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Publication numberUS2826056 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1958
Filing dateAug 28, 1953
Priority dateAug 28, 1953
Also published asDE1149324B
Publication numberUS 2826056 A, US 2826056A, US-A-2826056, US2826056 A, US2826056A
InventorsBruckman William C
Original AssigneeEasy Washing Machine Company L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drive for automatic washer
US 2826056 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. c. BRUCKMAN 2,826,056 DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC ASHE March 11, 19:58

7 SheetS -Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 28, 1955 FIG-Z m m M 0 WNW/m m 17% w. R RTWW MM A U M w. c. BRUCKMAN 2,826,056 DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC WASHER March v11, 1958 INVENTOR. -W/LL/AM CBRUC/(MA/V' B f HTTORNE YS 'T Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 28, 1953 Marchll, 1958 w. c. 'BRUCKMAN 2,826,056

DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC WASHER Filed Aug. 28, 1953 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. WILLIAM CJBRUCKMHN BY W 4* 71.4

H T TORNE Y5 March 11,1958 w. c. BRUCKMAN I 2,826,056

DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC WASHER Filed Aug. 28, 1953 T SheetS-Sheer, 4

INVENTOR. WI hLIHM- CZ BRUCKMHN HTTOENEYS March 11, 1958 w. c. BRUCKMAN 2,826,056

DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC WASHER Filed Aug. 28, 1955 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 III/II I 'YIIIIIIIIIII IN V EN TOR. c. swarm/v H T TOR/YE Y5 March 11, 1958' w. c. BRUCKMAN 2,326,056

DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC WASHER v Fiig i Aug. 28. 1953 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIG-6 EN TOR.

WILLIAM C. BRUCKMAN BY TWfW ATTORNEYS March 11, 1958 w. c. BRUCKMAN 2,826,056

DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC WASHER Filed Aug. 28, 1953 7 Sheets-:Sheet 7 INVENTOR.

wemmm c. EfiUCKM/q HTTORNEY5 United States Patent DRIVE FOR AUTOMATIC WASHER William C. Bruckman, Newton, Iowa, assignor, by mesne assignments, to The Easy Washing Machine Company, Limited, a corporation of Toronto, Canada Application August 28, 1953, Serial No. 377,153

9 Claims. (Cl. 68-23) This invention relates to a drive arrangement for an automatic washer of the type in which clothes are washed by an oscillating action and are subsequently damp-dried by a spinning action. A washer of this general nature is disclosed in the issued Clayton F. Emmert and William H. Stouder U. S. Patent No. 2,534,194, and also in my co-pending application, Serial No. 376,643, filed August 26, 1953, and entitled Tub Structure.

In a washer of the nature referred to above, there is a tub having an agitator therein, and the tub, during a washing cycle, is held stationary while the agitator is oscillated to and fro, thereby to agitate the clothes and to force water and suds through the clothes to remove dirt therefrom. At the end of a Washing cycle the tub is rotated at a fairly high speed, on the order of 750 to 1000 R. P. M., or even higher, and during this spinning of the tub the free water in the tub is centrifuged therefrom and most of the water in the clothes is centrifuged therefrom and passes from the tub. At the end of a spinning cycle the clothes are in a dampened condition suitable for rapid drying by any other suitable means.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that such a washer embodies essentially two drives; one to the agitator which is a fairly slow speed oscillating drive; and another to the tub which is a fairly high speed rotary drive. The economical way of powering these drives is by a single motor with suitable clutch means being provided for making the drives selectively efiective.

Having the foregoing in mind, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a washing machine of the nature referred to in which a minimum complexity obtains in connection with the drive arrangement.

A particular object of this invention is the provision of a washer of the nature referred to in which electrically operated clutches and the like for making the individual drives effective are eliminated.

Another particular object is the provision of a drive arrangement for a washing machine of the nature referred to in which a reversible drive motor is employed, with one drive being effective in one direction of rotation of the motor and another drive being effective in the opposite direction of rotation of the motor.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a drive arrangement for a washing machine of the nature referred to which is extremely strong and rugged in construction whereby the washer will remain in service for a long period of time without requiring any maintenance.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a drive arrangement for a washer of the nature referred to in which the agitator in the tub oscillates during the washing cycle and is then locked to It is, accordingly, a still further object of this inven-- tion to arrange a drive for a washing machine which is tiltable in the frame of the machine with the tub, but wherein no unbalancing of the tub takes place on account of the drive mechanism.

Still another object is the provision of a drive for the tub of a washing machine of the nature referred to so mounted and connected'with the tub as to be tiltable in the frame of the machine with the tub, but exhibiting the characteristic of substantially complete static balance relative to the axis of the tub so as not to interfere with the automatic counterbalance action that takes place in the tub during a spinning cycle thereof.

These and other objects and advantages of this in- Figure 3 is a transverse section indicated by line 3-3 on Figure 2 looking up from the bottom and showing the drive train leading from the electric drive motor to the tub and the agitator of the machine;

Figure 4 is a sectional view indicated by line 4-4 on Figure 3 showing the drive train in the transmission housing of the machine in vertical section;

-Figure 5 is a fragmentary sectional view indicated by line 5-5 on Figure 3 showing an eccentric support for a portion of the drive train;

Figure 6 is an enlarged vertical sectional view showing more in detail the clutch mechanisms for connecting the drive motor with the agitator or for connecting the drive motor with the tub while connecting the agitator with the tub;

Figure 7 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the manner in which the drive belt that is driven by the electric motor drivingly engages a drive ring for driving the tub;

Figure 8 is a perspective sectional view showing a shifter arm which automatically shifts the agitator clutch when the electric drive motor is reversed;

Figure'9 is a perspective view showing the tub drive A ring that is driven by the belt from the electric motor and a cam ring that is connected for rotation with the drive ring;

Figure 10 is a perspective view showing a clutch member that is associated with the oscillating pinion for driving the agitator and the sleeve which the clutch member engages when the agitator is to be clutched to the tub;

Figure 11 is another perspective view showing the clutch member of Figure 10 from the underside thereof;

and

Figure 12 is a sectional view showing the manner in 1 which the clutch member is formed with recesses for engaging the clutch teeth on the oscillating pinion and sleeve in its two positions of adjustment.

Patented Mar. 11", 1958 Referring to the drawings somewhat more in detail, reference to Figures 1 and 2 will reveal that the washing machine structure comprises a base portion having diagonally inwardly extending members 12 which are connected adjacent the center of base 10 with a ring 14. Also supported in the center of base 10 is a member 16 carrying on its upper side a rubber-like ball retainer 18 in which is a large metallic ball 20 serving as a support for the tub and drive mechanism of the machine, as will be explained more in detail hereinafter.

Upstanding from base 10, along the sides thereof, are the angles 22 which are connected at their upper ends with a splash shield 24 which also serves as a sump for receiving water discharged from the tub of the machine.

Supported on and extending upwardly from about base 10, in surrounding relation to splash shield 24, is cabinet 26 having a top portion 28. The top wall of the cabinet is centrally apertured and is provided with a lid structure (not shown) pivoted thereon for closing the aperture.

The upper end of splash shield 24 is preferably provided with an annular grommet 34 for sealingly engaging the underside of top portion 28 of the cabinet.

Located within splash shield 24, substantially co-axially therewith and having substantial clearance therefrom, is a tub structure 36 consisting of an inner tub part 38, an outer annular balancing ring part 40, and a crown ring 42 mounted on the upper edge of tub 38 and having a dependent marginal portion surrounding the tub that carries balancing ring 40. The upper portion of crown ring 42 extends inwardly and upwardly from the top of the tub and defines an aperture 44 through which clothes are placed in the tub or removed therefrom.

Between the tub and crown ring there is provided a plurality of spaces 46 through which water is centrifuged from the tub during a spinning cycle thereof. This water passes downwardly between the crown ring and the outer part of the tub into balancing ring 40, and a certain amount of the water is retained within the balancing ring for automatically counterbalancing the tub structure during a spin cycle, as has been explained more fully in my co-pending application, Serial No. 376,643, entitled Tub Structure.

The bottom portion of tub 38, as will be seen in Figures 2 and 6, is connected with a short cylindrical hub member 48 and connected to the top of member 48, and upstanding within the tub on the axis thereof, is a hollow column 50. Hollow column 50 rotatably receives the agitator drive shaft 52 splined at its upper end at 54 to agitator 56 which extends downwardly within the tub to an enlarged base portion 58, and between which base portion and the elongated vertical portion of the agitator is arranged a plurality of vanes 60.

The bottom portion of tub 38 has an inverted frusto conical element 62 dependent therefrom that is connected with the lower end of cylindrical member 48, and a rubber-like seal 64 is provided that abuts the bottom of frusto conical element 62 and also extends under the lower end of member 48 where it is clamped in position by a ring 66. A second seal is provided which takes the form of an accordian pleated rubber-like member 68 whose lower end is secured about the periphery of an upstanding flange 70 in the bottom wall of splash shield 24 and whose upper end is connected with a ring 72 that bears on the top of ring 66 previously referred to.

Cylindrical member 48 is rotatable on the upper end of an elongated sleeve 74 surrounding shaft 52 and extending downwardly with the said shaft into the transmission housing of the drive.

Turning now to the transmission housing of the drive and the associated parts, the transmission housing comprises an upper portion 80 having an upstanding part 82 surrounding shaft 52 and the lower end of sleeve 74. The transmission housing also comprises a lower cover portion or sump 84 which rotatably receives the lower end of .4 shaft 52 and which shaft is supported on a disc 86 (Fig. 4) resting on a ball 88 that engages the upper end of a screw 90 threaded into a boss 92 in cover 84 and having secured to its lower end a shallow cup 94 that rests on ball 20 previously referred to. At this point it will be seen that ball 28 provides the Support for the transmission housing and also for shaft 52.

Sleeve 74, at the upper end of the upstanding portion 82 of transmission housing part 80, fits within the inner race of an antifriction bearing 96, the outer race of which fits closely within upstanding portion 82. A snap ring 98, in a groove in sleeve 74, engages the upper face of the inner race of the hearing.

The lower end of sleeve 74 similarly fits within the inner race of an antifriction bearing 100, the outer race of which is received in the lower part of upstanding portion 82. A snap ring 182, in a groove in sleeve 74, engages the bottom face of the inner race of the bearing 10!). A sleeve 104 within upstanding portion 82 extends between the outer races of bearings 96 and 100, maintaining them in fixed spaced relation, and a dog point screw 106 in upstanding portion 82 fixes sleeve 104 therein, thereby positively to locate bearings 96 and and therethrough to locate sleeve 74. As will be seen in Figure 6, cylindrical member 48 rests on a shoulder provided on elongated sleeve 74, and, therefore, the locating of bearings 96 and 100 in the manner described also serves to locate the tub structure within the machine.

The upper portion 80 of the transmission housing has an extension 110 on one side thereof having a vertical boss 112 at the end that rotatably receives an electric motor supporting bracket 114, to which is connected the electric motor 116.

As will be seen in Figures 1 and 2, bracket 114 consists of two leg parts 118 extending across the top of motor 116 and to which the said motor is bolted. One of the leg parts has a bracket 120 (Fig. 3) thereon, to which is connected a spring 122 which urges the motor in a direction to maintain the belt driven thereby under tension at all times.

The motor 116 has a pulley 124 at its upper end that drives a V-belt 126 and this V-belt passes about a large pulley 128 arranged on the opposite side of the axis of the tub structure from motor 116.

Pulley 128 is mounted on the upper end of a shaft 139 extending down through top portion 80 of the transmission housing and into the bottom portion 84 thereof, and Within the transmission housing the shaft has drivingly mounted thereon pinion 132 (Figs. 3 and 4).

Pinion 132 meshes with gear 134 in the transmission housing, and which gear has a central bushing 136 rotatable on the pivot post 138 carried by top portion 80 of the transmission housing. Pivot post 138 is preferably of eccentric construction to permit adjustment of gear 134 laterally of its axis.

Gear 134 has an eccentric drive pin 140 to which is connected one end of a pitman or drag link 142 leading to pivot point 144 on a gear sector 146 rotatably supported on eccentric pin 148 (see also Fig. 5).

Gear sector 146 meshes with pinion 1S0 rotatably supported on shaft 52 adjacent the bottom thereof and advantageously located axially of the shaft by the snap rings 152.

Keyed to shaft 52, and slidable thereon between the upper surface of pinion 150 and the lower end of sleeve 74, is a clutch member 154.

This clutch member and the adjacent portions of sleeve 74 and pinion 150 are illustrated in detail in Figures 10, 11 and 12. In these figures it will be noted that the upper face of pinion 150 comprises the axially extending slightly tapered drive lugs 156 adapted for being received in the corresponding tapered drive recesses 158 extending inwardly from the lower side of clutch member 154. Similarly, the lower end of sleeve 74 has extending therefrom the drive lugs or teeth 160 substantially axial on one side and having a bevelled corner 162 on the other side that is adapted for being received in the drive recesses 164 extending inwardly from the top face of clutch member 154. Each drive recess 164 has an inclined approach 166 which, together with the bevels 162 on the lugs or teeth 160, permits full engagement of the clutch member with the said teeth even when the speed of relative rotation between sleeve 74 and clutch member 154 is relatively high.

Clutch member 154 has an annular groove 168 engaged by the shift fork 170 (Figs. 2 and 3) pivoted on shaft 172 in top portion 80 of the transmission housing. Shift fork 170 has a depending finger 174, the lower end of which engages the diagonal slot 176 (Figs. 3 and 8) in the end of arm 178. It will be evident that movement of the arm in one direction will bring about shifting of clutch member 154 into engagement with Pinion 150, whereas movement of the arm in the opposite direction will bring about shifting of clutch member 154 into engagement with the lower end of sleeve 74.

For accomplishing the shifting of arm 178, it has connected therewith a spring clip 180 (Figs. 4 and 8) that bears on a friction plate 182 engaging the lower peripheral portion of gear 134. The said arm engages the upper face of peripheral portion of gear 134, and thus for one direction of rotation for one gear the arm will be moved in one direction, and for the other direction of rotation of the other gear the arm will be moved in the other direction.

Ann 178 advantageously extends along the upper face of gear 134 and is pivotally supported on top portion 80 of the transmision housing co-axially with gear 134. In order to prevent arm 178 from binding between gear 134 and top portion 80 of the transmission housing the said housing comprises a dependent boss 184 that engages the periphery of the bushing 136 in gear 134. This boss has an opening at 186 through which the arm 178 extends.

It will be evident that whenever motor 116 is operating, pinion 150 will be driven in oscillation, and that, for one direction of rotation of the motor, arm 178 will be moved in a direction to shift clutch member 154 into position to connect agitator shaft 52 with oscillating pinion 150 so that the agitator will be oscillated; whereas, when the electric motor is running in the opposite direction, arm 178 will be moved to shift clutch member 154 out of engagement with the oscillating pinion and into position with sleeve 74 so that the agitator is locked to the tub. At this time the oscillating pinion is merely oscillating idly.

A feature of this invention and the drive to the agitator is the movement of the agitator through 220, which is a considerably greater amount than is usually encountered and contributes greatly to the washing efficiency of the machine.

Turning now to the drive mechanism for driving the tub in rotation, this structure will best be seen in Figures 2, 4 and 6 wherein it will be observed that there is a key 190 fixed in sleeve 74, which key also engages cylindrical hub member 48 that is rigid with the tub, ring 66, and the upper end of a brake and drive plate 192 that is reciprocably mounted on sleeve 74 and urged downwardly by compression spring 194.

The outer periphery of brake and drive plate 192 has a flat annular surface at 196 adapted for engagement with the peripheral fiat flange 200 of a pan-shaped housing 202. A plurality of spaced friction pads 198 are mounted on flange 200.

Housing member 202 has its bottom wall resting on top of upwardly projecting portion 82 of the transmission housing and secured thereto by screws 204. Housing member 202 is also connected as by the rivets 206 with a platform structure 208 extending transversely of the machine, as will best be seen in Figures 1 and 2 and which will be referred to more in detail hereinafter.

Located within housing member 202 is a drive ring 210 rotatable on a bushing 212 surrounding sleeve 74. Drive ring 210 has a cylindrical outer surface 214 adapted for engagement by the back of belt 126 which contacts the drive ring through the elongated aperture 216 (Figs. 6 and 7) in the side wall of the housing member.

Mounted on the drive ring 210 is a cam ring 218, shown in detail in Figure 9. Cam ring 218 comprises three spaced cam portions 220 having vertical abutments 222 and 224 at their opposite ends. The spaces between the abutments are availed of for receiving the screws 226 that connect the cam ring with the drive ring. Each cam portion 220 comprises a helical part rising upwardly from abutment 222 toward abutment 224 and terminating in a substantially horizontal part 228 adjacent abutment 224.

Engaging the several cam portions 220 are the rollers 230 (Figs. 6 and 7) mounted on shafts 232 that project radially from the clutch member 234 rotatably and reciprocably mounted about bushing 212. The upper end of clutch member 234 has a flat annular surface 236, and immediately above surface 236 on the clutch member is a fiat annular surface 238 on the brake and drive plate 192, to which is attached the friction facing 240.

At this point it will be seen that when the brake and drive plate is in its Figure 6 position, wherein the peripheral portion of the drive plate is bearing on the peripheral portion of the housing member 202, the tub structure will be held stationary relative to the housing member, the platform 208, and the transmission housing. However, upward movement of clutch member 234 to bring surface 236 thereof into pressure engagement with the friction facing 240 will cause the brake and drive plate 192 to move upwardly, thus releasing the brake and drive plate from engagement with housing member 202 and, instead, drivingly connecting the brake and drive plate with clutch member 234. At this time the tub structure will be free to rotate relative to housing member 202 and the other stationary parts of the mechanism, such as the platform 208 and the transmision housing.

Referring now to Figure 9, it will be evident that when the drive ring 210 is driven by the electric motor in the direction of the arrow 242, the rollers 230 will remain in engagement with the abutments 222, the clutch member 234 will rotate with the drive ring, and the cam ring will remain in its Figure 6 position. However, upon reversing of the electric motor the drive ring and cam ring will commence to rotate in the direction of arrow 244 in Figure 9, and at the instant of reversal of the electric motor the inertia of the relatively heavy clutch member 234 will cause the rollers 230 to ride up their respective inclines, thereby bringing surface 236 of the clutch member into engagement with friction facing 140. This frictional engagement of the clutch member with the friction facing will bring about still further movement of the rollers up their inclines to the point that they will ride up on the horizontal portions 248 and abut the abutments 244. At this time the brake and drive plate 192 will be lifted away from housing member 202 whereby the tub structure is not braked but is drivingly engaged with clutch member 234 which is being driven in rotation due to its engagement with the abutmcnts 224 of the driven cam ring 218.

The direction of rotation of the drive ring and cam ring, which brings about the clutching of the tub structure to clutch member 234, is brought about by that direction of rotation of the electric motor which will shift clutch member 1.54 into engagement with sleeve 74. Accordingly, it will be evident that when the tub structure is driven by clutch member 234, the agitator will be locked to the tub structure and rotate therewith; whereas, in the opposite direction of rotation of the electric motor, the tub structure will be braked stationarily to the housing member 202 while the agitator is driven with an oscillatory movement.

It will also be evident that due to the speed reduction asaaosc obtained between the output shaft of the electric motorand the oscillating pinion, the speed of the oscillation of the agitator will be relatively low, on the order of 60 strokes per minute, while, on the other hand, there is considerably less speed reduction between the output shaft of the drive motor and the drive ring 210 whereby the tub structure will be driven at a fairly high speed of rotation up to about 1000 or 1100 R. P. M.

Inasmuch as the tub will be heavily loaded at the time the spin cycle commences, there will be some slipping in the drive thereto, and this slipping can take place partly between the drive belt and the drive ring 210 and partly before surface 236 of the clutch member and friction facing 240. This slipping will prevent extreme loading of the drive motor, but is small enough that the tub structure will come up to speed fairly rapidly.

Referring now to the platform 208 (Fig. 1), this member is provided with channels 250 at its opposite ends, and between each end of each channel and the adjacent corner of the base there is connected a snubber arrangement 252 consisting of a U-shaped part 254 connected with the platform and a U-shaped part 256 connected with the base, and with the legs of part .254 fitting within the legs of part 256 and in frictional engagement therewith as by means of suitable friction pads. The tension springs 258 connected between the closed ends of the U-chaped parts 254 and 256 serve to retain the tub structure, platform and transmission pressed downwardly on supporting ball 20 and also tend to hold the assembly upright within the frame of the washer while permitting tilting thereof, as is necessary in order to counterbalance the tub structure during a spin cycle thereof.

it will be noted that the transmission and drive motor are so arranged as to be substantially statically balanced relative to the axis of the tub structure, whereby the tilt: ing of the tub structure during the spin cycle does not cause any unbalancing thereof due to an off-center weight of the transmission and drive motor.

In operation, during a washing operation, the electric motor runs in one direction, thus causing the agitator to oscillate and during which the tub structure is held stationary by being braked to the housing member 202. At the end of a washing operation the drive motor is reversed. and this will bring about clutching of the agitator to the tub structure, releasing of the tub from its braked position, and the connecting of the tub structure to the drive motor to be rotated thereby at fairly high speed. During the spinning operation water is centrifuged from the tub into the balancing ring 40 and will pass therethrough into the splash shield and sump 24, with a portion of the water being retained within the balancing ring 40 for counterbalancing unbalanced loads in the tub. When the tub structure is running below critical speed the tub structure will have a tendency to rotate heavy side out, and at this time the snubbers 252 will prevent any substantial movement laterally of the tub structure. However, aftcr the tub structure has passed through its critical speed it will tend to rotate heavy side in, and this will bring about shifting of the water in balancing ring 40 to the side thereof opposite the unbalanced load in the tub thereby to counterbalance the tub structure. The forces of unbalance at this time are high and will cause the tub to tilt against the action of springs 258 and he snubbers so that substantially perfect balance of the tub structure exists during a spin cycle.

After the spin cylce has been completed, and the drive motor is de-energized, the tub structure will come to a halt and the water in the balancing ring will drain there from into the sump when the cycle is completed.

A feature of the drive arrangement of the present invention, which will best be seen in Figure 3, is the path taken by drive belt 126. It will be noted that this belt wraps around pulley 124 and wraps around pulley 128 on the input shaft 130 of the transmission, while the outer portion or back of the belt engages and wraps partially around drive ring 210. This arrangement of the belt has a first pronounced advantage in that the belt can readily be removed when it becomes worn and replaced by another quite easily and without dismantling the machine. This comes about because the belt lies entirely to one side of the central supporting column extending through the machine, and thus a one-piece molded belt can be employed.

A second advantage that obtains from the described arrangement of the drive belt is that the belt has a substantial amount of wrap around the motor pulley 124 and the transmission input pulley 128, and thus there is a minimum of slipping between the belt and these two pulleys and a maximum transfer of power from the motor to the transmission. This prevents slipping and undue wearing of the belt and underspeed operation when the agitator is being driven. At the same time the drive ring 210, which engages the back of the belt which causes the belt to follow a path that produces the degree of wrap of the belt about pulleys 124 and 128 referred to above, has only a limited arc of contact with the back of the belt and thus some slipping of the belt on the drive ring will occur when the washer goes on its spin cycle. This is, important because the tub is to be accelerated up to a relatively high speed of rotation, 750 R. P. M. or higher, and represents a substantial in r ia, load due to the water and clothes therein. Because of the inertia of the parts that must be brought up to speed during a spin cycle, it is important that there be some slip in the drive thereto. to prevent severe overloading or stalling of the electric drive motor.

The described arrangement of the belt thus provides for minimum slip and maximum transmission of power to the transmission pulley, while providing for a slippable connection between the belt and the high speed drive ring, and at the same time sufficient Wrap of the belt about the drive ring is provided to bring the rotating parts of the machine up to spin speed within a rcasonable'period.

It will be understood that this invention is susceptible to modification in order to adapt it to different usages and conditions, and, accordingly, it is desired to comprehend such modifications within this invention as may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination; a shiftable clutch member, a shifter fork for shifting said clutch, a reversible gear, an arm extending radially across one face of the gear and projecting beyond the periphery of the gear, a diagonal slot in the end of the arm engaging said fork so that movement of the arm circumferentially of the gear in opposite directions will actuate said shifter fork to shift said clutch member, a friction plate engaging the other face of the gear, and spring means interconnecting said arm and said friction plate for pressing said plate against the said other face of the gear.

2. In combination; a shiftable clutch member, a shifter fork for shifting said clutch, a reversible gear, an arm extending radially across one face of the gear and projecting beyond the periphery of the gear a diagonal slot in the end of the arm engaging said fork so that movement of the arm circumferentially of the gear in opposites directions will actuate said shifter fork to shift said clutch member, a friction plate engaging the other face of the gear, and spring means acting between said arm and said friction plate for pressing said plate against the said other face of the gear, said slot being generally elliptical to provide for slow initial movement of the fork and clutch member and rapid final movement thereof.

3. The combination comprising a shiftable clutch member, means for shifting said clutch, a reversible gear, an arm extending radially across one face of the gear and projecting beyond the periphery of the gear, the end of said armapd said shifting means having a pimin-slot connection With one another, the slot being arranged diagonally of the plane of the gear so that the movement of the arm circumferentially of the gear in opposite directions will actuate said shifting means to shift said clutch member, and means maintaining said arm frictionally in engagement with said gear.

4. A washing machine comprising a rotatably mounted tub, an agitator mounted in said tub for oscillation relative thereto, a reversible drive motor, a hollow drive shaft affixed to said tub and extending axially downwardly therefrom, a drive shaft affixed to said agitator and extending coaxially through said hollow drive shaft and below the lower end thereof, a clutch member on the agitator drive shaft, said clutch member being axially shiftable on said agitator drive shaft and secured against rotation relative thereto, a driving clutch member, means driving said driving clutch member in oscillation from said motor, a reversible rotating drive member driven by said drive motor, shifting means for axially shifting the agitator shaft clutch member into and out of engagement with said driving clutch member, means frictionally engaging one face of the rotary drive member and having a pin-in-slot connection with the clutch shifting means, said slot being diagonally arranged relative to the plane of said rotary drive member, whereby rotation of said rotary drive member in one direction causes said gear engaging means to operate said clutch shifting means to engage said agitator shaft clutch member with the driving clutch member, and to disengage the same upon reverse rotation, drive means concentric with said shafts and rotatable in either direction by said motor, said last mentioned drive means having cam means thereon, a rotary cam follower means concentric with said shafts and having roller means engaging said cam means, said cam means having frictional means thereon, said hollow drive shaft having means providing frictional drive means, said frictional drive means engaging a fixed part of said washing machine upon rotation of said concentric drive means in one direction, said cam means and cam follower roller means effecting movement of said frictional drive means out of engagement with the fixed washing machine part and into engagement with the cam follower friction means upon reverse rotation of said motor to drive said hollow drive shaft for spinning said tub to centrifuge water from clothes therein, and means acting between said hollow shaft and said agitator shaft upon such reverse rotation of said motor to spin said agitator with said tub.

5. In combination; a shiftable clutch member, a shifter member for shifting said clutch, a reversible gear, an arm extending radially across one face of the gear and projecting beyond the periphery of the gear, a pin and slot connection between said arm and said shifter member so that movement of the arm circumferentially of the gear in opposite directions will actuate said shifter member to shift said clutch member, and a brake device carried by said arm and frictionally engaging the other face of the gear.

6. In combination; a shiftable clutch member, a shifter fork for shifting said clutch, a reversible gear, an arm extending radially across one face of the gear and projecting beyond the periphery of the gear, one of said arm and shifter fork being provided with a slot form tion and the other being provided with a pin engaging in said slot formation whereby movement of the arm circumferentially of the gear in opposite directions will actuate said shifter fork to shift said clutch member, a friction member engaging the other face of the gear, and spring means carried by the arm pressing said friction member against the said other face of the gear.

7. In a washing machine; a tub, an agitator in the tub, a reversible drive motor, a pinion positively driven in oscillation by said motor, and a drive ring frictionally driven in rotation by said motor, a first clutch for connecting the agitator with and disconnecting the agitator from the pinion, a second clutch for connecting the tub with the drive ring, means frictionally driven by said motor for shifting said first clutch alternately to connecting and disconnecting positions in accordance with the direction of rotation of said motor, and one-way inertia operated roller means for shifting said second clutch to connect said drive ring to said tub upon to tation of said motor in one direction, said second clutch being ineffective to connect said drive ring to said tub upon rotation of said motor in the opposite direction, whereby both of said clutches are responsive to the direction of rotation of said motor alternately to oscillate said agitator and to rotate said tub.

8. A machine as claimed in claim 7 in which said inertia operated roller means is spirally advanced and retracted between positions connecting the tub with the drive ring and releasing the tub from the drive ring.

9. A machine as claimed in claim 7 in which said second clutch comprises a rotatable brake member, and said inertia operated roller means for shifting the second clutch comprises rollers supporting said rotatable brake member from inclined trackways provided on said drive ring, said trackways having stop formations to limit rotational movement of said second clutch.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,047,119 Altorfer Dec. 10, 1912 1,152,377 Altorfer Aug. 31, 1915 2,009,964 Mottlau July 30, 1935 2,161,604 Watts June 6, 1939 2,269,190 Dunham Jan. 6, 1942 2,331,897 Dyer Oct. 19, 1943 2,346,152 Clark Apr. 11, 1944 2,512,847 Conterman June 27, 1950 2,521,159 Geldhof et a1. Sept. 5, 1950

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2921460 *Jul 21, 1958Jan 19, 1960Gen ElectricClothes washing machine having undulatory vane type agitator
US2924086 *Jun 5, 1958Feb 9, 1960Philco CorpDrive mechanism
US2947159 *Nov 18, 1958Aug 2, 1960Enrique FernandezClutching mechanisms for washing machines including an agitator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification68/23.7, 477/7, 477/182, 192/48.9, 192/18.00R
International ClassificationD06F13/00, D06F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F13/02
European ClassificationD06F13/02