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Publication numberUS2823919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1958
Filing dateMay 12, 1950
Priority dateMay 12, 1950
Publication numberUS 2823919 A, US 2823919A, US-A-2823919, US2823919 A, US2823919A
InventorsWilson L Scruggs
Original AssigneeWilson L Scruggs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Racing-game apparatus
US 2823919 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 18, 1958 w. SCRUGGS 2,823,919

RACING-GAME APPARATUS Filed May 12, 1950 v 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY (5 C.

A RNEY Feb. 18, 1958 w. L. SCRUGGS RACING-GAME APPARATUS a sheets-sheet 3 Filed May 12, 1959 O HO O O O o 2 m m 4 8 4 4. 4 Wk 2 5 3 2 O l O O 0 O O 6 6H 4 8 Z a I- I 6 4 3 7 6 a O Hm O O O o O mom 2 6 0 0 O S 6 6 I Q I12 I l l I I I m I m MN m m T m 4 WW 2 7 9 I INVENTOR. WlLfiSOI L. SCRUGGS BY ATRNEY United States Patent RACING-GAME APPARATUS Wilson L. Scruggs, Coral Gables, Fla.

Application May 12, 1950, Serial No. 161,529

12 Claims. (Cl. 273-134) The invention relates to games for diversion, especially racing games, and aims to afford each player frequent and varied opportunities to use foresight and judgment for furthering his success.

In one specific aspect the game of the invention includes a race-track that is continuous and that comprises parallel continuous lanes running lengthwise of the track and including section marks spaced irregularly along the lanes, the lanes being connected by interlane paths which advantageously may be distributed irregularly along the track. In the specification and claims: by irregularly is meant arbitrarily, i. e., non-systematically; by a continuous track or lane is meant one closed on itself, i. e., endless, as for example an oval track or lane; and two lanes are considered parallel if, and only if, they are substantially equidistant throughout their length.

Each lane may be regarded as constituted of portions or sections, each section including a section mark, for example a dot, and extending from that mark half way to the next such mark in each direction in the lane.

The lanes are for movement therein of racing-pieces in a race along the track. Each racing-piece is moved in turn and has a number of moves in a race. The extent of each move may be determined primarily by chancecontrolled means, which may include dice or the equivalent. Advantageously, each lane may be a line, the lines being separated by spaces. The section marks measure the moves of the racing-pieces by marking steps in the moves, and advantageously may be dots, such as small circular areas for example, in the lines forming the lanes. Each lane preferably includes more section marks than any lane it encloses. The interlane paths cross the interlane spaces to connect the lanes. Advantageously, each of certain of the interlane paths is a line forming a path leading obliquely outwardly from a lane and forwardly along the race-track to a lane nearer the outside rail of the race-track, and each of others of the interlane paths is a line forming a path leading obliquely inwardly from a lane and forwardly along the race-track to a lane nearer the inside rail of the race-track. Preferably, each interlane path is a single-step path connecting two successive section marks in different lanes, the two lanes thus connected being adjacent lanes in some cases and nonadjacent lanes in other cases.

The interlane paths facilitate maneuvering the racingpieces by enabling them to be shifted from lane to lane through the paths. The shift of a racing-piece from one lane to another may be, for example, to block or pass or avoid being blocked by a competitor, or to take a shorter route (a route of less section marks) to the tracks finish line or to a photo-finish area that is provided at the finish line as described hereinafter.

The irregularity of distribution of the section marks along the lanes connected by interlane paths affords each player, at frequent and irregular intervals along the track during a race, various interesting choices of maneuvers or plays for his racing-piece, and requires foresight and judgment for estimation of the probability that particular 2,823,919 Patented Feb. 18, 1958 choices will become available and for estimation of the probable consequences of choosing particular plays. The variety and the irregularity of occurrence of the choices afforded, and the difiiculty of arriving at the j-ust-mentioned estimates, are increased by the irregularity of the distribution of the interlane paths along the track and by the single-step connection of non-adjacent as well as adjacent lanes.

The interlane paths crossing the interlane spaces gives flexibility in arrangement of the interlane connections in the track having the parallel continuous lanes. For example, such paths may readily be made to cross one another without creating confusion, and two section marks connected by a path need not be contiguous nor have portions coextensive in the direction along the track, nor be in adjacent lanes. The flexibility facilitates incorporation of a considerable number of the parallel continuous lanes and the interlane paths in a track of limited size. The flexibility is increased by having the section marks small marks, such as dots, for example, and having each interlane path in the form of a line.

A specific feature of the game relates to a set of databearing cards which diifer as to their specific data and one of which may be selected by chance before the start of each race and placed on an odds board that is marked on the tracks infield, with legends that are provided on the odds board and data on the selected card properly aligned for determining odds offered on each racing-piece to win, and for determining amounts of play-money returnable on each racing-piece to win, place or show, and for cooperating with the dice or their equivalent to determine certain playing moves of certain of the racingpieces.

Another specific feature of the game relates to a set of cards each of which pictures all of the racing-pieces in a different running order, and one of which may be selected by chance under prescribed conditions near the end of a race in case racing-pieces then simultaneously occupy a photo-finish area that is provided at the tracks finish line, the running order shown by the selected card determining the winners as between the racing-pieces then occupying the photo-finish area.

Other objects, aspects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following description and claims.

Fig. 1 of the drawings is a plan view of a game board embodying certain features of the invention; Fig. 2 shows simulated one-, two-, five-,and ten-dollar bills, illustrative of play-money that may be used in betting; Fig. 3 shows simulated coins, in twenty-cent pieces, illustrative of playcoins that may be used to supplement the bills in paying winnings, for example; Fig. 4 is a'view of chance-controlled means, shown as six special dice, used to determine or influence in accordance with chance the playing-moves of dogs or other racing-pieces along a race-course on the game-board, as regards selection of the racing-pieces to be advanced and as regards the extent to which the selected racing-pieces are to be advanced; Fig. 5 is a view, in elevation, of six racing-pieces, shown as representing racing-greyhounds; Fig. 6 represents entry cards, for example thirty in number, which indicate odds and amounts of money that may be won, and which cooperate with the dice in determining certain playing-moves of the dogs; and Fig. 7 represents photo-finish cards, for example thirty in number, used to determine winners in close finishes.

Figure 1 Marked on the marginal portion of game-board or panel 1 is a continuous race-track or race-course 2 comprising parallel inside and outside rails 23 and 24, respectively,.and between them, parallel continuous lanes 15 to 20 which run lengthwise of the track and in which the racing-pieces (of Fig. are to be moved. The racingpleces may represent any desired racing-creatures or obects to be raced, for example greyhounds or race-horses. For brevity they may be referrred to as dogs. In each lane are section marks 14, shown as dots or small circular areas or spaces, which may be distributed irregularly along the lane and in the case of lanes to 19 are so shown. Each lane may be regarded as made up of sections, each section being marked by a section mark 14 and extending from that mark half way to the adjacent section marks 14 in each direction in the lane. The section marks or spaces 14 indicate steps or stages of movement of the dogs, and thus measure the moves of the dogs. A move may be an advance of one or more section marks or spaces.

The game-board or panel may be of any suitable type presenting a fiat playing surface. It may be rigid, or if desired, foldable or flexible so that it can be folded. or rolled up when not in use. An odds board 3 shown marked on the tracks infield 1n the center of the game-board has a marked rectangular space or portion 4 for placement of a pack of entry cards, and a marked space or portion 5 for placement of a pack of photo-finish cards. Thus the odds board forms a support for the entry cards and the photo-finish cards.

At the left-hand side of the space 4 the odds board bears a fixed row of legends that are respectively identified with the dogs, these legends being the numbers 1 to 6. Perpendicular to this row of legends, at the top of the space 4 is a second row of fixed legends on the odds board. The first of the legends of this second row is a heading for an odds column carried by the top card of the pack of entry cards that is to be placed in the space 4 at the start of the game, with the top card face up. The remaining three legends in this row are respectively identified with different courses of play that are open to choice by the players with respect to the dogs. For each player these courses of play in a race are that he may bet on his dog to win, to place, or to show. As explained later, the entry card has tabular data arranged in columns that are to be aligned with the legends at the top of the space 4, the data being arranged also in horizontal rows that at the same time are to be aligned with the legends at the left of the space 4, so that the legends will facilitate the reading of the tabular data.

Pictured on the odds board to add touches of realism are a track-conditions indicator 6, a post time indicator 7, a race-number indicator 8, a red light 9 to indicate that the race just run has been oflicially decided, and an indicator 10 for the ofiicial time of the race.

The number of lanes provided equals the maximum number of dogs that it is desired to have compete in a race. At the start of a race the dogs are positioned at the starting line 11, each in a different lane.

The starting line is at right angles to the lanes and includes a row of six of the section marks or spaces 14, one in each lane, or in other words, one for each dog. Each of these starting spaces may be numbered and colored individually to correspond with the number and color of one of the dogs. Due to space limitations, numbers on the starting spaces are omitted from the drawing. These numbers may be 1 to 6, counting outwardly from the first or inside lane 15.

A finish line 12, at right angles to the lanes, includes a row of six of the spaces 14, one in each lane. These six spaces may all have a distinguishing characteristic. For example, they may all be of a distinctive color or tone, for instance black.

The length or course of a race may be for example, from the starting line 11 counter-clockwise around the track once, for instance, and then onward to the finish line 12. If desired, the finish line may serve also as a starting line, to shorten the race to only a lap.

Each lane may have any desired number of spaces 14. Preferably, each has more than the next inner lane. For

example, lane 15 is shown as containing thirty spaces, counted from the starting line to the finish line in one and a fraction laps counter-clockwise; lane 16, the second lane, as containing thirty-two spaces; and lanes 17, 18, 19 and 20, the third, fourth, fifth and sixth lanes, as containing thirty-four, thirty-six, thirty-eight and forty spaces, respectively.

A photo-finish region or area 13, referred to hereinafter, is shown at the finish line. This area may have a distinguishing characteristic. For example, it may be light gray.

Rules of the game may provide that no dog is permitted to move to or through a space 14 occupied by another dog. Therefore, a dog may be blocked by another ahead of him in the same lane. The hereinafter described advances to be made by the dogs in accordance with indications given by the dice and the entry cards, are subject to limitation by blocking.

A number of dotted lines 21 are distributed irregularly along the race-track, each line connecting some space 14 in some lane to some near space 14 in some other lane. These dotted lines 21 slant toward the right when facing counter-clockwise around the track, and are used to indicate that at such lines a dog may be moved thcrealong Y to a lane on the right. A number of solid lines 22 are distributed irregularly along the race-track, each line con-- necting some space 14 in some lane to some near space 14 in some other lane. These solid lines 22 slant toward the left when facing counter-clockwise around the track, and are used to indicate that at such lines a dog may be moved therealong into a lane at the left. Each of these interlane paths 21 and 22 thus connects two section marks or spaces 14 in different lanes, and preferably these lanes so connected are, as shown, adjacent lanes in various cases and non-adjacent lanes in various other cases. The shift of a dog through an interlane path from one lane to another may be, for example, to block or pass or avoid being blocked by a competitor or to take a shorter route (a route of less section marks or spaces 14) to the finish line 12 or to the photo-finish area 13.

Figure 2 Make-believe bills are shown at 25', 26, 27 and 28 in denominations of one, two, five and ten dollars. Any

convenient amount and denominations of such playmoney may be provided, for use in betting.

Figure 3 At 29 are shown make-believe coins, each representing twenty cents ($.20). Any convenient number of such play-coins may be provided, of any convenient denomination or denominations. They may be of metal or other suitable material. At the start of each game, all of them may be in charge of the Banker, who may be stakeholder. During the game, he may use them to supplement the bills, in paying winnings, for example.

Figure 4 As chance-determining means, six special dice 30 are shown, for determining or influencing by chance, according to throws of the dice, playing moves of the dogs along the track. The throws of the dice may influence selections of the dogs to be moved as well as amounts by which the selected dogs are to be advanced. The six dice may be duplicates, or in other words, may be identical in appearance. In each throw of the dice during the game, all six are cast simultaneously, i. e., by one throw. Considering any one cube, it six sides bear numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. These numbers correspond to the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 on the six dogs, respectively. At each throw of the dice (subject to limitation by blocking as referred to above), each dog is to advance one space for each die that turns up the dogs number, except that on the first cast in each race, the favorite dog and the longshot" dog (which are selected by one of the entry cards of Fig. 6) have their moves determined as follows. If the dice turn up the number of the favorite he advances a number of spaces two greater than the number of dice that turn it up. If the dice turn up the number of the longshot he advances a number of spaces one less than the number of dice that turn it up. Thus, the favorite is given an advantage and the longshot a penalty, relatively to the other four dogs. That advantage is: an advance increase of two spaces provided the favorites number turns up. That penalty is: an advance decrease of one space provided the longshots number turns up.

Instead of the cubes shown, conventional dice or any suitable chance-determining means may be provided. However, the cubes bearing numerals are preferred for simplicity and ease of reading.

In a race, at each throw of the dice the dogs are moved in a prescribed order, as for example, in an order determined by lot at the start of the race, or by way of further example, in the order of the numbers borne by the dogs (the move of dog N0. 1 being made first, the move of dog No. 2 next, the move of dog No. 3 third, etc.). This latter order will be assumed herein.

Figure 5 Six racing-pieces 31 to 36 are shown, bearing identifying numbers 1 to 6, respectively. Each racing-piece is of a different color, or carries a different color, so the racing-pieces may be more readily distinguished from each other. Although shown as shaped in representation of greyhounds, the racing-pieces may be formed to represent race-horses or any suitable creatures or objects to be raced.

Figure 6 At 37, 38 and 39 are shown entry cards. They may be thirty in number, for example, of which only three are shown. The entry cards are all similar in form and general appearance but differ as regards the specific data they hear. The entry cards are shuffled at the start of the game and the pack is placed in the spaced marked 4 on the odds board 3, preferably with all of the cards face down except the top card. At the start of each succeeding race in the game, the top card of the pack is to be removed from the pack and succeeded in the top position by the next card, which is forthwith to be turned face up. The top card, faced up, has its data columns aligned with the legends at the top of the space 4 and its horizontal rows of data aligned with the legends at the left-hand side of the space, the legends facilitating the reading of the tabular data on the card. Putting the legends on the odds board rather than on each card avoids unnecessary duplication and moreover gives the odds board an added touch of realism. The top card indicates, in its first column, the odds for each dog entered in the race, and indicates, in its second, third and fourth columns, the amounts of money to be paid on each dog should the dog win, place or show. For example, there are six horizontal lines of data, the top line applying to dog No. 1, the second line to dog No. 2, the third line to dog No. 3, etc. Each line indicates the odds and the amounts to be paid on the dog to which it applies. (Each amount indicated is on the basis of a $2.00 bet.) One of these six lines, which is suitably distinguished (for example, by boldness of type, as shown in each of the three cards depicted in Fig. 6), applies to the dog with the lowest odds, i. e., the favorite. Another of these horizontal lines, suitably distinguished (for ex ample, by shading of the area in which the data appears, as shown in each card depicted in Fig. 6), applies to the dog with the highest odds, i. e., the longshot. (Distinguishing characteristics that may be used instead of the bold type and the shading are colors, for instance.) As referred to above and further explained hereinafter, at the start of each race the favorite may be given an advantage and the longshot a penalty, relatively to the other four dogs.

Figure 7 At 40, 41 and 42 are shown photo-finish cards. They may be thirty in number, for example, of which only three are shown. The photo-finish cards are all similar in form and general appearance but differ in detail. Each photo-finish card has on its face six pictures representing, for example, racing greyhounds. Each of the six pictures is differently numbered, as shown, the numbers being 1 through 6. Each of the six pictures may be at a different distance from an indicated finish line such as the line 43 shown on card 42.

The photo-finish cards are shuffled at the start of the game and the pack is placed face down at 5 on the odds board 3. In a race, it may occur that, just before the finish of the race, at the end of the moves of the dogs for a given throw of the dice, two or more dogs occupy spaces 14 in the photo-finish area 13. Such occurrence may be considered a photo-finish or, in other words, an apparent tie between those dogs for first, second or third place. Then the Judge turns the top card at 5 face up and the relative order in which those dogs are to be regarded as finishing in the race is determined by taking it to be the same as the relative order of the correspondingly numbered pictures on that card with reference to the indicated finish line such as 43. Upon such use of that card to decide an apparent tie, it is removed from the top of the pack. When another apparent tie occurs, the next card in the pile likewise is turned face up, used to decide the apparent tie and removed from the top of the pile, etc. Having the photo-finish cards several times as numerous as the dogs substantially eliminates probability of exhausting the photo-finish deck or anticipating the finishing order that a card about to be drawn will show, even though a game may embrace a number of races each having a plurality of photo-finishes.

Description of play A game may include any predetermined number of races, for instance, ten. With the apparatus shown, two to six persons may play. One player may serve as Banker, another as Judge. Post positions are drawn by lot, for each race; and this selects a dog for each player as his entry in the race, since the dogs are respectively marked in accordance with the post positions in the starting line. Each player may bet play-money on his dogs, the bets being placed with the Banker. If desired, the player with greatest total winnings for the game may be considered the winner of the game.

At the start of each game, the Banker distributes some of the play-money equally among the players, for their use as stakes during the game, reserving the rest for payment of winnings, etc. The shuttled pack of photo-finish cards is placed face down at 5. Each player places his dog in its proper space 14 in the starting line in preparation for a race (in this case the first race of the game). This proper space is the space having the same distinctive number and color carried by the dog. Then the top card from the shuttled pack of entry cards is turned face up at 4, and the players place their bets with the Banker.

To determine the extent of the first move of each dog, the Judge casts the six dice simultaneously. It will be assumed, by way of example, that one of the dice turns up a number 1, a second turns up a number 3, and the remaining four each turn up a number 5. Then dog No. 2, dog No. 4 and dog No. 6 do not move. Dog No. 1 advances three (i. e., 1+2) spaces if he is favorite, zero (i. e., 1-1) spaces if he is longshot, and one space if he is neither. The entry card at 4 shows whether he is favorite, longshot, or neither. Dog No. 3 advances three (i. e., 1+2) spaces,' advances zero (i. e. 1-1) spaces, or in other words, remains at the starting line 11, or advances one space, according to whether he is favorite, longshot, or neither. Dog No. 5, having had his number turned up by four dice, advances six (i. e., 4+2) spaces, three (i. e. 41) spaces, or four spaces, according to whether he is favorite, longshot, or neither.

The moves for the first throw of the dice having been completed, the Judge makes the second cast, third cast, etc., until the race is completed. For each cast after the first, throughout the race, each dog advances one space for each die that turns up his number, the moves of the dogs for these later casts being unaffected by any indication on the entry card positioned at 4.

Upon the completion of the race the Banker pays the winning players the amounts that the entry card face up at 4 indicates is due them. For example, if that card is as shown at 37 in Fig. 6 and dog No. 5, dog No. l and dog No. 3 win, place and show, respectively, then the Banker pays play-money as follows: to the player whose dog is No. 5, $4.00 for each $2.00 that he bet on his dog to win, $3.40 for each $2.00 that he bet on his dog to place, and $2.60 for each $2.00 that he bet on his dog to show; similarly, to the player whose dog is No. 1, $4.20

Rules of the game may provide that, near the end of a 0 race, to reach the finish line a dog must have the number of steps of his move as determined by the dice just suffice to carry him to the line, and that a dog, unless blocked, is entitled to his move for a given east of the dice regardless of how many dogs may be in the finish line 12 or photo-finish area 13.

The rules may also provide that if two or more dogs near the end of a race occupy spaces 14 in the photofinish area at the end of the moves of thosedogs for a given cast of the dice, they are involved in a photo-finish, or in other words, they are finishing in the race in an apparent tie with each other. When all moves of dogs for that cast have been completed, the Judge turns the photofinish card at 5 face up and examines it. It decides the apparent tie as explained in the description of Fig. 7. For example, if the dogs on the track that are in the apparent tie are the No. 1 dog and the No. 4 dog, and this card pictures the No. 4 dog as ahead of the No. 1 dog, then the Judge announces that the photograph finish is ofiicial and the No. 4 dog has finished in the race ahead of the No. 1 dog.

The photo-finish area can increase suspense. For example, supposing the three players whose move-turns are first, second and third in order have dogs in the finish line near the end of a race, possibly some dog that has not entered the photo-finish area may enter it and thereby become involved in a photo-finish with the three dogs that are in the finish line.

The photo-finish area may include any desired section marks or spaces 14 that are in the region just before the finish line 12. However, the photo-finish area advantageously may include more spaces 14 in the outer lanes than in the inner lanes, for example as shown. Such form for the area can enhance interest toward the end of a race by affording players opportunities to shorten their dogs routes to the photo-finish area through advantageous use of the interlane paths and is desirable for inducing players to avoid unduly crowding their dogs into inner lanes at points along the track just preceding places, such as the turn into the home stretch, where the inner lanes generally have less spaces 14 than the outer lanes. Undue concentration of dogs in the inner lanes might result in excessive blocking.

The lines 21 and 22 enable players to attempt to maneuver their dogs into favorable positions as they proceed along the course, in order to gain various advantages, as for example, to block or pass competitors or avoid being blocked by them, or to take shorter routes (routes of less spaces 14) to the photo-finish area or the finish line.

To illustrate shortening the route to the photo-finish area it may be assumed that a dog is near the end of a race and is in the second lane and at the space 14 just before the starting line 11. Then in order to reach the photo-finish area via that lane only, he would need to move five steps, whereas in order to reach the photofinish area via paths to the third, fourth and fifth lanes, he would need to move only three steps.

To illustrate shortening the route to the finish line, it may be assumed that a dog is in the first lane and at the sixth space 14 ahead of the starting line 11. Then in order to reach the finish line via that lane only, he would need to move eleven steps, whereas he could reach it in but ten steps by moving at once to the second lane, then moving one step in the second lane, then returning to the first lane and proceeding via the first lane to the finish line 12. The step taken in the outer or second lane is defined by two section marks whereas the coextensive portion of the inner or first lane (coextensive portions of two lanes meaning portions included between two imaginary lines perpendicular to the lanes) has three section marks or spaces 14 defining two steps. However, while the latter portion has more section marks than the coextensive portion of the outer lane (i. e., the second lane), nevertheless the succeeding portion of the inner lane extending to the finish line includes but eight spaces 14 whereas the coextensive portion of the outer lane (the second lane) includes nine spaces 14. Thus, considering these two mutually exclusive portions of the first lane and these two corresponding portions of the second lane, a first portion of the inner lane includes more of the spaces 14 than a coextensive first portion of the outer lane, whereas the second portion of the outer lane includes more of the spaces 14 than the coextensive second portion of the inner lane, and an interlane path leads from a point of the inner lane ahead of its said first portion to the said first portion of the outer lane, and another interlane path leads from a point of the outer lane ahead of its said second portion to the said second portion of the inner lane. So a dog may go from the inner lane to the outer to shorten his route along a portion of the track, and then return to the inner lane to shorten his route along another portion of the track.

Moreover, if he thus returns to the first lane he may thereafter shorten his route to the photo-finish area (from six steps to five, without lengthening his route to the finish line) by taking any one of four courses that may be open. One of these is from the section mark in the first lane that is on the starting line, to the second, third and fourth lanes. Another is from the just-mentioned section mark to the second and third lanes and then along the third lane to the photo-finish area. A third route is from the just-mentioned section mark to the second lane, then one step along that lane, and to the third lane. The fourth route is from the section mark in the first lane that is just after the starting line, to the second and third lanes. On the other hand, instead of returning to the first lane he can (without lengthening his route to the finish line) take any open one of three routes to the photo-finish area that have the minimum number of section marks, and thus shorten his route to the photo-finish area from seven or six steps to five. One of these routes is along the second lane to the third section mark before the starting line, then through the interlane path to the fourth lane, then two steps along the fourth lane, and then through the interlane path to the fifth lane. A second route extends through the first to the starting line, then through the interlane path to the fifth lane, and then along the fifth lane to the photo-finish area. The third route follows that just traced to the fifth lane, and then extends through the interlane path to the sixth lane and the photofinish area.

From the foregoing descriptions of illustrative possible routes it is apparent that the irregularly distributed section marks and interlane paths offer many and varied opportunities for maneuvering with foresight and judgment, and thus heighten interest.

The entry cards afford players opportunities to use judgment for furthering their success. For example, at the start of a race, a player may use judgment in selecting anticipated finishing positions for his dog (and also in deciding what amount to bet on each selected position), by considering: (I) the exposed entry cards information as to the amounts payable on his dog for winning, for placing and for showing; (2) the exposed entry cards information as to which dog is assigned an advantage and which a penalty in moving, and his estimate of the effect of these assignments on his dogs chances to win, to place and to show; (3) his estimate of the effect of his dogs post position in the starting line upon its chances to win, to place and to show, taking into account such factors as (a) the differences in the number of section marks in different lanes, (b) the differences in the number of photo-finish section marks in different lanes, and (c) the opportunities afforded by the interlane paths for dog-maneuvering to take advantage of (a) and (b); and (4) his estimate of the effect his dog-maneuvering skill, relative to that of other players, will have on his dog's chances to win, to place and to show.

To play the game without betting play-money, each player whose dog wins, places or shows in a race may be credited with a number of points equal to the amount in dollars of play-money that the entry card for the race shows to be returnable for that dog in that finishing position, or the rules may provide (1) that in order for a player to be credited with any points, he must, at the start of the race, after exposure of the top entry card, select a single anticipated finishing position for his dog (i. e., predict a single finishing position for the dog) and the dog must finish in a position at least as advanced as the selected position, and (2) that the number of points with which the player shall thereupon be credited shall equal the amount in dollars of make-believe money that the entry card for the race shows payable for that dog in the selected finishing position. If the selection were unrestricted, in each race each player naturally would select each of the first three finishing positions as his dogs finishing positions. Necessity for restriction can be removed by betting, i. e., by playing for stakes (or in other words by requiring for each selection or prediction by a player of a finishing position for his dog, a pledge or deposit of some token or counter that is to be forfeited unless the prediction is realized). These stakes may be make-believe money (i. e., play-money without real or actual value) so that nothing of value is risked. When such stakes are played (i. e., bet) on racing participants and forfeited or won, they facilitate score keeping, by serving as tokens of points lost and won. In a game played without play-money, the winner of the game may be considered to be the player who accumulates the greatest total of points for all of the races in the game, and, as in the case of a game played with play-money, the entry cards can select dogs to be given the advantage and the penalty that are set forth above.

The arrangements described above are illustrative of the application of the principles of the invention. Numerous other arrangements may be devised by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Game apparatus comprising a race-course having a finish line, lanes adapted for movement of racing-pieces along said lanes toward the finish line, and interlane paths adapted for movement of the racing-pieces through said paths from lane to lane, said lanes including section marks certain of which in the region of the finish line are indicated as section marks simultaneous occupancy ofwhich by racing-pieces near the end of a race involves the occupants by prescription in an apparent tie, one of said lanes including a greater number of said indicated section marks than another, certain of said lanes and paths providing a route for racing-pieces that extends from a point of said other lane at a section mark other than said indicated section marks to one of said indicated section marks in said one lane, said route having less section marks than the route through said other lane fromsaid point to the nearest of said indicated section marks in said other lane.

2. A game including in combination a set of playingpieces readily distinguishable from each other, a pack of cards adapted for chance selection therefrom of one card at a time, and a support for the selected card, said support having marked thereon two fixed perpendicular rows of legends, those of one row being respectively identified with said playing-pieces, those of the other row being respectively identified with different results that may be achieved with said playing-pieces, said cards being movable with respect to said legends and each card having marked thereon a table of data arranged in horizontal rows that are adapted for simultaneous alignment with the legends, respectively, of one of said fixed rows of legends, and arranged also in vertical columns that are adapted for simultaneous alignment with the legends, respectively, of the remaining fixed row of legends with said first-mentioned alignment in effect, on each card said data indicating variously valued rewards for achievement of said results with said playing-pieces, said indicated rewards varying from card to card.

3. Game apparatus including, in combination, a racetrack comprising parallel lanes extending lengthwise of the track, racing-pieces adapted to be moved along said lanes, said lanes including section marks for indicating steps in the moves of said racing-pieces, the number of said section marks being different for different lanes, said racing-pieces having characteristics by which they are readily distinguishable from each other, said track including a starting line having post positions for said racing-pieces, respectively, paths for connecting said lanes, said paths extending obliquely to said lanes therebetween and being irregularly distributed along said track and serving to indicate prescribed points in the lanes at which said racing-pieces may be moved from lane to lane obliquely forwardly by passage through said paths, a pack of cards adapted for chance selection of a card therefrom at the start of a race, and a support for the selected card, said support having marked thereon two fixed perpendicular rows of legends, those of one row being respectively identified with said racing-pieces, those of the other row respectively designating different finishing positions from which, at the start of a race, a player may select for a particular racing-piece a finishing position he anticipates therefor, said cards each being movable with respect to said legends and having marked thereon a table of data arranged in horizontal rows that are adapted for simultaneous alignment with the legends, respectively, of one of said fixed rows of legends, and arranged also in vertical columns that are adapted for simultaneous alignment with the legends, respectively, of the remaining fixed row of legends with said first-mentioned alignment in effect, on each card said data including various amounts each of which indicates, at the start of a race, odds then offered for a selection then made by a player, from said indicated finishing positions, of a finishing position for a racing-piece which, in the race, actually finishes in a position at least as advanced as that selected, said amounts differing from card to card, certain of said cards indicating different racing-pieces, respectively, as the favorite.

4. A game comprising, in combination, a race-track,

racing-pieces adapted to be moved along said track in a race between said racing-pieces, said track including a starting line having different starting positions for said racing-pieces, a set of cards for chance selection of a card therefrom at the start of a race, each card having marked thereon data indicating rewards for winning offered for the respective racing-pieces in said starting positions upon the selection of the card and each card also having thereon markings indicating one of the racing-pieces as entitled to an advantage and another as subject to a penalty in said movement, said indications on certain of said cards differing from card to card as regards the relative amounts of said offered rewards and as regards which racing-piece is entitled to said advantage and which is subject to said penalty, and chance means operable for yielding data suitable for use with said advantage and penalty indications on the selected card for indicating the extent of moves to be given said racingpieces.

5. A deck of cards adapted to be shufiied and adapted for resolution of apparent tie finishes in a racing game by chance selection and withdrawal of cards from the deck, one card at a time, each card of the deck picturing all of the same group of readily distinguishable racingpieces in readily apparent finishing order, the order differing from card to card.

6. A game comprising a race-course in combination with a deck of cards adapted for chance selection therefrom of one at a time, each of said cards picturing the race contestants in a different racing-order, said racecourse having at the finish line an indicated area joint occupation of which by race contestants nearing the end of a race involves the joint occupants in a close finish,

7. A game including a race-course having at the finish line an indicated region simultaneous occupation of which by racing-pieces near the end of a race involves such simultaneous occupants in a close finish, in combination with a number of indicators adapted for chance selection therefrom of one at a time, each indicating an assumed finishing order of all racing-pieces involved in the race, the order differing from indicator to indicator.

8. A game including, in combination, various racingpieces readily distinguishable from each other by inspection, cards adapted for chance selection therefrom of one at a time and at least as numerous as said racing-pieces, each card picturing all of said racing-pieces in readily distinguishable forms in an assumed finish in which various racing-pieces have different finishing positions, the finishing order of the racing-pieces varying from card to card, and a race-course having a finish line and having lanes that are equal in number to said racing-pieces and are adapted for stepwise moves of said racing-pieces in turn along said lanes toward the finish line in a race including a number of rounds of such moves, said lanes including section marks which measure the steps of the moves and a number of which in the region of the finish line are distinguished as section marks simultaneous occupancy of which by racing-pieces at the close of a round of move near the end of a race involves such occupants in a prescribed apparent tie finish to be resolved by inspection of one of said cards, said number of section marks exceeding the number of said lanes.

9. A game including, in combination, various racingpieces readily distingushable from each other by inspection, cards, several times as numerous as said racingpieces. adapted for chance selection from said cards of one card at a time, each card picturing all of said racingpieces in readily distingushable forms in a different racing order, and a race-course having a finish line, parallel continuous lanes adapted for stepwise moves of said racing-pieces in turn along said lanes toward the finish line in a race including a number of rounds of said moves, and interlane paths adapted for movement of said racingpicces through said paths from lane to lane, each of said lanes including section marks which mark steps of the ill fgoves, said lanes having certain of their section marks in the region of the finish line distinguished as section marks simultaneous occupancy of which by racingpieces at the close of a round of moves near the end of a race is pre scribed as involving the occupants in an apparent tie to be resolved by inspection of one of said cards selected by chance, one of said lanes having more of the distinguished section marks than a lane it incloses, and a route for said racing-pieces including one of said interlane paths and extending from a point in said inclosed lane to one or said distinguished section marks in said inclosing lane, such route containing less steps than the shortest route in said inclosed lane from said point to one of said distinguished section marks in said inclosed lane.

10. Game apparatus comprising, in combination, racing-pieces having characteristics by which they are readily distinguishable from each other, a race-track having a linish line, lanes adapted for movement of said racingpieces along said lanes toward the finish line, and interlane paths adapted for movement of said racing-pieces through said paths from lane to lane, chance means for influencing the extent of the moves of said racing-pieces, other chance mean for modifying said influence comprising cards for chance selection of: one at the start of a race, each card bearing data indicating rewards for winning ofiered for the respective racing-pieces upon the selection of the card and also indicating one of the racingpieces as entitled to an advantage and another as subject to a penalty in said movements, said one racing-piece and said other being the racing-pieces for which said offered rewards are the lowest and the highest, respectively, said indications on certain of said cards differing from card to card as regards the relative amounts of said offered rewards and as regards which racing-piece is entitled to said advantage and which is subject to said penalty, and a set of cards each picturing said racing-pieces in a different racing order, said track having at the finish line an indicated area simultaneous occupany of which by racingpieces involves such occupants in an apparent tie which may be resolved by chance selection of a card from said set.

11. A deck of unconnected rectangular cards adapted to be shuttled, each card picturing all of a group of readily distinguishable racing-pieces in readily apparent finishing order, the order differing from card to card, for each card the leading racing-pieces position on the card, with respect to the direction of travel, being substantially the same as for the other cards.

12. A deck of unconnected rectangular cards adapted to be shuffled, each card picturing all of a group of readily distinguishable racing-pieces in readily apparent finishing order, the order differing from card to card, the cards several times outnumbering the racing-pieces, for each card the leading racing-pieces position on the card, with respect to the direction of travel, being substantially the same as for the other cards.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 259,950 Hoevenbergh a- June 20, 1882 1,268,659 Wright June 4, 1918 1,407,095 Smythe Feb. 21, 1922 1,448,201 Cornell Mar. 31, 1923 1,544,591 Murray July 7, 1925 1,570,475 Geraci Jan. 19, 1926 1,622,638 Frost Mar. 29, 1927 1,660,505 Hacker Feb. 28, 1928 1,701,741 Watling Feb. 12, 1929 2,473,675 Boreszewski June 24, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS 373,807 France Jan. 22, 1907 253,009 Great Britain Jan. 10, 1926 548,977 Great Britain Nov. 2, 1942

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Referenced by
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US3057623 *Mar 14, 1960Oct 9, 1962Barry P BarnesJockey game
US3462151 *Jul 13, 1966Aug 19, 1969Joseph J ParisiChance controlled racing game apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/246
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00082
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10