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Publication numberUS2823427 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1958
Filing dateMar 8, 1956
Priority dateMar 8, 1956
Publication numberUS 2823427 A, US 2823427A, US-A-2823427, US2823427 A, US2823427A
InventorsKuhlman Leo E
Original AssigneeKuhlman Leo E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient floor construction
US 2823427 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 18, 1958 L. E. KUHLMAN 2,323,427

RESILIENT FLOOR CONSTRUCTION Filed ,March' 8, 1956 Z7 L150 5 KUf/LM/IN United States Patent-O 2,823,427 RESIILIENT FLOOR CONSTRUCTION I LeoEKuhlman, Detroit,'Mich. Y Application March a, 1956, Serial 180,570,314

' '2Claims. ciao-+ This invention relates to building construction and has particular reference to. resilient, or .active floors, such as disclosed in my co-pending application Serial No. 221,647, filed Apr. 18, 1951, nowPatent 2,743,487 of which this application may be considered a continuation in part. x

Itis an object of this invention to 'generally improve resilient floors, such as disclosed in my co-pending application, and to provide such a floor, with improved means to positively control the vertical and lateral movement of the floor, under all operating conditions.

Another object of the invention is to provide positive means for preventing the floor from jumping upwardly under the reflex action of the springs.

A further object of the invention is to provide improved means for directly carrying and evenly distributing any imposed load on the finished floor, over the widest area, upon the downward flexing of the springs.

A still further object of the invention is to provide means for limiting the movement and absorbing the shock, caused by any extreme lateral movement of the finished floor under the influence of the springs, when in use.

Another object of the invention is to provide means for anchoring the finished floor in place and preventing the floor from buckling or warping.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved stops for the downward flexing of the springs, which stops also serve as stiffeners for the finished floor.

Another object of the invention is to retard the transmission and reflection of sound by the floor.

Another object of the invention is to provide underfloor ventilation for retarding rot and deterioration.

Another object of the invention is to provide shoe means around the perimeter of the floor, which are secured to the walls and overlie the floor, and serve as means to prevent dust and dirt from collecting in the space between the walls and floor, and also serve to help limit the reflex movement of the springs supporting the floor.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent as the description proceeds, reference being made from time to time to the accompanying drawing forming part of the within disclosure, in which drawing:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary plan view, with parts in section, of a structure embodying the invention, with the sub-floor and finished floor removed.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary, perspective view, with parts in section, and parts broken away and illustrating the upper left hand corner of the structure shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a section taken substantially on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

a section taken substantially on the line 3-3 "ice Fig. 5 is a section taken substantially on the line 5--5 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a section taken substantially on the line 6-6 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 7 is a section taken substantially on the line 7--7 ofFig.1.

Referring n'ow'more particularly to the drawing, it will. bev understood that'in the embodiment herein disclosed, the reference character 11 indicates the side walls of a building structur,.having a concrete under-floor 12, upon which rests a plurality of rectangular steel plates 13, which are positioned to receive the curved portions 14 (Figs. 4 and 7) of the leaf springs 15, which leaf springs 15. are bolted, as'at' 16, to the longitudinal members.17, whichserve as joists for supporting the sub floor 18 and the finished floor 19. A layer of slaters felt 20, and a layer or deadening felt 21, are preferably interposedbetweenthefinished floor 19-and sub-floor 18, as shown in Figures 2 to 7,' to assist in cushioning the sound. Itwill be noted that the leaf springs 15 normally lie perpendicular to the axes of the longitudinal members 17', except along the perimeter of the floor, wherethe springs. 15A are positioned beneath the members 17A,,inparallel. relation. In order to provide adequate length for the longitudinal members 17, it is necessary to provide splicing blocks 22 (Fig. l).

Also positioned beneath the sub-floor 18, as shown in Figs. 2 and 7, I provide stiffening members 23. These stiffening members 23 are deeper than the longitudinal members 17, with which they are parallel, and serve as direct load carrying members, when the floor is-moved downwardly, a predetermined distance upon the flexing of the leaf springs 15. The members 23 also serve as limiting stops for the downward movement of the sub-floor and finished floor, upon the flexing of the springs 15, and evenly distribute the weight of the finished floor and subfloor over a substantially wide area. The stop and load members 23 are spaced at suitable intervals beneath the sub-floor.

In order to help control the lateral movement of the sub-floor 18 and finished floor 19, under the influence of the springs 15, and prevent warping and buckling of the floor, and to limit the upward movement of the sub-floor 18 and finished floor 19, upon the reflexing of the springs 15, I provide a novel means for anchoring the sub-floor and finished floor as shown in Figs. 1 and 6. Before the concrete comprising the under-floor 12 completely sets, I embed therein, at spaced intervals, a plurality of bolts 24. The bolts 24 are set in the concrete under-floor 12, so that their free ends may be received in suitable bores 25, formed in the longitudinal members 17, whereby the longitudinal members 17 are free to slide on the bolts 24 a limited distance. As shown in Figs. 6, the sub-floor 18 is recessed, as at 26, to accommodate the nut 27 of the bolt and a large washer 28, which is positioned beneath the nut. The bolts 24, the nuts 27 and the washers 28, in cooperation with the upper faces of the longitudinal members 17, limit the upward movement of the sub-floor 18 and finished floor 19 upon the reflex action of the springs 15. On the other hand, the bolt heads 27 coming in contact with the finished floor 19, assist in, limiting the downward movement of the sub-floor 18 and finished floor 19, upon the flexing of the springs 15, This action is in addition to the limiting action provided by the stop and stiffening members 23 as hereinabove described.

In order to absorb the shock and to help limit the lateral movement of the sub-floor 18 and finished floor 19, I provide lateral springs 15B which are secured to the sides of the members 17A and ride against the wall 12. In addition to using the lateral springs 15B, I also con floor 18 and the finished floor 19. These shoes 29x31? positioned so that: the finished floor-is in easy contact with the shoes, when the springs 15' are in their normal position, asshown in Figs. 3. andS.

It is believed that: the operationtof. thedeviceis obvious from the foregoing description; 6

From'theforegoing, it will be seen that I haveprovided an active, resilient floor construction, in which the movement of the floor in all directions is, carefully controlled.

Having described my invention what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a building construction, including fixed walls, a concrete under-floor, a sub-floor and a finished floor, the combinationof a plurality of longitudinal members for supporting said sub-floor and finished floor, arcuate spring members secured at their centers-tosaid longitudinal members, in spaced relation, the springs on one member being staggered with respect to the springs on an adjacentmember, elongated stiffening members secured. to, the. underside Qt said. sub-floor, e rallelto said,

longitudinal members and at right angles to said springs, said stifiening members, being deeper than said longitudinal members and serving as direct floor load carrying members, when said springs have been flexed a predetermined distance.

2. The structure of claim 1, including a plurality of bolts deeply embedded in said concrete under-floor and extending upwardly to be slidablyreceived in passageways formed in said longitudinal, members, there being means on said bolts co-operating with said longitudinal members, whereby to limit the reflexingof said springs,

' and help limit thelateral movement of said finished floor and sub-floor.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNI-TED SKATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1156206 *Jan 10, 1913Oct 12, 1915Union Fibre CompanyCar insulation.
US1302578 *Sep 11, 1917May 6, 1919Stevens Partition & Floor Deadener CoFloor construction.
US1977496 *Sep 28, 1931Oct 16, 1934Nat Wood Products CoFloor expansion joint
US2328651 *Dec 15, 1941Sep 7, 1943Kern Nathaniel CFloor molding
US2466613 *Dec 18, 1945Apr 5, 1949Richardson Ray MPortable knockdown floor construction
US2743487 *Apr 18, 1951May 1, 1956Kuhlman Leo EResilient floor construction
CH273892A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3087206 *Apr 20, 1960Apr 30, 1963Narragansett Gymnasium EquipmeFloating floor anchor
US3090164 *Sep 25, 1961May 21, 1963United States Gypsum CoWall construction and resilient runner therefor
US3094745 *May 9, 1960Jun 25, 1963Stout Gerald JFloor construction for basementless buildings and the like
US3273296 *Jun 17, 1963Sep 20, 1966Glenn E SoulonDetachable baseboard and flooring trim assembly
US4443989 *Dec 7, 1981Apr 24, 1984Lycan-Howard, Ltd.Dance floor construction
US4831806 *Feb 29, 1988May 23, 1989Robbins, Inc.Free floating floor system
US4860516 *Jan 15, 1988Aug 29, 1989Koller Gregory VPortable cushioned floor system
US4888927 *Jun 19, 1987Dec 26, 1989Daiken Trade & Industry Co., Ltd.Floating floor
US4995210 *May 16, 1989Feb 26, 1991Robbins, Inc.Free floating floor system and method for forming
US5365710 *Feb 12, 1993Nov 22, 1994Connor/Aga Sports Flooring CorporationResilient subfloor pad
US5388380 *Jul 13, 1992Feb 14, 1995Robbins, Inc.Anchored/resilient sleeper for hardwood floor system
US6883880Dec 19, 2002Apr 26, 2005Leo FloresFloating sub-top and support member
US8931226 *Jan 27, 2011Jan 13, 2015Tarkett Gdl S.A.Shock-absorbing prefabricated wood flooring
US20130104479 *Jan 27, 2011May 2, 2013William ThorntonPrefabricated wood flooring
CN102906356A *Jan 27, 2011Jan 30, 2013塔吉特Gdl公司Base flooring and flooring system
CN102906356B *Jan 27, 2011Sep 23, 2015塔吉特Gdl公司基底地板和地板系统
EP0636756A1 *Jul 28, 1994Feb 1, 1995Johann Dipl.-Ing. FischerResiliently-cushioned flexible floor
EP2529062A2 *Jan 28, 2011Dec 5, 2012Connor Sport Court International, LCC.Synthetic floor tile having partially compliant support structure
EP2529062A4 *Jan 28, 2011Mar 18, 2015Connor Sport Court International LlcSynthetic floor tile having partially compliant support structure
WO1990014137A1 *May 25, 1989Nov 29, 1990Koller Gregory VPortable cushioned floor system
WO1992014522A1 *Sep 4, 1991Sep 3, 1992Connor/Aga, Connor Forest Industries, Inc.Subflooring assembly for athletic playing surface
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/402, 52/480
International ClassificationE04F15/22
Cooperative ClassificationE04F15/22
European ClassificationE04F15/22