Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2826770 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1958
Filing dateSep 13, 1956
Priority dateSep 13, 1956
Publication numberUS 2826770 A, US 2826770A, US-A-2826770, US2826770 A, US2826770A
InventorsFreeman William B L
Original AssigneeFreeman William B L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of making a welt shoe with welt-forming sole
US 2826770 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 18, 1958 w. B. L. FREEMAN I 2,826,770

PROCESS OF MAKING A- WELT snox: WITH WELTFORMING\SOLE Filed Sept. 15, 1956 f s Sheets-:Sheet 1 I I Fig.l

IN VEN TOR.

.1958 w. B. L. FREEMAN 2,826,77

PROCESS OFMAKING A WELT SHOE WITH WELT-FORMING SOLE Filed Sept. 13-, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 18,1958 w. B. L. FREEMAN 2,826,770

PROCESS OF MAKING A WELT SHOE wm-x WELT-FORMING SOLE Filed Sept.- 13, 1956 3 Shee'ts-Sheet 5 INVENTOR.

United States Patent i) i PROCESS OF MAKING A WELT sHoE WITH WELT-FORMING SOLE William B. L. Freeman, Brookline, Mass. Application September 13, 1956, Serial No. 610,050 13 Claims. (Cl. 12-142) This invention comprises a new and improved process of making welt shoes in which the upper is fitted to a last, pulled over and lasted thereon. V H v The process of my invention is characterized by the employment of a welt-forming sole in accordance with the following steps, viz. securing to the bottom of a lasted upper a flat sole, hereinafter termed a welt sole, having a partially severed blank in its forepart. which defines a fiat marginal welt strip, removing the last and attaching the upper to the said Welt strip by stitching or cement, then removing the partially severed .blank, laying an outsole and stitching it to the welt strip thus provided. desired, a light flexible filler or cushion may be inserted to replace the removed blank.

In forming a welt as above, outlined, certain disadvantages of the conventional Goodyear welt shoe are obviated. Instead of dealing with a loose welt strip that requires a high degree of skill in properly locating and attaching and then requires a welt beating operation preparatory to receiving an outsole, my improved process provides at once from the material of the welt sole a. thin, fiat, accurately located welt strip and'so obviates-the costly weltsewing and welt beating operations. On the con.- trary, the welt strip is economically formed as a stock fitting operation and is properly located inv the. routine step oflaying the midsole that requires no high degree of skill; It will thus be apparent that my novel process may be carried out by regular and conventional stepsof shoemaking.

In accordance with my novel process the welt may be formed about the forepart of the shoe only or about the entire periphery of the shoe with or without employing av dutchman in the heel seat. I employ as the welt sole of my process a conventional midsole or forepart slip sole and die out a blankfrom the center or from the forepart of such shape as to define a flat marginal'welt strip. The.

died out blank may be completely severed: andhel'cl'. in place during the shoemaking process by means of;tape or staplesor stitching, or it may be partially severed, and

retained in place by unsevered key spots ofminimaldimension. The midsole or Welt sole may be of any'material ordinarily used for such shoe parts asleather, rubber, or any of the synthetic solematerialsnow available in the open market.

Welt shoes constructed in accordance with my novel process have the advantage of lightness, flexibility and economy of manufacture. By removing the blank from theinterior'of the midsole, the stiff plywood elfect in the shoe b'ottom' is avoided and flexibility greatly increased. The shoe is made lighter because, the blank removed from themidsole is replaced by a light flexible cushion of I felt, foam rubber, cork or the like. The Welt strip is accurately and properly located once for all in correct and predetermined curvature and by this expedient a welt strip may be provided in shoes such as those of the gen-.

nine moccasin type where it has been heretofore diflicult to attach weltinguniformly and efficiently. The presence of the partially severed blank during the step "of sewing the upper thereto holds the la'st'ed shoe in its initial lasted position and positively stabilizes and prevents misplacement of the welt along the longitudinal and lateral axes of the shoe. It is also noted that the transverse line of stabilization is preferably at the ball line of the shoe. Thus is produced a shoe which is light, which is flexible, which adds nothing complicated to conventional shoemaking processes, which can be repaired, which has the appearance of a doube'sole shoe, and is more economical to produce than any type of shoe heretofore known having; these valuable characteristics.

The removal and replacement of the blank from the midsole gives the manufacturer the advantage that hemay quite properly utilize low grades of midsoles with scars or other defects in portions because of the fact that many of these defect s'will be removed with the severed blank. This permits the manufacturer to achieve animportant reduction in the'cost of his rni'dsoles. Further, because of the fact that the entire unit is preformed and goes through the midsole laying and attaching process as a unit, shoes of uniform or identical appearance may be made because the fixed outer edge of the midsole is used as a [guide for subsequent operations. Ordinarily in at tempting to attach welts to shoes other than Goodyearwelt shoes, many shoes are damaged where the welt runs elf from its true location in certain spots. In practising, the process of the present invention damage of this sort" is entirely obviated. Another advantage is that the Walt strip is formed continuously and there is no" necessity of splicing to join the endsof the welt. and impossibility of' opening occurring at the splice? which would; of course, result in rejects. V p 4, s

The shoe produced 'a's'above outlined; while having a bottom of substantial thickness, is'subjstantially as light and. more flexible than a single sole shoe. It provides comfort to the wearer not any by'its' increased lightness' and fie'xibility, but also on account of the bushion'charateristics imparted to it by' the filler; When 'it becomes necessary the shoe may be repaired in the usual'manner with all the'convenience'ofa.welttshoe. 7

These and other advantages of the invention will be best understood and appreciated from the following. description of 'a preferred mannerof carrying out the pro'c ess illustrated in-the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a view inperspectiv'e'ofa lastedupper of the moccasintype; I V

Fig. 2 is a similar view'showingthe midsolein position on the shoebottom, H I p 7 Fig. 3 is a 'similar'viewsuggesting the replacementof the partially severed blank'by a fillercushion,

Fig. 4 is a view incro'ss section of'the 'forepart of the-- shoe on an enlarged scale, v v

Fig. 5 is:a plan viewshowing the lasted upper of-the Littleway type,- V p v Fig.- 6 is -a similar'view showing, the welt sole iirposi tion on the shoe bottom, and

Fig. 7 is "a view in .cross-sectionof the forepart of the shoe on an enlarged'scale; p

In producing themoccasin type shoe-as shown iii-Figs. 1-4 of the drawings theupper'i's fully lasted-intheusual;

, manner forming a hottomportionor insole member 10 12. The forepart of :thevainpmayg be.then trimmed and closed by sewinginto it theusualforepartplug; These are conventional stepsin.themanufacture-of trueamoc casin type shoes and in makingis'hoes of theother types mentioned similar steps arefollowed except that the upper is lasted over a last having, aninsole which takes-the -place" of the bottom portion 10 of the moccasin type shoe. g

In carrying out the present invention a weltsole 13 is dried out or rounded to the proper size, and in this step a forepart blank 14 is died out or partly died out in such manner as to define a marginal welt strip 15 which extends laterally beyond the upper sufficiently to be used as the normal outsole attachment base; If the blank 14 is completely died out=it may be detachably connected and retained in place by tabs of tape joining it to the adjacent edge portions of the midsole 13 or, as herein shown, key points of-integral attachment may be left intact. In any case the blank remains in place during the sole laying operation and a subsequent stitching operation. In Fig. 2 the midsole or welt sole 13 is shown as having been laid and adhesively attached to the shoe bottom. In this condition a pair of opposite and longitudinally spaced points and another pair of opposite and transversely spaced points integrally connect blank 14 directly to the midsole 13.

The last is now removed and the midsole 13 stitched to the overlasted bottom portion by a line of stitching 16 which may be either of the McKay or Littleway type as desired. The line of stitching 16 may pass entirely arount the margin of the shoe including the heel seat, or it may terminate at the heel breast line, and the mid sole may be of integral construction or include a dutchman for its heel seat portion. The stitching operation is carried out while the blank 14 remains in place and consequently, due to the welt strip 15 being stabilized by its securement to the blank 14, the outer edge of the marginal welt strip of the midsole serves as a reliable guide. The presence of the blank prevents distortion or displacement of the weltstrip 15 so that accuracy of stitching is insured without requiringany unusual skill on the part of the operator.

When the seam 16 has been completed, the blank 14 is removed as suggested in Fig. 3 and replaced by filler material which may take the form of a sponge rubber blank 17 or other light cushion material.

The shoe is completed by laying an outsole 18 upon the midsole and filler and securing it to the welt strip 15 by a stitchline 19, this being preferably a lockstitch seam concealed in a channel of the outsole as clearly shown in Fig. 4.

In producing a shoe of the Littleway type as shown in Figs. 5-7 the upper 21 is fully lasted over an insole upon the last bottom. The overlasted margin of the upper is indicated by reference character 22. In this instance the overlasted margin is secured to the insole by staples and cement in the conventional manner.

In carrying out the present invention a welt sole 23 is died out in such manner as to define a marginal welt strip extending laterally sufliciently to be used as the normal outsole attachment base and detachably connected and retained in place in the sole by key points of integral attachment which are left intact. In any case the blank remains in place during the sole laying operationandthe subsequent stitching operation which takes place after the upper is removed from the last. As shown in Fig. 6 the Littleway lockstitch seam 26 extends through the insole 20, the overlasted margin 22 of the upper and the welt strip 25 formed about the forepart of the welt sole.

The stitching operation is carried out while the blank 24 remains in place and consequently, due to the welt strip 25 being stabilized by its securement to the blank 24, the outer edge of the marginalwelt strip 25 serves as a reliable guide for the stitching mechanism. 'As 'in the moccasin type shoe the presence of the blank 24 prevents distortion or displacement ofthe welt strip so that the accuracy of the stitching is insured.

When the seam 26 has beencompleted, the blank 24 is removed and replaced by filler material which may take the form of a sponge rubber blank 27.

The shoe is completed by laying an outsole 28 'upon the midsole and filler and securing it to the welt strip 25 by cement or other suitable means.

detail a preferred manner of carrying it out, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. The process of making a moccasin shoe which comprises the. steps of lasting a moccasin vamp having a sole element, preliminarily attaching to the sole portion of the lasted vamp a midsole having a blank fitting within its forepart and shaped and disposed to define the inner periphery of a marginal welt strip, said blank being connected with said welt strip only at a plurality of pairs of opposed points, at least one of said pairs of points being located at positions disposed for stabilizing the toe end of said welt strip, removing the last and sewing the upper to said welt strip while the welt strip is being stabilized by its connections with said blank, disconnecting said blank from the welt strip atsaid points, removing the blank from the forepart and replacing it with a flexible filler, laying an outsole against said midsole, welt strip and filler and stitching said outsole to the welt strip.

2. The process of claim 1 wherein the upper is sewed to said midsole about its entire margin including the heel seat thereof as well as the welt strip of the forepart.

3. The process of claim 1 wherein said connections are provided by bonds integral with said blank and said welt strip.

4. The process of claim 1 wherein said one pair of points is located substantially along the longitudinal axis of the shoe.

5. The process of claim 1 wherein one of said pairs of points is located substantially along the ball line of the shoe.

6. The process of claim 1 wherein said bonds are of minimal dimension along the line of separation between said blank and said welt strip.

7. The process of claim 1 wherein there are but two pairs of opposed points, one pair being located substantially along the longitudinal axis of the shoe and the other pair being located substantially along the ball line of the shoe, and all the bonds being of minimal dimention along the line of separation between said blank and said welt strip.

8. The process of making a shoe which comprises the steps of preliminarily attaching to the lasted underlying portion of an upper forming a part of the shoe bottom construction a weltsole having an extension edge and a blank fitting within its forcpart and shaped and disposed to define in the sole the inner periphery of a marginal welt strip extending laterally beyond the upper sufficiently to be used as the normal outsole attachment base, said blank being connected with the welt strip only at a plurality of pairs of opposed points, at least one of said pairs of points being located at positions disposed for stabilizing the toe end of said welt strip, removing the last and sewing the upper to said welt strip while the welt strip is being stabilized by its connections with said blank, disconnecting said blank from the welt strip at said points, removing the blank from the forepart and replacing it with a flexible filler, laying an outsole against said weltsole and its marginal welt strip and filler, and attaching the outsole to the welt strip.

9. The process of making a shoe which comprises the steps of preliminarily attaching to the lasted underlying portion of an upper forming a part of the shoe bottom construction a weltsole having an extension edge and a stabilize the tip end of the toe portion of said welt strip, removing the last and sewing the upper to said welt strip while the welt strip is being stabilized by its connections with said blank, disconnecting said blank from the welt strip at said points, removing the blank from the forepart and replacing it with a flexible filler, laying an outsole against said weltsole and its marginal welt strip and filler, and attaching the outsole to the welt strip.

'10. The process of claim 8 wherein said one pair of points is located substantially along the longitudinal axis of the shoe.

11. The process of claim 8 wherein one of said pairs of points is located substantially along the ball line of the shoe.

12. The process of claim 9 wherein said connecting portions are of minimal dimension along the line of separation between said blank and said welt strip.

13. The process of claim 8 wherein there are but two pairs of opposed points, one pair being located substantially along the longitudinal axis of the shoe and the other pair being located substantially along the ball line of the shoe, and all the connecting points 'being of minimal dimension along the line of separation between said blank and said welt strip.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Slavin May 30, 1944 LWIIED STATES PATENT OFFICE (ZERTIFICATE 0F CGRRECTION Patent No 2,826,770 March 18, 1958 William B. L, Freeman It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1., line 1'7, after "lasted thereong" insert me While the invention has a particularly advantageous field of use in the manufacture of moccasin type shoes, it is by no means limited thereto but has a more general application to the manufacture of shoes by the Compo, McKay or Littleway Welt processesv In all instances, however, the process of this invention produces. shoes in which the upper is completely lasted and shaped to the last before the Welt-forming element is brought into its place in the shoe bottomn =--=n Signed and sealed this 29th day of April 1958.

SEAL) Attest:

KARL AXLINE ROBERT Ca WATSON Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US310159 *Nov 3, 1884Dec 30, 1884OAndrew j
US657095 *Jan 20, 1900Sep 4, 1900Ralphael De LeoShoe.
US1480978 *Aug 18, 1922Jan 15, 1924Abbott Donald BMoccasin
US1554489 *Jul 20, 1923Sep 22, 1925Rubberhide CompanyBoot or shoe
US1841328 *Feb 17, 1931Jan 12, 1932G H Bass & CoFootwear
US2145713 *Jan 4, 1934Jan 31, 1939Compo Shoe Machinery CorpShoe and the method of making same
US2235087 *Jul 28, 1938Mar 18, 1941United Shoe Machinery CorpShoe
US2350198 *Dec 20, 1943May 30, 1944Slavin Benjamin JProcess of manufacturing shoes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3270357 *Feb 8, 1965Sep 6, 1966Allan MacphersonProcess of making welt shoes
US3345663 *Sep 19, 1963Oct 10, 1967Batchelder Rubico IncProcess for making shoe having cross-linked rand insole
US3813719 *Jul 10, 1972Jun 4, 1974Malich A Gmbh FaMethod of making shoes
US4012853 *May 20, 1976Mar 22, 1977Genesco. Inc.Forepart insole ring shoe construction
US4793079 *May 6, 1987Dec 27, 1988Max Dei F. 11I Vico & C. S.P.A.Process for the manufacturing of footwear and footwear obtained through this process
US5768801 *Feb 8, 1996Jun 23, 1998Meldisco H.C., Inc.Welt shoe comfort system
US5911491 *Nov 26, 1997Jun 15, 1999Footstar, Inc.Welt shoe comfort system
US6092307 *Jan 25, 1999Jul 25, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Self-locating sole
WO1997028712A1 *Feb 8, 1997Aug 14, 1997Footstar CorpWelt shoe comfort system
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/142.00D, 12/142.0MC, 36/11, 36/17.00R
International ClassificationA43B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B15/00
European ClassificationA43B15/00