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Publication numberUS2825796 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1958
Filing dateSep 8, 1955
Priority dateSep 8, 1955
Publication numberUS 2825796 A, US 2825796A, US-A-2825796, US2825796 A, US2825796A
InventorsDwight I Lammon
Original AssigneeDwight I Lammon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Illuminated fence
US 2825796 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' March 4 1958 D. 1. LANE/ION ILLUMINATED FENCE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. s,- 1955 INVEHT'OR. I. MNMa/v March 4, 1958 b. 1. LANMON I 2,825,796

ILLUMINATED FENCE Filed Sept. 8, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 lNl/ENTOR DWIGHT I. LANMUN M Q/Agf MW 14 7' TORNE V5.

United States This invention relates to means for illuminating a fence inclosure and more particularly to a means for installing electrical lamps in fence posts and the running of electrical lead lines thereto.

The lighting of fences and the vicinity adjacent thereto is old and in many instances such lighting is not only desirable but necessary. The method herebefore has been to mount a lamp on top of the post, but such outside lamps are subject to the weather, breakage, and are unsightly.

Therefore, one of the principal objects of my invention is to provide a fence post wherein the illuminating means is housed inside the post.

A further object of this invention is to provide a fence structure and post that facilitates the running and housing of the electrical lead lines to the internally illuminated fence posts.

Still further objects of my invention are to provide an illuminated fencing that is economical in manufacture, durable in use, and refined in appearance.

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

My invention consists in the construction, arrangements, and combination, of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, specifically pointed out in my claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is an inside view of my lightable fence structure,

Fig. 2 is an enlarged side sectional view of the top of one of my posts and the fence railing showing the mithod of passing electrical lead wires from one to the ot er,

Fig. 3 is an enlargedperspective view of the element for securing the top fence pipe to a post and with a section cut away to more fully illustrate its construction,

Fig. 4 is an enlarged top plan sectional view of one corner of my fence,

Fig. 5 is a side view of the upper portion of my fence adjacent an opening such as a gate, and

Fig. 6 is an exploded view of the elements that go to make up the illuminating phase of one of my fence posts.

My fence may be used to completely enclose an area, or it can be placed across a back yard, the side of the yard, in front of a yard, or it may extend from a building 19 or like. Wire mesh fences often are of sections, with the sections secured together by suitable means. The type of wire mesh and its specific structure is of no particular significance to this invention inasmuch as my invention is confined to the structure of the posts, and the hollow horizontal pipe at the top of the fence or link mesh. 11. In general the lamp area of each post follows a common pattern. I have used the numeral 12 to designate the lower portion of a post and the numeral 13 to designate the upper portion of a post. Both of these two portions are tubular as shown in Fig. 6. The numeral 14 designates a tubular section having a slot opening 15 atent O Patented Mar. 4, 1958 2 extending its entire longitudinal length. This member 14 may be formed from a sheet of metal bent to arcuate form and is of the same diameter as the post portions 12 and 13. In each end of the member 14 is a tubular collar 16 and 17, respectively. These tubular collars may be secured in place by any suitable means such as welding and they protrude beyond the ends of the member 14 as shown in Fig. 6. When the post is assembled, the tubular collar 16 extends into the post part 12 and the tubular collar 17 extends into the post part 13. These post parts may be secured by any suitable means, but for quick assembly or disassembly I recommend bolts or screws 18. Such bolts or screws may also be used to hold the arcuate frame 19 over the slot opening 15, by also passing through the bottom and top area respectively of the frame. If desired the hole or holes through which the bolts pass through the frame may be in the form of a slot 20. This frame 19 holds back of it an arcuate lens or glass 21, thus detachably sealing the opening 15. Inside the member 14 and adjacent the opening 15 I provide any suitable incandescent light bulb 22, detachably held in an ordinary light socket 23, as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 5. The lamp used may be of the incandescent or fluorescent type. Each of the posts used may be of the same general construction this far described. The wire fence sections may be secured to the posts by any means such as side standards 24 and brackets 25 as shown in Fig. 1. However, the securing of the top fence pipe and its construction requires different treatment inasmuch as I use the same to carry and house the electrical circuit leading into the various posts. 7

Embracing each corner post I secure a collar 26 having two spaced apart ears 27. The numeral 28 designates a cup adapted to embrace the end of a top fence tube pipe 29. The numeral 30 designates a bar 30 projecting from the rear of the cup and adapted to extend between two ears 27 of a collar 26 as shown in Fig. 5. A bolt 31 detachably extends through the bar 39 and cars 27 rigidly securing the cup to the post. With such a cup supporting means at each end of a top horizontal fence pipe 29, such pipe will be successfully supported. With the bar 30 extending rearwardly and downwardly, the top of a post need not be much higher than that of the pipe ,29 as shown in Fig. 2. Ordinarily there will be only one hole in a cup 29 to receive a flexible conduit 32. However, when a postcarries the electric circuit beyond its lamp, such as theleft corner post of Fig. 1, two holes in one of the cups is necessary in order to carry the second flexible conduit 33,,from one cup to the other cup. The numeral 34 designates a cap on the top of the corner or end posts. The intermediate posts 35 are similar to the other posts except they have a different top structure and they terminate just below the top fence pipe 29. These posts 35 have a fiat top inverted cup cap 36. On the top of this cap 36, l secure a horizontal Z 37. The numeral 38 designates an inverted U-bracket having its two ends secured to the top and bottom respectively of the Z member 37 as shown in Fig. 3. This bracket 38 is adapted to extend around the fence pipe 29 and hold it on top of the post 35, as shown in Fig. 2. If desired a screw or bolt 39 may extend through the bracket to better secure the fence pipe therein. If desired, the top fence pipe may have a detachable section 40 where it is embraced by the bracket. Such structure is shown in Fig. 2 and the section is of cylinder structure having the two spaced apart internal beads 41 near its center, which act as stops to the two ends of the pipes 29 that detachably extend into its two ends. The cap 36 has a hole inside the confines of the Z-member and this is also true of the section 40 to permit electric lead wires to pass from inside of the section 46 to the inside of the post 35. This electrical circuit 45 extends through the conduits 32,

and 33, the fence top rail pipes 29, and sections 40, and into the posts for contact with the lamp sockets therein. When this electrical circuit is in communication with a source of electrical energy, thelamp will be illuminated and the light therefrom will pass through the openings 15, transparent or translucent glass 21, and into the fence area. Thus, by only one electrical switch the fence and its surrounding area may be successfully illuminated. The entire effect is refined and attractive. The electrical means is successfully shielded and housed against the weather. Once installed my'illuminated fence is most durable and requires little upkeep. By being in assemblable sections the fence may be installed to accommodate different sized areas.

Some changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of my illuminated fence without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my intention to cover by my claims, any modified forms of structure or use of mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

I claim:

- 1. In an illuminated fence, a hollow post having an opening in the side wall thereof spaced from its ends, a light passing member over said opening, an electric lamp inside said post, a horizontal tubular fence rail, a cup enclosing an end of said rail and having a hole in its side wall, a bar on the back of said cup, a means on said post securing said bar to said post, a means on the top of said post for closing itstop, a flexible conduit communicating with the inside of said post and the hole in said cup, and electrical conductors residing in said rail, said conduit, and said post and in electrical connection with said lamp.

2. In an illuminated fence, a hollow post having an opening in the side wall thereof spaced from its ends,

a light passing member over said opening, an electric lamp inside said post, a horizontaltubular fence rail, a cup enclosing an end of said rail and having a hole in its side wall, a bar on the back of said cup, a means on said post detachably securing said bar to said post, a means on the top of said post for closing its top, a flexible conduit communicating with the inside of said post and the hole in said cup, and electrical conductors residing in said rail, said conduit, and said post and in electrical connection with said lamp.

3. In an illuminated fence, a hollow post having an opening in the side wall thereof spaced from its ends, a light passing member over said opening, an electric lamp inside said post, a horizontal tubular fence rail associated with said post, an inverted cap on the top of said post, a horizontal Z-member on the top of said cap, a bracket band operatively secured at its two ends to said post and extending around said rail; said rail having a hole and said cap having a hole confined in the area of said Z-member, and electrical conductors in said rail and extending through its hole, the hole in said cap, and into said post and electrically connected to said lamp.

4. In an illuminated fence post, a lower tubular section, an upper tubular section, an intermediate tubular section having an opening, a tubular collar extending from the lower end of said intermediate section into the top of said lower tubular section, a tubular section, a tubular collar extending from the upper end of said intermediate tubular section into the bottom of said upper tubular section, an arcuate frame member embracing the opening in said intermediate section, a light passing shield back of said frame; said intermediate section adapted to hold an electric lamp, and a means on said post for connecting a. fence railing thereto.

5. In an illuminated fence post, a lower tubular section, an upper tubular section, an intermediate tubular section having an opening, a tubular collar'extending from the lower end of said intermediate section into the top of said lower tubular section, a tubular collar extending from the upper end of said intermediate tubular section into the bottom of said upper tubular section, an arcuate frame member detachably embracing the opening in said intermediate section, a light passing shield back of said frame; said intermediate section adapted to hold an electric lamp, and a means on said post for connecting a fence railing thereto.

6. In an illuminated fence post, a lower tubular section, an upper tubular section, an intermediate tubular section having an opening, a tubular collar extending from the lower end of said intermediate section into the top of said lower tubular section, a means for detachably securing said tubular collar to said lower tubular member, a tubular collar extending from the upper end of said intermediate tubular section into the bottom of said upper tubular section, a means for detachably securing said second tubular collar to said upper tubular memher, an arcuate frame member embracing the opening in said intermediate section, a light passing shield back of said frame; said intermediate section adapted to hold an electric lamp, and a means on said post for connecting a fence railing thereto.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Longberg Aug 16, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1794467 *Oct 2, 1928Mar 3, 1931Charles L FeldmanIlluminated fence
US1798548 *Apr 1, 1929Mar 31, 1931Sanford M MccurdyAdjustable road guard
US2156617 *Dec 23, 1938May 2, 1939Calissi Paul CLamp
US2223222 *Jul 30, 1940Nov 26, 1940Seco Toys IncToy fence
US2310593 *Nov 25, 1941Feb 9, 1943Leonard E RozyckiHandrail
US2479500 *Aug 26, 1946Aug 16, 1949Harry E LongbergIlluminating means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3004145 *Jan 13, 1959Oct 10, 1961Arnold Kroes Jacob MeeuwesAnti-blinding screen with built-in lamp means for the illumination of roads with separate tracks
US3067325 *Dec 31, 1959Dec 4, 1962Kennedy James WStreet and sidewalk lighting means
US3379413 *Sep 22, 1965Apr 23, 1968Sprey Architectural Metals LtdBalustrades
US4637186 *Mar 27, 1985Jan 20, 1987Heras Holding, B.V.Fence pole
US5504342 *Sep 8, 1994Apr 2, 1996Jaynes; Curtis B.Inline handrail blacklight
US5641241 *Jul 19, 1995Jun 24, 1997Rushing; Hollis B.Lighted anti-glare paddle system
US5887856 *Jul 3, 1997Mar 30, 1999Everly, Ii; Robert J.Illuminated fence system
US6789786 *Nov 6, 2000Sep 14, 2004Michael SchatzbergTensioned fence with self-closing, self-latching gate
US7303078 *May 30, 2003Dec 4, 2007Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Screen panel
US7516850Sep 27, 2007Apr 14, 2009Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Screen panel
US8490939 *Apr 27, 2005Jul 23, 2013Res-Q-Jack, Inc.Method and apparatus for buttress stabilization and integrated illumination means
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/152, 256/33, 256/32, 256/1, 362/431
International ClassificationF21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00
European ClassificationF21V33/00