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Publication numberUS2825322 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1958
Filing dateJul 23, 1954
Priority dateJul 23, 1954
Publication numberUS 2825322 A, US 2825322A, US-A-2825322, US2825322 A, US2825322A
InventorsBurley Jr Samuel T, Payton Coy V
Original AssigneeBurley Jr Samuel T, Payton Coy V
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Repeating toy gun
US 2825322 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 4, 1958 s. 'r. BURLE'Y, JR, ET AL 2,825,322

' REPEATING TOY GUN l Filed July 23, 1954 Samuel T. Bur/e J1:

Coy V. Payton INVENTORS B; 24mm M United States Patent 9 REPEATIN G TOY GUN Samuel T. Burley, Jr., Arlington, Va., and Coy V. Payton, Fort Smith, Ark.

Application July 23, 1954, .Serial No. 445,426

2 Claims. (Cl. 124-19) This invention'relates in general to improvements in toys, and more specifically, to a toy gun for shooting resilient projectiles.

The primary object of this invention is to provide a toy repeating gun which is so constructed whereby it will shoot resilient projectiles in the form of rubber bands and the like, the repeating gun being so constructed whereby a plurality of projectiles may be loaded therein at one time and fire repeatedly, the mounting for the projectiles being of such a nature whereby each of the projectiles will have the same effective firing force.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved repeating gun which is intended to fire projectiles including enlarged end portions, the repeating gun having a firing mechanism which is so constructed whereby it accommodates the enlarged endof the projectiles and retains .them against release until released through use of the trigger-mechanism.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved toy gun which is of such a structure whereby it may be alternatively utilized to fire a resilient rubber band projectile which, in turn will drive or project an auxiliary projectile.

These together with-other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure l .is a side elevational view of the toy gun which is :the subject of this invention and shows the same arranged to fire both a rubber band projectile and an auxil- V iar=y projectile, there being provided support means for the auxiliary projectile;

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the my gun of Figure 1 andshows "the supportfo-r the auxiliary projectile being rotated to an .out-of-the-way:position and the toy .gunloaded with a different typeofprojectile;

Figure 13 is a fragmentary enlarged top plan view of the. firing mechanism of the toy gun;

.Fig lre 4..is. a fragmentary vertical'sectional view taken through the :firing mechanism of the toy gun of Figure 2 andshows the manner in which a plurality of projectiles are iloaded within the firing mechanism at onetime, :the firing mechanism .beingshown in aninoperative position;

Figure 5 is a view similar to igure 4 and shows the firingrmechanism in the stage of being moved to a released position;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to Figure 4 and shows the firing mechanism immediately after one of the projectiles has been released;

Figure 7 is an enlarged rotated elevational view of one of the projectiles utilized in combination with the gun in its form of Figure 2, an enlarged end portion of the projectile being broken away and shown in section in order to clearly illustrate the manner in which a rubber band portion of the projectile is connected thereto; and

Figure 8 is an elevational view of the enlarged portion of the projectile of Figure 7.

Referring now to Figure 2 in particular, it will be seen that there is illustrated the repeating toy gun which is the subject of this invention, the gun being referred to in general by the reference numeral 10. The gun 10 in-' cludes an elongated barrel 12 which may be in the form of a solid wooden member, if so desired. Secured to the rear portion of the barrel '12 is a stock 14. The stock 14 is provided intermediate its ends and at the end of the barrel 12 with a firing mechanism housing which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 16.

The housing 16 is formed of a pair of channel-shaped cross-sectional plates '18 which are secured together and to the stock 14 by suitable fasteners 20. Upper portions of the side plates 18 are cut away intermediate the ends thereof to provide clearance for a star wheel which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 22. The star wheel 22 is mounted on a transverse shaft 24 which is suitably journaled in the side plates '18. It is to be noted that the transverse shaft 24 seats in elongated slots 26 which extend upwardly and rearwardly, as is best illustrated in Figure 4.

Referring now to Figure '3 in particular, it will be seen that the star wheel 22 is actually in the form of a pair of star wheel sections .28.. Each of the star wheel sections 28 includes a hub 30 carried by the shaft 24. Projecting rearwardly from the hub 33in spaced relation is a plurality of radiating fingers .32. It is to 'be understood that the fingers ;of the two .star wheel sections 28 are to be arranged in pairs. In fact, the two star wheel sections 28 are preferably integrally formed with their hubs 36 being integral.

Positioned forwardly .of the star wheel 22 is a trigger which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 34. The trigger 34 .is sinusoidal in outline and has its upperend provided with outer :pin portions 36 which are suitably journaled in the side .plates 18. Disposed immediately :below [the-pin portions 36 is an arcuate part 38 which has a curvature substantially equal to the length of the :fingers Formed integral with thearcuate part 38, is another arcuate part 40. The trigger 34 also includes .a finger engageablewportion 42 which projects downwardly below the ifiring mechanism housing 16 and is positioned within'za suitable :trigger guard 44 carried b the housing 116..

Carried by theibarrel i2 ;is stop meansin the form of a notch 46 formed in the forward .end :thereof. The notch 46 is intended to ;have received therein forward portions of a plurality of projectiles, such as the projectile 48 which ,is best illustrated in Figure 7. The projectile 48 includes -.an enlarged :ball :rnember 59 which is Preferably formed of rubber or the like. The ball member 56 is provided .with a ci cumferential groove 52, as is best illustrated in Figure :8, which has tied therein anintermediate portion 20f a rubber band element54. The rubber band element 54 may {be :of a continuous length or it may be formed in sections and tied together-by a suitable knot. 56. When it is desiredto :utilize ;the:toy .gun it), the rubber band portion 5,4 .of a plurality o :the projectiles :48 are engaged in {the notch 46;. The i ividual largeportions or balls Stlz'flr en ag d ehind @fiiQQQIlt'IEB-i'lIS :of fingers 32, as is best illustrated in Figure 4. The projectiles 43 are loaded by continuously placing the rubber balls 59 v behind the fingers 32 and rotating the star wheel 22 in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in Figure 4. When the repeating gun Ill) has been loaded, the projectiles 48 may be individually fired through the use of the trigger 34.

Although the shaft 24 of the star wheel assembly 22 is mounted in an elongated slot, it is retained in the forward portion of the slot by the projectiles 48. This retains a pair of the fingers 32 in engagement with the upper edge of the trigger .34, as is best illustrated in Figure 4, to prevent releasing of the projectiles 48. When it is-desired to fire one of the projectiles 48, the trigger 34 is moved 'rearw'ardly, with the result that the arcuate part 41 engages an adjacent pair of ithe' fingers 32 and urges the star Wheel 22 rearwardly and Upwardly in the notches 26. This results in the fingers engaging the upper edge of the tri ger 34 moving out of engagement therewith and passing thereby so as to permit a partial rotation of the star wheel 22 and the resultant releasing of one of the projectiles 48. After the projec tile 48 has been released, further rotation of the star wheel 22 is prevented by engagement of the fingers 32 which have just been released from engagement with the trigger 34 into engagement with the arcuate part 33 thereof. When the trigger 34 is released, the next finger or fingers 32 will engage the upper edge thereof to permit only partial rotation of the star wheel 22 thus permitting shaft 24 to travel to the forward position of the elongated slots 26 and the releasing of one missile or projectile only. When the trigger 34 is again actuatcd, another one of the projectiles 48 will be released. This is repeated until all the projectiles 48 have been released.

It is noted that although a plurality of projectiles 48 are loaded into the repeating gun at one time, the projectiles 2-3 have the same position immediately prior to their firing or releasing so that effective releasing or firing force in each of the projectiles 48 is the same irrespective of the sequence of firing.

Carried by a forward portion of the barrel 12 is an endless sleeve or strap 57. The strap 57 passes around the barrel 1.2 and around a support member 58. Carried by the sleeve 57 and engaging partially in the support member 58 is a setscrew 59.

When it is desired to utilize the support member 58, the setscrew 59 is partially released and the support member 58 rotated to a position overlying the barrel 12, as is best illustrated in Figure 1. The setscrew 59 is then again tightened so that the sleeve 57 may clamp the support member 58 against the barrel 12.

The support member 58 is provided with a longitudinal bore 60 for the reception of a shaft-like projectile 61. The projectile 61 may be provided at the forward end thereof with a suction cup 62.

In order that a rubber band projector 63 may be suitably loaded into the my gun for firing the projectile 61, the forward edge of the support member 58 is provided with a notch 64 in which the forward portion of the rubber band projector 63 is positioned. The rear portion of the rubber, band projector 63 ,is engaged over one pair of fingers 32 of the star wheel 22. The rear end of the projectile 61 is notched and engages that portion of the rubber band projector 63 disposed between the adjacent fingers 32 of the pair of fingers over which the rear portion of the projector 63 is engaged.

Although only one rubber band projector 63 is to be loaded in the toy gun at a time, it may be fired in the same manner as that described above relative to the projectile 48. In order to facilitate the aiming of the projectile 61, the setscrew 59 may be utilized as a front sight. It is to be understood that by sliding the support member 58 longitudinally along the barrel 12, the effective tension placed upon the projector 63 may be varied so as to vary the firing force of the toy gun 10.

assesses i From the foregoing, the construction and operation of the device will be readily understood and further explanation is believed to be unnecessary. However, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the appended claims.

What claimed as new is as follows:

l. In a repeating toy gun of the type including a barrel, a stock secured to said barrel, an improved firing mechanism, said firing mechanism comprising a housing carried by said stock, a star wheel projectile retainer,

. slots in said housing, a transverse pin slidably mounted in said slots and extending transversely of said housing, said star wheel including a plurality of fingers and being mounted on said pin for pivotal movement, a trigger, a transverse shaft supported by said housingadjacent said star wheel, said trigger having an upper, end receiving said shaft and pivotally mounting said trigger,.said upper end of said trigger being normally engaged with one of said star wheel fingers to prevent rotation of said star wheel, said trigger including an intermediate cam surface aligned with and engageable with another of said star wheel fingers to shift said pin in said slots whereby said star wheel will move away from said shaft and said trigger upper end to a released position.

2. In a repeating toy gun of the type including a bar el, a stock secured to said barrel, an improved firing mechanism, said firing mechanism comprising a housing carried by said stock, a star wheel projectile retainer, slots in said housing, a transverse pin slidably mounted in said slots and extending transversely of said housing, said star wheel including a plurality of fingersand being mounted on said pin for pivotal movementya trigger, a transverse shaft supported by said housing adjacent said star wheel, said trigger having an upper end receiving said shaft and pivotally mounting said trigger, said upper end of said trigger being normally engaged with one of said star wheel fingers to prevent rotation of said star wheel, said trigger including an intermediate cam surface aligned with and engageable with another of said star wheel fingers to shift said pin in said slots whereby said star wheel will move away from said shaft and said trigger upper end to a released position, said trigger including a projecting part intermediate said cam portion and said upper end for engaging said star wheel in said shifted position whereby rotation of the star wheel is limited to the angle between adjacent ones of said fingers.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 93,908 Robinson Aug. 17, 1869 1,626,892 Tidwell May 3, 1927 1,646,122 Tidwell Oct. 18, 1927 1,724,708 Harris Aug. 13, 1929 2,334,332 Johnson Nov. 16, 1943 2,640,699 Garbo June 2, 1953 2,680,434 Lodahl June 8, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 142,092 Australia July 9. 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US93908 *Aug 17, 1869 Charles robinson
US1626892 *Dec 16, 1926May 3, 1927Tidwell William AToy gun
US1646122 *Apr 7, 1927Oct 18, 1927Tidwell William AMissile for toy guns
US1724708 *Jan 25, 1927Aug 13, 1929Harris James CToy gun
US2334332 *Apr 14, 1941Nov 16, 1943Johnson Clarence SRepeating toy gun
US2640699 *Aug 28, 1947Jun 2, 1953Garbo Paul WDisklike plaything
US2680434 *Mar 31, 1952Jun 8, 1954Nels LodahlToy gun
AU142092B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2917037 *Apr 19, 1957Dec 15, 1959Henderson Ralph LRepeating rubber band gun
US5579749 *Mar 22, 1995Dec 3, 1996Wilkinson; William T.Launcher for toy missiles
US6729969 *Mar 13, 2002May 4, 2004Dw Enterprises, LlcGolfing aid
US7640922Mar 8, 2007Jan 5, 2010Thomas SiebelinkFoam dart gun
US8091539Nov 18, 2009Jan 10, 2012Thomas SiebelinkFoam dart gun
US20130014735 *Jul 15, 2011Jan 17, 2013Mathew Peter MowbrayProjectile firing toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/19, 473/569, 273/317, 124/35.1
International ClassificationF41B7/00, F41B7/02
Cooperative ClassificationF41B7/025
European ClassificationF41B7/02B