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Publication numberUS2827628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1958
Filing dateAug 7, 1953
Priority dateAug 7, 1953
Publication numberUS 2827628 A, US 2827628A, US-A-2827628, US2827628 A, US2827628A
InventorsEhrbar Edward J, Frank Swinehart
Original AssigneeCornell Dubilier Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ultra high frequency antenna
US 2827628 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l 1. ygg .(wgfi I. 5 .l 2 I 2 v al 4 5 m 8 I 4 g I. QWQWQ 00 0 1 INVENTORS FRANK SWINEHART 8 BY EDWARD J- EHRBAR ATTORNEYS w O g OM M 3 A avg March 18, 1958 March 18, 1958 F. SWINEHART ET AL 2,327,628

ULTRA HIGH FREQUENCY ANTENNA Filed Aug. 7, 1953 KSheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2

INVENTORS- FRANK SWINEHART a BY EDWARD J. EHRBAR ATTORNEYS Mardl 1953 F. SWINEHART ET AL 2,827,628

ULTRA HIGH FREQUENCY ANTENNA ULTRA HIGH FREQUENCY ANTENNA Frank Swin h r Penna, nd d rd h eland, Ohio, assignors to Cornell-Dubilier Electric Corporation, South Plainfield, N. 3., a corporation of Delaware Application August 7, 1953, Serial No. 372,982

3 Claims. (Cl. 343-1806) This invention relates generally to television antennas, but has reference more particularly to an antenna which is especially adapted for ultra high frequency reception.

It has heretofore been proposed, as in Sheriff Patent 2,631,235, to provide an antenna consisting of a plurality of electrically conducting elements arranged to form two isosceles triangles with the apices of the shorter sides of the triangles disposed adjacent and connected with each other, the shorter sides of the two triangles at one side of the line of symmetry being separated from the shorter sides of the two triangles at the other side of the line of symmetry by means of an insulating block. The antenna therein disclosed is designed for use in a horizontal plane, and the use of the insulating block is disadvantageous in that it provides an area which can easily become coated with snow, ice or other foreign matter, which would act to provide a short between the shorter sides of the triangles in the area of the apices.

In other patents, as for example, the Cotchefer Patent 2,452,106 and Jackson Patent 2,471,215, similar arrangements of triangles have been proposed for antenna purposes, in which the triangular arrangements are disposed in vertical planes, but these have also been found disadvantageous, in that the bases of the triangles are extended vertically, and the areas across the adjacent apices are shorted in some manner.

The present invention has as its primary object, the provision of a novel antenna which overcomes all of the foregoing disadvantages, and which, at the same time, affords greatly improved reception, particularly of stations in the ultra high frequency bands or channels.

Another object of the invention is to provide an a tenna of the character described, which consists of elements which can be manufactured at relatively low cost, and quickly and easily assembled.

A further object of the invention is to provide an antenna of the character described, which is readily adaptable for forming multiple antenna arrays of various types.

Other objects and advantages of our invention will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification and in which like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same,

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of an antenna embodying ourinvention;

Fig. 2 isa fragmentary cross-sectional view, taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the antenna of Fig. 1, as viewed in the direction indicated by the line 33 of Fig. 1; r

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but showing a multiple antenna array embodying components of our antenna;

Fig. 5 is a view showing another arrangement of antennas, and i Fig. 6 is a view showing still another arrangement of antennas.

nited States Patent 0 2,827,628 Patented Mar. 18, 1958 Referring more particularly to Figs. 1 to 3 of the drawings, the antenna will be seen to comprise a reflector 1, of rectangular form, and preferably made of expanded metal, the reflector being normally disposed in a vertical plane, For lightness in weight and for its electrical properties, the reflector is preferably made of aluminum.

The reflector 1 is adapted to be secured to a vertical mast 2, as by means of a U-boit 3 and a clamp 4, the arms, 5 at e b lt 3. Pass n m h gs n the clamp. The ciamp i is maintained in contact with the mm by mean f ut 6 t r a ed se d to h arms 5 Secured to the front face of the reflector 1, along the vertical center line or axis of the reflector, is a metallic plate 7 having forwardly extending side flanges 8, a reinforcing plate 9 being also secured to the front face of the plate 7 at the approximate center of the plate 7. The plates 7 and 9' are provided with registering holes 14 and 11 respectively, through which the arms 5 of the bolt 3 pass, so that the bolt 3, when drawn up against the plate 9, as shown in Fig. 3, functions to secure the plates 7 and 9 to the reflector.

The antenna further includes a pair of antenna elements 14 and 15, each formed from a length of aluminum wire or rod, these elements being of identical construction. For purposes of facilitating description of the antenna, however, the corresponding parts of each element will be designated by different reference numerals.

The element 14 includes vertically-spaced horizontallyextending base portions 16 and 17, and side portions 13 and 19;, which converge with each other and are interconnected at their juncture by a rounded eye 21' Sirnilarly, the element 15 includes vertically-spaced horizontally-extending base portions 21 and 22, and side portions 23 and 24 which converge with each other and are interconnected at their juncture by a rounded eye 25.

At the. inner end of the base portion 16, the element 14 is bent to provide a rearwardly extending strut portion 26, the rear end of which is bent to provide an eye 27 which is disposed in a plane parallel with the plate 7. At the inner end of the base portion 17, the element 14 is bent to provide a rearwardly extending strut portion 28, the rear end of which is bent to provide an eye 29 which is disposed in a plane parallel with the plate 7.

At the inner end of the base portion 21, the element 15 is bent to provide a rearwardly extending strut portion 30, the rear end of which is bent to provide an eye 31 which is disposed in a plane parallel with the plate 7. At the inner end of the base portion 22, the element 15 is bent to provide a rearwardly extending strut portion 32, the rear end of which is bent to provide an eye 33 which is disposed in a plane parallel with the plate 7.

The strut portions 26 and 30 are disposed in a cornmen horizontal plane, and diverge from each other in a direction towards the plate 7. The strut portions 28 and 32 are likewise disposed in a common horizontal plane, and diverge from each other in a direction toward the plate '7.

The eyes 27, 29, 31 and 33 are secured to the plate 7 by the heads of bolts 34 which extend through holes 35 in the plate 7, through the expanded metal reflector 1 and through clamping brackets 36 disposed adjacent the rear face of the reflector, and are secured in position by means of nuts 37 secured to the bolts 34.

The base portions 16 and 21 are electrically connected to each other at their inner ends by means of: clamping brackets 38, which are secured in position by means of bolts 39 and nuts 40. The base portions 17 and 22 are similarly connected to each other at their inner ends by means of clamping brackets 41, which are secured in position by means of bolts 42 and nuts 43. The brackets 38'and 41 also aid in rigidifying the antenna construction as a whole, and in maintaining the portions 16 to 25 inclusive in a common vertical plane spaced forwardly from the plane of the reflector 1 and parallel with the latter. e

The eyes 20 and 25 are adapted for the connection thereto of the wires of a transmission line 44, as by means of bolts 45, and nuts 46 and 47.

The antenna, as thus constructed, comprises, in'eflect, two isosceles triangles with the apices opposite the base thereof cutofl or truncated. The triangular frames thus formed are arranged in alvertical plane, with the truncated apices of the shorter sides of the triangles disposed adjacent each other to form a loop of substantially the form of an hourglass in profile, with the transmission line 44 connected thereto at points spaced on opposite sides of the narrowest or throat portion of the loop. The bases of the triangles, consisting of the portions 16-21. and 17+22 respectively, extending in a horizontal direction, in which direction, maximum receptivity is obtained, when used to receive horizontally polarized radiated waves. For the reception of vertically polarized radiated waves, the bases of the triangles extend in a vertical direction.

The shorter sides of the two triangles at one side of the line of symmetry AA, are separated from the shorter sides of the two triangles at the other side of the line of connected by a bar 77 and the bars 74 and 76 by a bar' 78. The bars 77 and 78 have connected thereto at points midway between their ends, the 'wires ofza transmission line 79.

The terms vertical, horizontal and parallel, as

j employed herein are to be construed as covering situations symmetry, by an air gap G, so that there is virtually no The antenna is readily adaptable for stacking or forming multiple antenna arrays of various types. One such arrangement is shown in Fig. 4, in which a'single' large reflector 50, of expanded metah supports four antenna units of the form described, with two of the units 51 and 52 arranged sideby side, and above two similar units 53 and 54, also arranged in side by side relationship. The

eyes 20 of the units 51 and 52 are interconnected by a stacking *bar 55, and the eyes 25 of the units 51 and 52 are similarlyinterconnected by a stacking bar 56. The eyes 200i the units 53 and 54 are interconnected by'a stacking bar 57 and the eyes 25 of the units 53' and 54 are similarly interconnected by a stacking bar 58. The c stacking bars 55 and 57 are interconnected by a bar 59,

. and the stacking bars 56 and 58 are interconnected by a bar 60. The bars 59 and 6t) have connected thereto at points midway between their ends, the wires of a transmission line 61.

In Fig. 5, another multiple antenna array is shown more or less diagrammatically, in which four of the units are stacked one above the other. In this arrangement,

the eyes 20 and .25. of the units 62 and 63 are interconnected by a stacking bar 64, and the eyes 25 and 20 of the units 62 and 63 are interconnected bya stacking bar 65. The 'eyes 20 and 25 of the units 66 and 67 are interconnected by a stacking bar '68, and the eyes 25 and2tl 'of the units 66 and 67 are similarly interconnected by a stacking bar 69. a The eyes 2 0 of the units 63 and 66 are joined by a bar 70, and the eyes 25 of these units by a 'bar'71. The bars 70 and 71 have connected thereto at points midway between their ends, the wires of a transmission line'72.

in which there is substantial deviation from the vertical or horizontal, or from a condition of strict parallelism, as the case may be. Moreover, the terms triangle, triangular, and the like, are, to be construed as covering forms or contours which are substantially triangular.

It is to be understood that the forms of our invention, herewith shown and described, are to be taken as preferred examples of the same, and that various changes in the shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit of our invention, or the scope of the subjoined claims.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:"

1. In a polarized antenna system, a plurality of electrically conducting elements connected'to form an open frame member substantially in the form of an isosceles triangle with the apex opposite the base thereof truncated, a similar group of electricallyconducting elements connected to form a second open frame member substantially in the form of a similar isosceles triangle with the apex opposite the base thereof truncated, means electrically and mechanically connecting the corresponding free ends of the truncated sides of said frame members together in substantially vertical coplanar relation to form a loop of substantially the shape of an hourglass in profile, means mounnng said loop in a position in which the bases of said triangular frame members are arranged in parallel substantially horizontal relation whereby to receive horizontally polarized reflected waves, and means for. connecting opposite sides of a transmission'line to the loop at points spaced on opposite sides of the narrowest portion of said loop. V o i 2. An antenna-system, as defined in claim 1, in which a reflector is provided which is disposed in a substantially vertical plane, and said loop is disposed in a plane spaced from the plane of the reflector and substantially parallel with said reflector, and means electrically connecting said loop to said reflector. e i 7 3. An antenna system, as defined in claim 2, in which said open frame members areformed from lengths of wire having strut portions extending'rearwardly to the reflector, whereby the open frame members are supported by the reflector. v

References Cited in the file' of thispatent' V UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Wolf: Triplex Antennamfor TV and FM Electronics,

vol. 20, July 1947, PP. 88- 91.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2433183 *Feb 27, 1945Dec 23, 1947Rca CorpAntenna system
US2480154 *Jan 27, 1945Aug 30, 1949Rca CorpAntenna
US2558727 *Jul 1, 1942Jul 3, 1951Bernet Edwin JAntenna
US2615005 *Sep 20, 1950Oct 21, 1952White Henry ATelevision antenna
US2631235 *Oct 20, 1950Mar 10, 1953Sheriff Jack WavelynAntenna
US2687475 *Apr 11, 1950Aug 24, 1954Andrew CorpLow-frequency antenna
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2935747 *Mar 5, 1956May 3, 1960Rca CorpBroadband antenna system
US3123826 *Aug 17, 1960Mar 3, 1964Lakewood Manufacturing Corporationdurham
US4485385 *Jun 15, 1982Nov 27, 1984Rca CorporationBroadband diamond-shaped antenna
US4814784 *Oct 23, 1985Mar 21, 1989Grumman Aerospace CorporationIndividual self-erecting antenna
US5936590 *Apr 13, 1993Aug 10, 1999Radio Frequency Systems, Inc.Antenna system having a plurality of dipole antennas configured from one piece of material
US8773322 *Sep 26, 2011Jul 8, 2014Gary Gwoon WongHigh performance HDTV antenna design and fabrication
US20120081260 *Sep 26, 2011Apr 5, 2012Gary Gwoon WongHigh performance HDTV antenna design and fabrication
EP1054470A2 *Jul 16, 1999Nov 22, 2000Italtel s.p.a.Antenna with low visual impact
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/806, 343/794, 343/795, 343/793, 343/814, 343/815
International ClassificationH01Q19/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q19/10
European ClassificationH01Q19/10