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Publication numberUS2824308 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1958
Filing dateApr 29, 1954
Priority dateApr 29, 1954
Publication numberUS 2824308 A, US 2824308A, US-A-2824308, US2824308 A, US2824308A
InventorsDuncan Rea E
Original AssigneeBorg Warner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Louvered screen eyeglass
US 2824308 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 25, 1958 R. E. DUNCAN LOUVERED SCREEN EYEGLASS Filed April 29, 1954 United States Patent() LOUVERED SCREEN EYEGLASS Rea E. Duncan, Northbrook, Ill., assignor to Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application April 29, 1954, Serial No. 426,321

6 Claims. (Cl. 2-14) This invention pertains, in general, to eyeglasses, particularly to anti-glare sun glasses of a type that are distinguished from the conventional type, by providing within its enclosed frame portions in place of, or adjacent to the usual lens means, a louvered type of wire fabric, which may be employed to protect the eyes of the user.

The present case incorporates the improved wire fabrics such as is disclosed in the Ewing Patent No. 2,194,222.

As one embodiment this invention pertains to a new and improved type of sunglasses that have within its frames a wire screen composed of a plurality of longitudinally extending warp wires and a plurality of successive ller wires for the elongated cross-section therebetween, and disposed with their major surfaces at a predetermined angle to the plane of the frame for the purpose of reflecting and absorbing the direct rays of the sun without distorting the vision of the wearer.

In comparison with the present invention, the ordinary type of dark or smoked sunglasses, although reducing the glare or direct'rays from the sun, always present the wearer with surroundings of artificial coloring, depending on the shading of the lens. This type of sunglasses not only distorts the true colors as seen by the ordinary eye, but at the same time limits the wearers vision. In addition, the vision of the wearer of such colored glasses is greatly hampered whenever he enters a building or shaded area, which although adequately lighted for the normal eye, seems excessively dark to the wearer.

. An additional strain may be caused on the wearers vision in that the type of sunglasses he may wear, may not have lenses that are suited for his eyes, since a number of the less expensive sunglasses, which do not fall into the expensive prescription lens category, have supposedly plain glass, but being of the unground type are often subject to a variety of distortions.

Accordingly, an important object and accomplishment r of the present invention is to provide a pair of sunglasses that correct the above-discussed objections, by giving the wearer a normal colored unrestricted view of the surrounding area as it is naturally presented, while at the same time, providing protection to the wearer by shading his eyes from the direct rays of the sun.

-lt is an additional obje-ct to provide sunglasses that not only reflect objectionable rays of the sun, but are also capable of diffusing and absorbing them due to the` black-edged finish of the louvered wire fabric that is incorporated into the enclosed frame portion.

A further object of my invention is to provide antiglare eyeglasses, having a louvered type of wire fabric that is so disposed and positioned within the frame as toV substantially reflect and absorb the direct light rays from the headlights of approaching vehicles.

VIt is a further object to provide an improved spectacle 2,824,308 Patented Feb. 25, 195s ICC Another object of my invention is to provide an improved inexpensive spectacle frame that is suitable as an advertising novelty.

Also an object of my invention is to provide an improved pair of eyeglasses with lenses formed of a transparent material, that have a plurality of such ribbon-like filler wires either disposed within the material and fixed at a predetermined angle to the normal plane of the frame for substantially reflecting the direct rays of the sun or mounted closely adjacent to said transparent material as a supplement thereto.

An additional object is to provide eyeglasses with a louvered type of Wire fabric that is secured adjacent to the usual lens means and possesses a certain amount of resiliency that serves to protect the lens from excessive shock and flying particles such as large grit, small stones, etc.

In addition, it is an Vobject of my invention to provide an improved pair of sunglasses using prescription lenses that have a plurality of ribbon-like illerwires disposed within and fixed at a predetermined angle for substantially reflecting the direct rays of the sun or otherwise protecting the eyes.

lt is an object of my invention to also provide antiglare eyeglasses with lenses having a plurality of ller wires fixed at a predetermined angle to the normal plane that may be removed, interchanged, reversed or rotated in order to be effective both during the day against the rays of the sun and at night against the lights of appreaching vehicles.

One other object of my invention is to provide eyeglasses having lenses partially formed with a plurality of ribbon-like filler wires that are disposed vertically within the frames for the purpose of dellecting the headlights of approaching vehicles without distortingV the wearers vision.

As a final object andaccomplishment of this invention, the inventor seeks'to provide a pair of louvered screen eyeglasses that will both advantageously and satisfactorily perform the functions required of it, 'while succesSfully combining the features of simplicity and durability and at the same time, remaining Veconomical to manufacture. f

The above and other objects, featuresand advantages ofthis linvention disclosed herein, will become more apparent to persons skilled in the art from reading of the following specification and claims, taken in connection with the appended drawing, which forms apart of this specification and wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the protective anti-glare eyeglasses embodying the features of this invention and illustrating the eyeglasses in assembled relationship. This form of the device lends itself particularly to use as an advertising novelty;v

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the one-piece flexible frame depicted in Fig. 1 and illustrating the frame in its unfolded and unassembled condition;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view showing a section of the louvered screen used for the lens of the anti-glare eyeglasses depicted in Fig; l;

Fig. 4 is a front section view of a modified form embodying additional features and showing the louvered screen lens encased in a transparent material and retained by a conventional eyeglass frame; j

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view of the modified form depicted in Fig. 4, this view being taken substantially upon the plane of the line 5--5, in Fig. 4;

' ing a one-piece flexible frame that illustrates the remov-fability and reversability of the removable screenlenses;` and Fig. 8 is a front sectional view of a modified form embodying additional features and showing ribbon-like filler wires encased on one side of the usual lens means that is retained by a conventional eyeglass frame.

With reference to the drawing, wherein like reference numerals identify the same parts in each of the different views, the illustrated louvered screen eyeglasses comprises, in general, a frame assembly indicated in its entirety by the numeral 10 and formed of flexible material to define the shape as shown in Figs. l and 2,. and which is particularly adapted to receive a louvered wire fabric lens indicated in its entirety by the numeral 11.

T he illustrated frame assembly 10 as depicted in Fig. may be formed of a unitary flexible piece of cardboard, sheet material of plastic composition, or other materials having similar characteristics to define similar top and bottom sections 12 and 13. The two sections 12 and 13 may be folded along the fold line 14 to form` a pocket or retaining means for insertion of the lenses 11. Each section 12 and 13 has corresponding apertures 1S, 16, i7 and 18 that form openings for the lenses 11. An additional aperture 19 is shaped from both sections 12 and 13, to form a bridge portion 20 for the wearers nose, when thc two sections are folded together.

The top section 12 of these two similar sections of the frame assembly 1), have hooked arm portions or temple pieces 21 and 22 extending from each side of the top section and are connected by fold means 23 and 24 or any other suitable connecting means. These arm portions serve to support the eyeglasses on the wearer, in the usual conventional manner.

Upon examining the frame assembly 10 in assembled relationship as depicted in Fig. 1, it can be seen that a pocket or retainer means is formed for the insertion of the lenses 11. After insertion of the lenses 1l the two sections are secured together, for example, by staples 25 or any other suitable means. The two similar sections 12 and 13 now form a front member of the frame that has two ring-like rims 26 and 27 separated by the bridge portion 20. Each of the rim members 26 and 27 having an inner groove 28 and 29 therein for accommodating a part of the nasal side of the bridge portion 20.

The arm portions 21 and 22 are connected so that they may be folded one over the other to form a fiat, compact package, that is easily carried in a persons pocket or purse. The same arm portions 21 and 22 are of such a width that advertising may be easily printed on them, thus permitting the eyeglasses to serve as a novel advertising medium.

The lenses 11 that are to be fitted in the rims 26 and 27 are composed of a louvered wire fabric or screen, a portion of which is shown in Fig. 3. This wire fabric comprises a plurality of successive filler wires 30, formed to define an elongated ribbon-like cross-section. The filler wires are arranged so that their front sides 31 are parallel to each other and are disposed at an angle to the plane of the fabric.

In order for the filler wires to be evenly spaced from cach other and be maintained in parallel relationship it is preferable that they be locked in position. This isadvantageously accomplished by the provision of a plurality of pairs of warp wires 32 that are interwoven by integrating twists of the warp wires 32 between each successive filler wire 30.

As it readily can be seen the use of this type of wire fabric in the lenses of a spectacle frame is a new and novel approach to provide an economical pair of sunglasses. Not only does this type of lens permit unlimited visibility, but it successfully and completely defiects the strong light rays of the sun, instead of filtering the light rays or reducing the light intensity like the majority c-f the sun glasses on the market today. The wearer is given a greater protection from direct light rays andI yet is able to view the surrounding area in its natural color without the usual artificial discoloring.

In order to further assure the eyes of the wearer from being subjected to the direct and indirect rays of the sun the wire fabric may be given a black-edge finish, which serves to absorb the sun rays as well as deflect them.

Attention is now directed to Figs. 4 and 5 which show a modified form contemplated by this invention. As can be seen, a spectacle frame 33 of conventional construction formed of a plastic or metal-like material is shown. iviuuntrd in the rim 34 is a lens 3S, which is formed of a transparent material 35. Disposed within said transparent material 36 and fixed at a predetermined angle to the normal plane of the lens are a plurality of parallel ribbonlike filler wires 37 substantially similar in construction and operation as hereinbefore described with respect to filler wires 3f). These may be supported at the desired angle by the transparent material itself or may be held in position by warp wires 33, which are substantially similar in construction and operation as hereinbefore dcscribed with respect to warp wires 32.

An additional modification is seen in Fig. 6 in which a spectacle frame 39 is depicted encasing a usual lens means 4t) and a wire fabric 41 in close relationship. The wire fabric is substantially of the same construction and operation as that described in the previous forms and comprises a plurality of parallel ribbon-like filler wires 42 and a plurality of warp wires 43. The wire fabric 41 is fixed within the frame means 39 such as shown in Fig. 6 and serves to protect the usual lens means 4f) from fiying particles such as small rocks, large grit, etc. ln addition the wire fabric l1 possesses a certain amount of resiliency which offers considerable protection against breakage whenever a pair of spectacles are accidentally dropped.

Another modification is seen in Fig. 7 wherein louvered screen lenses 44 and 45 are depicted as separate square sections of louvered wire fabric that can be removed from the individual pockets 46 and 47 formed in a frame assembly 48. The louvered screen lens 44 and 45 may he rotated either ninety, one-hundred eighty or two-hundred seventy degrees, or may be reversed and then rotated in like manner. This permits the wearer to choose eight different positions for each lens and enables him to obtain the most desired result from his anti-glare eyeglasses whenever any particular reflections or light rays are interfering with his particular endeavor. For example, the louvered screen lenses 44 and 45 may be normally positioned to protect the user from the light rays of the sun during the day while at night when driving a vehicle, the user may rotate the lenses 44 and 45 ninety degrees to the left (from the wearers viewpoint) and protect himself from being blinded by the lights of approaching vehicles, or the user may rotate the lenses 44 and i5 onehundred eighty degrees and thus greatly eliminate from a body of water the reflections that may be interfering with his navigation.

One other embodiment of my invention is illustrated in Figs. S in which a plurality of ribbon-like filler wires 49 with their fiat surfaces ata predetermined angle are disposed vertically within only a part of the usual lens means 5f) which may be of any transparent material. These particular types of lenses may be incorporated in any conventional type of frame assembly such as shown at S1. The vertical arrangement of the louvered filler wires in part of the lens (preferably the left hand side from the wearers viewpoint) serves to defiect and diffuse the number of light rays that may he introduced at an angle which would normally impair the vision of the wearer. An example of this occurs when the wearer is driving a vehicle at night and is bothered by the bright lights of the approaching vehicles in the left hand lane. By having a pair of glasses of the above-mentioned type, it is possible for the wearer to turn his head slightly to the right and thus avoid the brightness of these lights while still being able to maintain a clear view of the road ahead.

The above described Wire fabric in this invention may be incorporated into any number of types of frames in a variety of different Ways, including incorporating the fabric in a transparent lens employing a plastic or glass which makes it particularly useful as a pair of anti-glare eyeglasses. There is also numerous other arrangements where the above-mentioned wire fabric is incorporated with a pair of glasses by hinged or pivot means, thus utilizing the advantages of the louvered screen fabric by rotating the fabric into close relationship with the usual lens means.

My improved anti-glare eyeglasses comprise a number of advantages derived from the louvered type of wire fabric that is incorporated into the above discussed frame portions and lenses. The chief advantage of which being the protection of the wearers eyes against all types of light rays whether direct or indirect by deflection, diffusion and absorption.

Another important advantage that mustbe considered, is the novelty of my invention and the possibilities it possesses as an advertising medium. Since it is of an inexpensive construction and of easy adaptation to the vast majority of wearers, there are a number of uses for this invention that make it an excellent promotional idea for other goods as well as a popular sales item in itself.

Additional features of my invention are seen in the various modifications illustrated, and these modifications suggest numerous other possibilities and adaptations that could be employed with other types of eyeglasses. Although the particular structure shown and described above is well-adapted for carrying out the various objects of my invention, it will, of course, be understood that these various modifications, changes, and substitutions may be made Without departing from the spirit thereof. The subject of my invention is therefore to be construed to include all such modifications, changes and substitutions as may come within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a pair of sunglasses having in combination a ribbon-like wire fabric lens and a frame assembly, said Wire fabric lens comprising a portion of longitudinally resilient screen composed of a plurality of pairs of longitudinally extending warp wires and a plurality of parallel ribbon-like filler wires held in position by integrating twists between the said warp wires and adapted to t into said frame assembly, and said frame assembly comprising two sets of members spaced transversely from each other including a nose piece therebetween, and hooked arm portions extending from the outside of each member for holding the frame assembly on the wearer, thereby providing light-ray control to protect the eyes of the wearer from the direct rays of the sun.

2. Anti-glare eyeglasses comprising a pair of rectangular frames with corresponding apertures spaced transversely from each other, a nose piece between said frames, louvered screen lenses mounted in the apertures of said frames, said screen having a black-edged finish and including a plurality of pairs of longitudinally extending warp wires and a plurality of parallel ribbon-like filler Wires held in position by integrating twists between the .said warp Wires, whereby said screen substantially reects and absorbs the direct rays of the sun without distorting the surroundings.

3. Anti-glare sunglasses comprising a pair of rectangular frames, spaced transversely from each other, a nose piece between said frames, and Wire fabric lenses mounted in said frames said lenses having a plurality of generally parallel even spaced ribbon-like filler wires with an elongated cross section disposed with their major surfaces at an angle to the plane of the said frames and a plurality of pairs of warp wires embracing said filler wires and fastening the same in place, whereby said lenses are arranged to substantially reect the direct rays of the sun without distorting an individuals vision.

4. Anti-glare eyeglasses comprising a pair of circular frames spaced transversely from each other, a nose piece between said frames, lenses mounted in said frames, said lenses being formed of transparent glass-like material having a plurality of parallel ribbon-like filler wires and a plurality of pairs of warp wires disposed within, said ribbon-like filler wires being fixedat an angle to the normal plane of the lens and held in position by integrating twists between the said Warp wires, whereby said lenses are so constructedas to protect the eyes of the wearer from the direct rays of the sun.

5. A pair of anti-glare eyeglasses having a frame assembly for encasing a usual lens means in close relationship with a louvered screen lens, said louvered screen lens having a black-edged finish comprising a plurality of pairs of longitudinally extending warp wires and a plurality of parallel ribbon-like filler wires held in position by integrating twists between the said Warp wires and adapted to fit into said frame assembly along with said usual lens means, whereby said eyeglasses substantially reflect, diffuse and absorb the objectionable light rays.

6. Anti-glare eyeglasses comprising a pair of frames spaced transversely from each other, a nose piece between said frames, lenses mounted in said frames, said lenses being formed of transparent material and having a plurality of parallel ribbon-like liller wires disposed within, said ribbon-like ller wires being vertically xed within one side of each lens, whereby said filler wires are so arranged as to substantially deflect the headlights of approaching vehicles without distorting an individuals vision.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,605,418 Wittkopf Nov. 2, 1926 2,232,455 VHebrard ..r Feb. 18, 1941 2,382,566 Heckman Aug. 14, 1945 2,419,917 Robeson Apr. 29, 1947 2,545,906 Watkins Mar. 20, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 228,696 Switzerland Dec. 1, 1943

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2983271 *May 12, 1958May 9, 1961Frances Beck Memorial FundSurgical mask
US3030628 *Dec 27, 1960Apr 24, 1962Crosson Jean HAnti-ray eye shield
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Classifications
U.S. Classification2/433, 351/44, 2/12
International ClassificationG02C7/00, G02C7/16
Cooperative ClassificationG02C7/16
European ClassificationG02C7/16