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Publication numberUS2826297 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1958
Filing dateJan 20, 1955
Priority dateJan 20, 1955
Publication numberUS 2826297 A, US 2826297A, US-A-2826297, US2826297 A, US2826297A
InventorsJr George N Hein
Original AssigneeBecton Dickinson Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Snake bite kit
US 2826297 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SNAKE BITE KIT Filed Jan. 20, 1955 (fa/ye M 1761', I]: BY

1 WM r IN V EN TOR.

the cup members.

United States Patent SNAKE BITE KIT George N. Hein, (FL, San Carlos, Calif., assignor to Becton,

Dickinson and Company, Rutherford, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application January 20, 1955, Serial No. 483,034

13 Claims. (Cl. 206-632) This invention relates to a structurally and functionally improved kit, by means of which a user may efficiently treat himself and take counter-measures if he is bitten by a snake or a venomous insect, etc.

It is a primary object to provide an assembly of this nature in which the operative surfaces of the main appliances or units will be maintained in a clean and preferably sterilized condition; accessory elements stored within such units being similarly maintained. However, the user will, without difficulty and with the expenditure of only minimum amounts of time, be able to render the several parts of the assembly accessible for use, and despite the fact that he may just have been bitten.

A further object is that of designing a structure in which most of the components can effectively be operated by using only one hand. So employed, necessary incisions may be made Without fear of lancing or slashing one of the larger blood vessels.

Still another object is that of providing a compact assembly which may readily be worn on the belt of the user so as to be instantly accessible; the structure embracing relatively few parts, each individually simple in design and capable of economical manufacture.

With these and other objects in mind, reference is had to the attached sheet of drawings, illustrating practical embodiments of the invention, and in which:

Fig. l is a sectional side view, taken through the completely assembled kit;

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view, taken along the line 22 in the direction of the arrows as indicated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a limb portion and showing a preferred form of tourniquet associated therewith;

Fig. 4 is a similar view of one of the suction cups of the assembly with the adaptor plate applied thereto; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional side view of an alternative assembly.

Referring primarily to Fig. l, the numerals 5 and 6 indicate suction cups formed of suitable rubber, either natural or synthetic, or else of any other proper materials. These cups have their free edge portions disposed in opposed relationship. interposed between these edge portions is a plate 7, preferably of metal, and provided with a rearwardly extending flange 8, which has an outside diameter such that it will snugly engage the inner face of one of Extending from the opposite face of that plate is a nozzle 9. That nozzle extends into the bore of the second cup and may engage surfaces of appliances within the latter to assist in retaining the same against shifting.

Within the bore of cup 6, a pair of vials may be disposed. Each of these conveniently includes a body 10 of glass, which has one of its ends closed. The opposite end, in each instance, is sealed by a suitable stopper 11. These vials may contain suitable materials. For example, a liquid antiseptic may be disposed within the body of one of the same, while the second receives a mass of sterilized cotton, swabs, or similar materials. The length 2,826,297 Patented Mar. 11, 1958 2 of the vials should be slightly less than the distance existing between the inner face of plate 7 and the opposed face of the cup base portion, even when the latter is distorted in an inward direction, as shown in Fig. 1.

To properly encase the cups and to also force their edge portions into sealing engagement with adjacent surfaces, a pair of cup-shaped metallic casings 17 and 18 may be employed. Adjacent the free edges of the latter, threads 19 are conveniently furnished. These serve to connect the sections and also draw them toward each other. Shifted in this manner, the base portions of the sections will engage the outer faces of cups 5 and 6 or else thrust against the latter. Under these circumstances, a sealing relationship is established such that it will be virtually impossible for foreign material to move into the space defined by the interior of the cups.

For example, within cup 5 an automatic lancet mechanism may be disposed. This may have one or more of its surfaces engaged with and supported by nozzle portion 9. This specific mechanism forms the subject matter of a separate application for United States Letters Patent. In brief and as shown, it may include a housing 12, which movably supports a slashing blade 13. The latter is moved by a power mechanism within housing 12 and which mechanism may be potentialized by, for example, a crank 14. If desired, there may be additionally disposed within the bore of cup 5 an aseptic marking or applicator stick 15. The purpose of this unit will be hereinafter brought out.

Returning to a consideration of cup 6, it will be noted that a cutting blade 16 may be interposed between the pair of vials It). That blade can take the form of a more or less conventional backed razor blade such as is currently upon the market. The outer end of casing section 18 may be distended, as indicated at 20, to define an opening. Extending through that opening is the body of a cord or line 21, formed of any suitable material. It should, however, embody resistance to rot and disintegration. Its ends are conveniently knotted as at 22, so that they may not pass through a link 23, preferably formed of metal and housed within the distended portion 20. The link 23, as shown, being preferably rounded, excessive abrading or wear of the cord will be prevented. Also, the latter will be maintained by the link in a position such that it does not rub against the edge defining the opening in distended portion 20.

In use, the apparatus may be assembled as shown in Fig. 1. If the cord 21 is looped around the belt of the user or similarly disposed, the entire appliance will be supported by that loop. If it is necessary to use the assembly, all that will have to be done is to release section 17 from section 18. Thereupon, cup 5 may be desirably collapsed and applied to the area of the bite in order to exert suction or withdraw venom from the punctures. To facilitate such withdrawal, however, it is preferable to employ the lancet mechanism indicated at 12, 13 and 14 in order to make a suitable number of incisions across the punctured area.

If there is danger that within the area to be slashed a relatively large blood vessel is located, then the danger of cutting that vessel may be materially minimized by initially applying the tourniquet provided by cord 21 around the limb at a point above the area of puncture. With the tourniquet tightly applied, the blood vessels will distend. Thereupon, the marking or applicator stick 15 may be employed to mark areas of the skin surface within which no blood vessel is present. Of course, the affected area may also be shaved by blade 16. In any event, the lancet mechanism may now be efiectively employed for the desired purpose. The application of the tourniquet to the limb has been shown in Fig. 3. In that view, in addition to the link 23, a washer 24 may form part of the assembly and be disposed at a point adjacent the knot. In any event, with the tourniquet of this type, and by the use merely of one hand, it is entirely feasible to draw a loop as tightly as desired around the limb. Thereupon the tourniquet may be released, but will remain in constricted position. By simply grasping the cord 21 adjacent its knotted inner end 22, the loop of the tourniquet releases and that appliance may be removed from the limb.

Where a puncture has occurred within a member of reduced area, then the adaptor plate is employed. This would be the case, for example, where the puncture has occurred in a finer or toe. In this connection, it is apparent that the area of the nozzle 9 is materially reduced over the diameter defined by the free edge of either cup 5 or 6. Where extensive treatment is necessary, then, of course, both suction cups will be simultaneously used. As shown in Fig. 4, the opening defined by nozzle 9 may be oval. As also indicated in that view, plate 7 will be snugly retained by cup 6, so that this part of the assembly forms one compact unit.

The operation of the assembly, as shown in Fig. 5, will. of course, be substantially identical with the technique just described. In that view, it will be noted that the numerals 25 and 26 indicate casing sections corresponding to the sections 17 and 18. These sections are also coupled preferably by screw threads 27, so that they may form a single unit and may also be drawn toward each other. A plate 28 is preferably disposed adjacent the outer end of section 26. A suction nozzle 29, the bore of which is preferably tapered, is provided with a flange 30, at its base. That flange defines a diameter larger than the opening provided in section 26. Such opening is defined by an inwardly-extending flange portion 32 of the casing.

Within the latter, a rubber suction cup 33 is disposed. That cup corresponds to cups 5 and 6. It is preferably furnished with an internal groove 34, which has a diameter such that it may receive and retain flange 30. Obviously, other forms of coupling might be provided. As shown in this view, the initial assembly of the kit provides for the flange 30 being interposed between plate 28 and flange 32.

As thread 27 is coupled, sections 25 and 26 will be drawn toward each other. This will assure plate 28 firmly bearing against the edge of cup 33. Similarly, it will clamp the flange of the suction nozzle between its outer face and flange 32. Therefore, the parts will not rattle or become damaged. The bore defined by nozzle 31 is such that the link 23 of tourniquet 21 and the knots formed in the end of that member will not pass through the bore.

Thus, the entire assembly may be worn or carried by passing the wearers belt through the loop of the tourniquet. When the assembly is to be used, the belt is detached and casings 25 and 26 separated. Plate 23 will have maintained the interior of cup 33 in completely clean condition. That interior may accommodate the vials, the lancet and parts as previously described. With the separation of the casing sections and removal of the plate, these parts will be accessible and may be removed from the cup. With such removal, the outer edge of the latter may be coupled with the base portion of the nozzle. Therefore, the suction assembly will now be ready for use. As afore-brought out, the procedure will otherwise be identical.

Thus, among others, the several objects of the invention as specifically aforenoted are achieved. Obviously.

numerous changes in construction and rearrangements of the parts might be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the claims.

I claim:

1. A snake bite kit, comprising, in combination, a pair of resilient suction cups arranged with their edges adjacent each other, a pair of encasing members enclosing said cups, means for drawing said members toward each other to engage the base portions of said cups and force the edges thereof toward each other to seal the interior thereof, a plate interposed between the edge portions of the cups, and a collar extending from said plate in one direction and intimately contacting an adjacent side wall base of one of said cups.

2. A snake bite kit, comprising, in combination, a pair of resilient suction cups arranged with their edges adjacent each other, a pair of encasing members enclosing said cups, means for drawing said members toward each other to engage the base portions of said cups and force the edges thereof toward each other to seal the interior thereof, a plate interposed between the edge portions of the cups, a collar extending from said plate in one three tion and intimately contacting an adjacent side wall base of one of said cups, and a nozzle projecting from the plate in an opposite direction to extend into the bore of the second cup.

3. A snake bite kit, comprising, in combination, a pair of resilient suction cups arranged with their edges adjacent each other, a pair of encasing members enclosing said cups, means for drawing said members toward each other to engage the base portions of said cups and flex part of at least one of the same to force the edges of the cups toward each other to seal the interiors thereof, one of said encasing members being formed with an opening substantially in line with the adjacent base of one of the cups, and a tourniquet extending from within said encasing member through said opening to provide an exterior supporting member for said kit the part of the tourniquet lying inwardly of said one encasing member being disposed between the flexed part of one cup and the adjacent inner face of said member.

4. A snake bite kit, comprising, in combination, a pair of resilient suction cups arranged with their edges adjacent each other, a pair of encasing members enclosing said cups and having open adjacent ends, means for drawing said members toward each other to engage the base portions of said cups and force the edges thereof toward each other to seal the interiors thereof, one of said encasing members being formed with an opening substantially in line with the adjacent base of one of tie cups, a tourniquet extending from within said encasing member through said opening to provide an exterior sup porting member for said kit, and a metallic link within said encasing member adjacent said opening and defining a space of lesser area than said opening to maintain said tourniquet out of contact with the edge of said encasing member; said tourniquet being freely withdrawable through the open end of said one encasing member.

5. A snake bite kit, comprising, in combination, a pair of resilient suction cups arranged with their edges adjacent each other, a pair of encasing members enclosing said cups and having open adjacent ends, means for drawing said members toward each other to engage the base portions of said cups and force the edges thereof toward each other to seal the interiors thereof, one of said encasing members being formed with an opening substantially in line with the adjacent base of one of the cups, a tourniquet extending from within said encasing member through said opening to provide an exterior supporting member for said kit, the end of said tourniquet being interposed between the adjacent cup base and the surface of the end encasing member to subject said cup to a compressive action and said tourniquet being freely withdrawable through the open end of said one encasing member.

6. In a snake bite kit, an open ended encasing member to receive a suction cup, said member being formed with an opening, a tourniquet passing through said opening, and a link associated with said tourniquet and lying adjacent the inner face of said member in line with said opening, said link defining an area less than that of said opening to maintain said tourniquet out of contact with the edges of the latter and said tourniquet being freely withdrawable through the open end of said one encasing member.

7. A snake bite kit, comprising, in combination, a pair of resilient suction cups, receiving within their bores accessory appliances, a plate mounted by one of said cups, a nozzle portion forming a part of said plate and extending into the bore of the other cup, and said nozzle portion furnishing an appliance support within the bore of the latter cup.

8. A kit assembly comprising, in combination, a resilient suction cup, a casing enclosing said cup and comprising a pair of sections, a nozzle having at least a part disposed in said casing, and means for coupling said sections to draw the same toward each other and force said cup toward said nozzle part.

9. A kit assembly as specified in claim 8, one of said sections being formed with an opening and a part of said assembly extending from Within said casing through said opening to provide a supporting member.

10. A kit assembly as specified in claim 8, and a plate forming a part of said assembly and bearing against the edge of said cup as said sections are drawn toward each other.

11. A kit assembly as specified in claim 8, one of said 6 casing sections being formed with an opening and the body of said nozzle extending through said opening.

12. A kit assembly as specified in claim 8, one of said casing sections being formed with an opening, the body of said nozzle extending through said opening beyond said casing and said nozzle part comprising a flange having a diameter too large to pass through said opening, said part being interposed between said cup and a surface of the casing adjacent said opening.

13. A kit assembly as specified in claim 12, said cup being formed with a groove adjacent its lip and said groove being adapted to receive said flange part of the nozzle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 336,344 Perry Feb. 16, 1886 1,654,888 King Jan. 3, 1928 2,204,947 Apfelbaum June 18, 1940 2,447,844 Cutter Aug. 24, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS 76,773 Denmark Nov. 30, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US336344 *Dec 8, 1884Feb 16, 1886 Glass barrel
US1654888 *Mar 25, 1926Jan 3, 1928Francis KingOphthalmic massage instrument
US2204947 *Aug 30, 1939Jun 18, 1940Abe MaskowCosmetic wiper
US2447844 *Nov 30, 1944Aug 24, 1948Cutter LabSnake bite kit
DK76773A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3951260 *Nov 25, 1974Apr 20, 1976Frazee Kenneth GSurvival kit
US8128949 *Apr 14, 2008Mar 6, 2012John MosherKit for insect bites
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/572, 206/228, 206/370, 206/803
International ClassificationA61B17/32, A61F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F17/00, A61B17/32, Y10S206/803
European ClassificationA61B17/32, A61F17/00