permanently attached metal legs and means for attaching a headboard directly to the bed frame. This frame supports the box-spring and mattress and depends entirely on the strength of its structural iron members for this purpose, receiving no help from the strength provided by the wooden framework at the base of the box-spring.

It is an object of the present invention to produce an inexpensive Hollywood type bed structure by providing means for using the in-built strength of the wooden framework at the base of the box-spring for support and obviate the necessity of an independent metal frame. At the present time there is no structure available which supports a headboard in co-operation with removable legs.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an attractive furniture supporting leg which can be disassembled for shipment and which can be readily assembled and attached to a wooden frame by any novice.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a structure which attaches to an ordinary headboard and carries the weight of the headboard down to the detachable legs of this invention.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide for adjusting the position of the headboard support with relation to the position of the removable legs.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description and explanation thereof.

In order to provide a full understanding of the invention, reference will be had to the accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure 1 illustrates the attachment of the removable leg of the present invention to a box spring and illustrates the attachment of the headboard supporting structure to the headboard; V

Figure 2 is a vertical cross section taken through on embodiment of the leg;

2,823,392 Patented Feb. 18, 1958 Figure 7 is a view taken along lines 77 of Figure 5;

'Figure 8 is a detailed view of another embodiment of the leg structure, a portion of the box spring, the headboard supporting structure and a portion of the headboard;

Figure 9 is a partial detailed perspective view of a portion of the leg supporting structure shown in Figure 8;

Figure 10 is a top elevational view showing the box spring, headboard supporting structure and headboard of Figure 8; and

Figure 11 is a view taken along lines 6-6 of Figure 8.

In the drawings, referring to Figures 1 through 4, the leg or furniture supporting member 1 is attached by means of a wood screw 2, extending upwardly from the top thereof, to the wooden framework 3 at the base of a piece of furniture such as the box springs. It will be appreciated that four or any greater number of supporting legs maybe used depending on the size and weight of thepiece to be supported and the desires of the individual. The headboard 5 shown in Figure 1 is supported by a headboard supporting means 6 which carries the weight of the headboard to the legs 1 adjacent the headboard.

The leg structure illustrated in Figures 1 through 7 comprises a substantial tubular upright member 7. Extending outwardly from one end of the upright member 7 is a wood screw 2 which has a base 8 adapted to fit securely into one end of said upright member. One illustrative way of forming an end of the upright member 7 to accommodate and securely hold the base 8 of the wooden screw is shown in Figure 4. A caster socket 9 is positioned at the opposite end of said upright member 7 and the shank of said housing is disposed in the upright member in much the same manner as the base of the wood screw. A circular plate 10, having a hole 11 in the center thereof, is disposed between the upright member and the wood screw. A ferrule 12, having a hole in the center thereof, is disposed between the base 13 of the caster housing and the upright member 7. An inverted truncated cone 14 is positioned around the upright member 7 with the base thereof positioned between the inside of the ferrule 12 and the outside of the upright member 7. The top of the cone is positioned adjacent the perimeter of the circular plate 10.

It will be appreciated that each of the above elements can be preassembled. Also the parts can be partially or wholly disassembled for shipment or other reason and can be readily reassembled in the following manner. The circular plate 10 is placed in position and the base 8 of the wood screw 2 is passed through the hole in the plate into one end of the upright member 7 so that the plate is held firmly in position. The cone 14 is positioned around the upright member and adjacent to the periphery of the circular plate 10. Next the ferrule is placed in position and the shank of the caster socket 9 is passed through the hole in the ferrule into the opposite end of the upright member thus holding the ferrule in place. When the leg is attached to the furniture framework by means of the wood screw 2 the cone 14 will be held firmly in position.

The cone 14 may be constructed of any decorative material such as colored plastic, etc. or may be constructed of a more rigid material such as a metal if the added support resulting from suchconstruction is desired. It will be appreciated that the caster socket 9 may house a caster 15.

Referring to Figures 8 through 11 another illustrative embodiment of a leg structure is shown. The substantially tubular upright member 7, the wood screw 2 and the caster socket 9 are assembled in much the. same manner as described above and may be shipped as an assembled or partially disassemble unit. The housing which extends from the base of the upright member to the elevation of the top thereof is comprised of a pair of channel housings 16 which are joined at their bottom by a plate 17. This plate 17 has a hole 18 in the center thereof through which the shank of the caster socket 9 passes to secure this base against the bottom of the upright member. The tops of the channel housings 15 are held in spaced relation from the upright member by means of riveted plates 19 and .20, the plate 19 hav ing a hole in the center thereof similar to the circular plate 10 of the previously described embodiment.

The channel housings 16 may be constructed of any material such as plastic but in general in this embodiment the construction is usually of metal to aid in carrying the weight of the furniture down to the supporting caster 15 or other base member.

Referring to Figures 5 through 8, 10 and 11, the headboard supporting structure 6, comprises an L-shaped member 21 which has a hole 22 extending through the horizontal leg thereof. The box spring 4 is housed in this L-shaped member 21 and is given support by the horizontal leg of this member. One of these L-shaped members 21 extends along the bottom and side of each of the two corners of the bedspring adjacent the headboard. The wood screw 2 of the leg 1 is passed through the hole 22 and screwed into the framework 3 of the box spring to hold the box spring in position on the leg. When the leg is brought up tight, by means of the wood screw 2, against the horizontal leg of the L-shaped member 21, the L-shaped member is held in a horizontal position and is supported by the leg in cantilever fashion.

The portion of the L-shaped member 21 which extends beyond the corner of the bedspring 4 towards the headboard is attached to a bracket 23 by any ordinary means, such as rivets 24. A second bracket 25 is attached to the headboard 5 by means of bolts 26. As

illustrated, the second bracket 25 is a U-shaped member on varying widths of headboards as desired. The U- r shaped bracket 25 may also be provided with an extension 29 having slots 30 therein. to provide further latitude in adapting the supporting structure to varying widths of headboard. When assembled as described, the weight of the headboard will be carried through the bracket 25 into the bracket 23 and from there onto the L-shaped member 21 with the ultimate support coming from the leg 1. It will be appreciated that many similar forms of brackets and connecting means may be used to carry this weight from the headboard to the supporting leg.

In line with the currently popular do-it-yourself" trend, it will be seen that all of the elements of the leg and of the headboard supporting structure can be broken down to provide a very compact shipping carton and yet the What is claimed is:

-1. In a bed structure, a wooden frame box spring, a headboard, a leg adapted to support each corner at the head end of said box spring, L-shaped members adapted to extend along the lower sides of said frame adjacent the corner and to extend horizontally toward the headboard, said members each having a hole therein, a wood screw attached to and extending upwardly from each leg through said hole into said frame, and a means of attaching said L-shaped members to said headboard to support the same.

2. In a bed structure, a wooden frame box spring, a headboard, a leg adaptedto support each corner at the head end of said box spring, L-shaped members adapted to extend along the lower sides of said frame adjacent the corner and to extend horizontally toward the headboard, said members each having a hole therein, a wood screw attachedto and extending upwardly from each leg through said hole into said frame, a bracket attached to the outer end of each L-shaped member, a second bracket attached to each side of said headboard in a manner such that the position thereof can be adjusted with respect to said side and a means of securing the respective brackets together to support said headboard.

3. A leg adapted for supporting furniture having a wooden framework at the base thereof, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a wood screw having a base adapted to fit securely inone end of said upright member, a caster socket adapted to fit securely in the opposite end of said upright member, a substantially planar circular member having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the caster socket and the tubular member, and an inverted truncated cone with the lower end thereof disposed adjacent the lower end of the tubular member and the upper end thereof disposed adjacent the periphery of said circular member.

4. A leg adapted for supporting furniture having a Wooden framework at the base thereof, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a wood screw having a base adapted to fit securely in one end of said upright member, a caster socket adapted to fit securely in the opposite end of said upright member, a first plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the upright member and the wood screw, a second plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the caster socket and the upright member, a pair of U-shaped housings extending along opposite sides of said upright member and means for attaching said U-shaped housings to said first and second plates at opposite ends thereof.

5. A leg adapted for supporting furniture having a wooden framework at the base thereof, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a wood screw having a base adapted to fit securely in one end of said upright member, a ferrule adapted to fit securely to the opposite end of said upright member, a plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the upright member and the wood screw and a decorative housing extending from said ferrule to the periphery of said plate.

6. A leg adapted for supporting furniture having a wooden framework at the base thereof, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a wood screw having a base adapted to fit securely in one end of said upright member, a caster socket adapted to fit securely in the opposite end of said upright member, a substantially planar member having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the wood screw and the tubular memfirst plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the upright member and the wood screws, a second plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the caster socket and the upright member,

. a pair of housings extending along opposite sides of said upright member and means for attaching said housings to said first and second plates at opposite ends thereof.

8. A leg adapted for supporting furniture, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a screw threaded element having a base adapted to fit securely in one end of said upright member, a caster socket adapted to fit securely in the opposite end of said upright member, a first plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the upright member and the screw threaded element, 2. second plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the caster socket and the upright member, a pair of housings extending along opposite sides of said upright member and means for attaching said housings to said first and second plates at opposite ends thereof.

9. In a bed structure, a box spring, a headboard, a leg adapted to support each corner at the head end of said box spring, L-shaped members adapted to extend along the lower sides of said frame adjacent the corner and to extend horizontally toward the headboard, said members each having a hole therein, a fastening means attached to and extending upwardly from each leg through said hole into said frame, and a means of attaching said L-shaped members to said headboard to support the same.

10. In a bed structure, a box spring, a headboard, a leg adapted to support each corner atthe head end of said box spring, L-shaped members adapted to extend along the lower sides of said frame adjacent the corner and to extend horizontally toward the headboard, said members each having a hole therein, a screw threaded element attached to and extending upwardly from each leg through said hole into said frame, a bracket attached to the outer end of each L-shaped member, a second bracket attached to each side of said headboard in a manner such that the position thereof can be adjusted with respect to said side and a means of securing the respective brackets together to support said headboard.

11. A leg adapted for supporting furniture, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a screw threaded element having a base adapted to fit securely in one end of said upright member, a caster socket adapted to fit securely in the opposite end of said upright member, a substantially planar circular member having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the caster socket and the tubular member, and an inverted truncated cone with the lower end thereof disposed adjacent the lower end of the tubular member and the upper end thereof disposed adjacent the periphery of said circular member.

12. A leg adapted for supporting furniture, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a screw threaded element having a base adapted to fit securely in one end of said upright member, a ferrule adapted to fit securely to the opposite end of said upright member, a plate having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the upright member and the screw threaded element and a decorative housing extending from said ferrule to the periphery of said plate.

13. A leg adapted for supporting furniture, comprising a substantially tubular upright member, a fastening means having a base adapted to fit securely in one end of said upright member, a caster socket adapted to fit securely in the opposite end of said upright member, a substantially planar member having a hole in the center thereof disposed between the fastening means and the tubular member and a decorative housing extending from said caster socket to the said planar member.

14. A leg adapted for supporting furniture which comprises a screw threaded element at the top thereof adapted for attachment to said furniture, a glider element at the botom thereof, a load bearing means for transferring the load of the furniture from said screw threaded element to said glider element, a decorative housing extending upward from said glider element, a substantially planar member positioned adjacent the screw threaded element adapted to maintain said decorative housing in a substantially concentric position relative to said supporting means.

15. A leg adapted for supporting furniture which comprises a decorative housing, supporting means extending longitudinally within said decorative housing and adapted to support a vertical load, the upper end of said supporting means being adapted for attachment to furniture, the lower end of said supporting means being adapted to receive and transmit the furniture load to the fioor, and a spacer member positioned adjacent to the upper end of said supporting means and adapted to maintain the said decorative housing in a substantially concentric position relative to said supporting means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 88,977 Muller Apr. 13, 1869 981,113 Richards Jan. 10, 1911 1,694,940 Herz Dec. 11, 1928 2,263,050 Rein Nov. 18, 1941 2,527,603 Wallance Oct. 31, 1950 2,558,625 Pearce June 26, 1951 2,736,042 Parrish Feb. 28, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 4,163 Great Britain 1902 138,687 France Sept. 13, 1880

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US88977 *Apr 13, 1869 Improved folding-bedstead
US981113 *May 5, 1909Jan 10, 1911Albenart CompanyWork-bench.
US1694940 *Jun 16, 1926Dec 11, 1928Herz Bed CompanyBed
US2263050 *Apr 14, 1941Nov 18, 1941Meyer ReinBed carcass
US2527603 *Apr 23, 1947Oct 31, 1950Wallance Donald AFurniture leg
US2558625 *Nov 9, 1946Jun 26, 1951A J Logan CompanyLaterally adjustable bed frame
US2736042 *Apr 15, 1953Feb 28, 1956 Combination headboard
FR138687A * Title not available
GB190204163A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3009170 *Feb 8, 1960Nov 21, 1961Wali A AkramHeadboard clamp and bedframe combination
US4015808 *Dec 15, 1975Apr 5, 1977Living Walls Inc.Combined leveling bracket and shock absorber for cabinet
US4042199 *Dec 19, 1975Aug 16, 1977Clifford Wilbur WinklerMolded furniture leg
US7437783 *Aug 30, 2005Oct 21, 2008L&P Property Management CompanyEasily assembled bed frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/310, 5/53.2
International ClassificationF16B12/00, F16B12/52
Cooperative ClassificationF16B12/52
European ClassificationF16B12/52