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Publication numberUS2827873 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1958
Filing dateAug 10, 1956
Priority dateAug 10, 1956
Publication numberUS 2827873 A, US 2827873A, US-A-2827873, US2827873 A, US2827873A
InventorsThorn Harry F
Original AssigneeGeorge W Swift Jr Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatically regulated adhesive applying apparatus
US 2827873 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 1958 H. F. THORN AUTOMATICALLY REGULATED ADHESIVE APPLYING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 10, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet l IN V EN TOR. HA REY f? THORN. BY

0444; T #11: MM 0..- ATTORNEYS.

March 25, 1958 i H. F. THORN AUTOMATICALLY REGULATED ADHESIVE APPLYING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 10, 1956 mNH ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent AUTOMATICALLY REGULATED ADHESIVE APPLYING APPARATUS Application August 10, 1956, Serial No. 603,375

2 Claims. 0. us -7 In the machinery used for the manufacture of single faced corrugated paper, and also in manufacturing corrugated paper board, it has long been conventional to provide a rotating adhesive applying roll past which a corrugated paper web is continuously fed in such manner that adhesive carried by the roll is applied successively to the peaks of the corrugations as they pass the roll, the adhesively coated peaks being then successively pressed into contact with a traveling .web to which the corrugated web is to be bonded, and heat being applied to promote the rapid and effective setting of the adhesive.

Prior to the present invention insofar as I am aware, regulation of the amount of adhesive thus applied has required manual adjustments which were made by the operator; customarily a scraper roll has been provided in the adhesive applying mechanism, which the operator could adjust manually to regulate the thickness of the adhesive film carried by the applicator roll, and in some prior machines. a variable speed transmission (e. g. the Reeves variable speed transmission) was provided in the mechanism which drove the applicator roll, which variable speed transmission the operator could adjust manually to regulate the speed of rotation of the applicator roll in relation to the speed of travel of the corrugated web.

In either event the regulation of the amount of adhesive applied was haphazard and uncertain, being at the whim of the operator, so that in some instances a defective product was obtained, and substantial amounts of adhesive wasted. In accordance with the present invention, the speed ratio adjusting member of such a variable speed transmission is power actuated by a regulating system responsive to the speed of travel of the corrugated web past the applicator roll, in such manner that when the corrugated web is traveling at relatively high speed, the surface speed of the applicator roll more nearly approaches the speed of travel of the corrugated web, and when the corrugated web is traveling atrel-' atively slower speed, the surface speed of the applicator roll is relatively slower as compared to the speed of travel of the corrugated web. Preferably the regulating system is so arranged that the ratio between the surface speed of the applicator roll and the speed of travel of the corrugated web, at given speeds in the higher range of web speed of travel, can be adjusted'without aflecting said ratio in the lower range of web speed, and vice versa. For example, the regulating system preferably is so arranged that at maximum speed of travel of the corrugated web, e. g. 500 per min., the regulating system can be set to produce a surface speed of the applicator roll at different ratios within the range of about 85 to 100% .of the speed of travel of the corrugated web; and can also be set so that at lowspeed of travel of the corrugated web, e. g. 100' per min., a surface speed of the applicator roll at different ratios within the range of about 70% to 85% of the corrugated web speed, may be obtained. .If. the scraper roll above rethickness on the applicator roll, the regulating system may be set to produce a surface speed of the applicator roll which is about of the speed of travel of the corrugated web, when the latter is traveling at a speed of per min.; and may also be set to produce a surface speed of the applicator roll which is about 93% of the speed of travel of the corrugated Web, when the latter is traveling at 500 per min.; the above mentioned ratios being independently adjustable as above referred to. The scraper roll being initially set, and the regulating system being, initially set to provide selected speed .ratios respectively at selected maximum and minimum speeds of corrugated web travel, thereupon without requiring further attention by the operator, the regulating system will automatically cause the applicator roll to apply progressively increasing amounts of adhesive to the peaks of the corrugations as the speed of travel of thecorrugated web is reduced from maximum down toward minimum, and conversely as the speed of corrugated web travel increases from minimum toward maximum, the amount of adhesive applied will progressively decrease. In this way, it is found that throughout the normal operating range in speed of travel of the corrugated web, adhesive in amounts needed to insure a satisfactory bond at the peaks of the corrugations, may be obtained under different speeds of operation without relying upon manual adjustments by the operator, thereby assuring a more uniform product of better quality, along with reduced consumption of adhesive. Further objects and advantages of the invention will be in part obvious and in part specifically poin ted out in the description hereinafter contained which, taken inconjunction with the accompanying drawings, discloses a preferred form of apparatus constructed to operate in ac cordance with the invention; the disclosure however should be regarded as merely illustrative of the inven tion in its broader aspects. In the drawingsr Fig. 1 is a side elevation, partly schematic and partly in section, showing the invention applied to single, faced corrugated paper which is passing to a so-called double backer in which latter double faced corrugated paper board is produced;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation showing more in detail, certain features which may be applied to the variable speed transmission used in practicing the invention; and

Fig. 3 is a combined circuit and block diagram of apparatus for regulating the, speed of the adhesive applying roll with respect to the speed of the corrugated web.

The invention is shownin Fig. 1 as applied to a web 1 of single faced corrugated paper which is traveling through the adhesive applying apparatus shown at the right of the figure, to the entrance end of a double-backer wherein a facing sheet or liner 2 is applied to the adhesively coated peaks of the corrugations of the web 1, to produce double faced corrugated paperboard, the adhesive being set by heat applied in the double-backer in the usual manner. The internal construction of the adhesive applying apparatus and double-backer will not be described in full detail since appropriate forms thereof are knownin the art, but' the adhesive applying apparatus may be understood as involving appropriate guide rolls 3, 4, and 5 past which the sheet'of single face-d corrugated paper 1 continuously travels in such manner that the peaks of the corrugations are successively with applicator roll-6. Adjustment .of the spacing of roll-- '7 from roll 6, in known manner enables the thickness-of The double-backer is shown as provided with theusiral traveling belt 9 'which'passes partiallyiaround a power driven drum carried by a shaft 11, and operating over input shaft of the variable speed transmission, and

similar tachometer generators 30 and 31 are indicated as a -table'12 which may be understood as heated in the. L

usual manner to drive off water from the adhesive carried by the peaks of the corrugations, the adhesive being set by the time the double faced corrugated paperboard is delivered from the double-backer. As shown the facing sheet 2 travels from an idler roll 13, and over-a heated apron 14 into the entrance end of the double-backer, where the adhesively coated peaks of the corrugated web 1 are progressively and successively pressed by the belt 9 into contact with the adjacent surface of the facing sheet 2 as the latter enters the double-backer.

For the purpose of regulating the amount of adhesive deposited on the peaks of the corrugations, a variable speed transmission such as the Reeves variable speed transmission shown .in outline in the lower left hand portionof Fig. 1, maybe employed. Appropriate'details of internalconstructoin for such a transmission'are known in the art. I a 7 1n the form shown, the speed of travel of the corrugated webthropghtheadhesiveapplying apparatus and through the double-backenis determined by the speed of travel of the belt 9, whichservesto draw the paper sheet through the adhesive applying apparatus. 'The power'input shaft 15 .ofthe variable speed transmission is shown as driven iniigred relationship to thespeed of travel .of the belt 9,

by means ofa sprocket 16 carried by the shaft 11 and driving a chain 17 which in turn drives the sprocket 18 carried by shaft 15,

. {The powervoutput shaft 19 of the variablespeedtr ansmissionis i-shown in-Fig. 1 as carrying. .a sprocket 20 wh ch drives a cl1ain21. The chain 21 drives aigear 22 which meshes with .a ear 23, which latter vrotates the adhesive applicator roll 6. The rate of rotation of the applicator roll 6, ,andtherefore the surface speed of .roll.6 and. the film ofadhesive carried thereby, as compared to the speedof travel of the web 1 passing through, the

adhesive I applying apparatus, dependsiuponthe speeds-ratio at. .which the variable speed transmission 14a islset, and his ratio m y-h filter dihy tat on .of he a justi spindle 24, which latter (and associated parts which will not be described indetail) maybeyunderstood' as of{oonstruction and ,mode of operation known in the art, By turning the ,adjustingmemher 24gin one direction or;the Q h f h su fa e speed o th pl tor $0 M a c pared to the speedoftravel of the c0r rugat ed-web1, and

therefore thelamount of adhesive deposited on the peaks.

of the. corrugations may be increased or decreased. V f I' he variablespeed transmission accordinglyis equipped with .an -appropriate regulating system which is responsive to changes inithe speed ,oftravel of thecorrugated web;

an h ch hnt t Settihghf the j s ing member 24 to regulate the amount of adhesive applied to thejpeaks of the corrugations under different operatingspeeds, in the manner already described. Thexdisclosed system is of the electrical type hut should be regarded as onlytypical.

In. theform shown, a reversible electric motor 251is indi-. cated' in Fig. 2 as controlling the settingof the adjusting member 24, through chain 26 and, appropriate sprockets,

being driven throughchain 32 and appropriate sprockets, from the power output shaft 19 of the variable speed transmission. Appropriate control circuits including these generators and the adjusting motor 25, are shown in Fig. 3.

In general, the circuits for automatically controlling the r t f th peed f t hh rut 5 i19 t he sp of input shaft 15, illustrated schematically, in Fig. 3, combine the output voltage of the generator 31 driven by the output shaft 19 with a fixedbias voltage and compare this combined voltage with the output voltage of the generator 28 driven by the input'shaft 15. The voltage difference, if any, between the combined voltages and the output voltage. of the generator 28 is used to control relays which cause operation of the motor and hence rotation of the spindle 24 which adjusts the speed of the output shaft 19 with respect to the input shaft 15 in a manner such thatthe ratio of the speeds is maintained at the desired value. Due to the presence of a fixed bias voltage, the ratio will be different in value when the web. speed is low' from the value of the ratio when the web speed is high without readjustment of the controls when the web speed-is changed. V

- 'In' -Fig. 3, one terminal of an alternating currentsource 35 is connected by a lead "36 to 'a conventional yoltage regulate r37 and is connected by a lead 38 to a centrifugal switch' 39. lfhe other terminal of the source 35 is connected by a lead 40 to' a manually. operable switch 41 and to an indicating lamp'42. When the switch 41 is in the Off position as shownin-Fig; 3, both the automatic circuits and the manually operable circuits for'rotating the'spindle 24 aredeenergized. When the switch 41 is moved to the position marked Man, the rotation of the spindle 24 may be controlled manually and when the switch .41 .is in' the position marked Auto, the rotation ofthe spindle 24 .is controlled by the automatic circuits, hereinafter described, provided thatrthe web speed is in excess of approximately 100 feet per minute.

: As described above, the output shaft 19 is coupled by means .of the chain 32 to conventional tachometer generators 30 and 31 and to the centrifugal switch'39. The generators 30 and 31 provide output voltages at their terminals Band 44 and 45 and 46 respectively, which are yariable with .and proportional to the speed of rotation of ithe. shaft.;19. Terminals 43 and 44 are connected to 1 videdwitha pairof output windings, the terminals 49 0' maybe connected to theterminals 53 and 54 of and henfcejthe speed of rotation of the shaft 19 is cor 1 resppndingly low the. ;switcli.,?39 ,is open, and .so that when" he t fibxtspeed iis;abo'ut .feet Iper minute or greaienttheaswitch 3,9Iis1closed, completing a circuit beand by providing thismotorpwith appropriate control circuits correlating its direction of rotation, and amount ofgqtatiqm with the ratesof rotation of theshafts 15 and :1 9 vunder dilferent operating speeds of travel. of the c grr gated: web,.the amount of adhesive applied iwill be regulated in the mannerpreviously. described. :111 Fig. 2,

taghorpeter generators 27 .and- 2,8 .of previously known 'tion 'and' -mode .of 1 operation :are. shown as driven andapprcpriate sproekets, from :thepower light be tween theleadf38 laridthelead 55-,which'is connected to theiglamp flandbetvteenthe-lead 3.8 and the lead 56 which is connected to;common terminal 63the ad- 47 ;may.::he lcouneet'ed to the terniinals-57 and .58"of the ond, winding, as indicated ir1';dotted lines. in Fig. 3,

hexterminailsl 51 .and 52 er the ratio meter.

generator 27 as shown in Fig. 3, or if the generator 28 is provided with two output windings, the terminals 51 and 52 may be connected'to the terminals 59 and 60 of the second winding, as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 3, and in the latter case, the tachometer 27 and the connections thereto may be omitted. The generator 28 has a pair of output terminals 61 and 62 which are connected to the automatic. control circuit hereinafter described.

The reversible motor has its common terminal 63 connected to one side of the A. C. source through the centrifugal switch 39, and its remaining terminals 64 and 65 are connected by means of leads 66 and 67 to the manually operable switches 68 and 69, to the Slow and Fast switches 70 and 71, and to the front contacts 72 and 73 of the relays 74 and 75. When the switch 41 is in the Man. position, the motor 25 may be operated by the switches 68 and 69 to cause rotation of the spindle 24 and, hence, change the ratio of speeds of the input and output shafts 15 and 19, operation of the switch 68 reducing or lowering the speed of shaft 19 and operation of the switch 69 increasing or raising speed of the output shaft 19.

The switches 70 and 71 are associated with the control box 76 used to control the main drive motor 77 and are closed when one or the other of the Slow and Fast buttons 178 and 179 are momentarily pressed to reduce or increase respectively the speed of the main drive motor 77. The switches 70 and 71 cause operation of the spindle 24 at the same time that the speed of the drive motor 77 is changed so that the ratio of speeds of the shafts 15 and 19 will be at approximately the desired value when the speed of the drive motor 77 reaches the desired speed. The switches 70 and 71 arc provided merely to reduce the delay in reaching the desired ratio when the speed of the drive motor 77 is changed and, hence, if desired, the switches 70 and 71 and the connections thereto may be omitted.

When the switch 41 is in the Auto. position, the coil 78 of the relay 74 is energized, and the coil 79 of the relay 75 is de-energized, and energizing circuit for the motor 25 is completed from the terminal 65 to the lead as follows: lead 67, contact 72, armature 80, leads 81 and 82, contact 83, armature 84, leads 85 and 86 and switch 41. Such energization of coil 78 when coil 79 is de-energized causes rotation of spindle 24 in a direction which increases the speed of the outputshaft 19. When the switch 41 is in the Auto. position and the coil 79 is energized, an energizing circuit for the motor 25 is completed from the terminal 64 to the lead 40 as follows: lead 66, contact 73, armature 84, leads 85 and, 86 and switch 41. Such energization of coil 79 causes operation of the motor 25 and rotation ofthe spindle 24 in a direction which lowers the speed of the output shaft 19.

Energization of the coils 78 and 79 is controlled by a relay 87 having a holding coil 88, an operating coil 89, a three position armature 90, and a pair of contacts 91 and 92. The relay 87 may, for example, be a relay of the. type known as a Sensitrol 'and sold by the Weston Electrical Instrument Corporation, Newark, New Jersey. The armature 90 of the relay 87 assumes a position dependent upon the magnitude and polarity of the energy supplied to the operating coil 89. When the coil 89 is de-energized or is supplied with only a small amount of energy, the armature 90 assumesa position intermediate to contacts 91 and 92, and when the coil 89 is supplied with a larger amount of energy, the armature 90 engages either the contact 91 or 92, depending upon the polarity of such energy. The holding coil 88 is providedto prevent chattering of the armature 90, and when the coil 88 is. energized, the armature 90 will'be held against the contact 91 or 92 which it has engaged because of energization of the coil 89. l

When the armature is in engagement with the contact 91, the coil 79 is energized by means of the following circuit: leads 36 and 93, arm 94 of an interruptor 95, contact 96, lead 97, coil 79, lead 98, contact 91, armature 90, leads 100 and 86, switch 41 and lead 40. When the armature 90 is in engagement with contact 92, the coil 78 is energized by means of the following circuit: leads 36 and 93, arm 94, contact 96, lead 101, coil 78, lead 102, contact 92, armature 90, leads 100 and 86, switch 41 and lead 40.

Interruptor 95 is a well known device employed to reduce hunting or over-control by the motor 25. The interruptor 95 comprises in addition to the arm 94 and contact 96, heretofore mentioned, a contact 103, a serrated wheel 104 and a driving motor 105. When the motor 105 is energized,it'rotates the wheel 104 causing the arm 94 which engages the wheel 104 to alternate between the contacts '96 and 103. The motor 105 is energized when either of the coils 78 and 79 is energized, the circuits being as follows: for energization of coil 79, leads 36 and 106, contact 107, armature 108, lead 109, contact 110, armature 111, lead 112, motor 105, leads 113 and 86, switch 41 and lead 40; for energization of coil 78, leads 36 and 114,'contact 115, armature 111, lead 112, motor 105, leads 113 and 86, switch 41 and lead 40. p

The coils 78 and 79 normally are de-energized, and their associated armatures are in the positions shown in Fig. 3. Therefore, the motor 105 normally is de-energized and the arm 94 is against the contact 96 permitting energization of the coils 78 or 79 by the relay 87. However, when either coil 78 or 79 is energized, the corresponding armature 111 or 108 engages its associated contact 115 or 107, causing energization of motor 105. Wheel 104 turns, causing its arm 94 to engage its contact 103, which completes an energizing circuit for the holding coil88 as follows: leads 36 and 93, arm 94, contact 103, leads 116 and 117, coil 88, leads 100 and 86, switch 41 and lead 40. Since movement of the wheel 104 disengages the arm 94 from the contact 96, the coil 78 or 79 which has been energized previously, becomes de-energized, interrupting the above described circuit for energization of motor 105, but because of the position of the arm 94, a new energizing circuit for the motor 105 is completed as follows: leads 36 and 93, arm 94, contact 103, lead 116, contact 118, armature 108, lead 109, contact 110, armature 111, lead 112, motor 105, leads 113 and 86, switch 41 and lead 40. Because of this new energizing circuit, the motor 105 continues its rota- .tion until the arm 94 again engages the contact 96. Al-

though engagement of the arm 94 with the contact 96 interrupts the last-mentioned circuit, the arm 94 may be cause to engage contact 96, either due to inertia of the interruptor or because the arm 94 engages the contact 55' 96 before the arm 94 becomes disengaged from the contact 103. 7

It will be apparent from the foregoing that when either of the coils 78 and 79 is energized by operation of the relay 87, the motor 25 will be energized and will operate the spindle 24 for a short period of time, determined by the speed of operation of the interruptor 95. The motor 25 will then become de-energized after the interruptor 95 has rotated its wheel 104 a small amount and will remain de-energized until the arm 94 again engages the contact 96. If at the time that the arm 94 re-engages the contact 96, the armature 90 has become disengaged from its associated contacts 91 and 92, the motor 25 will not be re-energized. However, if the armature 90 remains in contact with one of the contacts 91 and 92, or engages a different one of the contacts 91 and 92, the motor 25 will be re-energized when the arm 94 engages the contact 96, and the cycle above described will be repeated.

Energization of the-coil 89 of the relay 87 is controlled 7 by a circuit which combines the output voltages of the 76- generators 28 and 31 and a biasing circuit connected to of potentiometer 1'29 "7 the voltage regulator 3.7:. The regulator 31 is energized over an obvious circuit when the switch 11 in the Auto. psition; i i

The output of the voltage regulator 37 is'connected to any well known type rectifier-119 and may, for example, be a bridge rectifier employing selenium or copper oxide diodes. The output of the rectifier 119 in the polarity indicatedin Fig. 3 is connected to a voltage, divider 120, anintermediate point 121 of which is connected by' a lead 122 to one end of a potentiometer-123;; "One-end of the divider1 20 is connected to one end'of potentiometer 124 by a lead 125.- The ends of the potentiometer124 are connected by leads 126 and 1-27 to the terminals 61 and 62 of the generator 28. The adjustable arrn 128 of the potentiometer 124' istconnected to one end of a potentiometer 129, the latter potentiometer 129 being used to control the sensitivity of the apparatus and, hence, the response of the relay 87. The operating coil 89of'the relay 87 is connected by leads 130 and 131 to the adj iistable arm 132 and to one end of the potentiometer 1;2 ?,"adjustment of the arm 132 varying the amount of energy supplied to the operating coil 89; i 'The potentiometer 123 is connected in series, with a potentiometer 133 whose adjustable arm 134 is, connected to one end of the potentiometer 129-. The end of the potentiometer 133 remote from its junction 'point withthe' potentiometer 123 is connected by alead" 135 to terminal 45 ofthe generator 31 and adjustable arm 136 of the potentiometer 123 is connected by'a'lead' 137 to the terminal 46 of the tachometer 31.

It will be apparent from an'examination of; the connections of the potentiometers 123 and 133 thatfthese two otentiometers combine the bias voltage supplied by the divider 120 with the voltage supplied by theigenerator 31. Also, the potentiometer 129"113 developed thereacross a voltage whose magnitude and'polarity-depends upon the diiference between the combined bias voltage and output voltage of generator 31f'on the one hand and the output voltage of the generator 2&"bn' the other hand. The arm 136aifects, primarily, the nitude of the bias voltage added to the outputvo the generator 31 and: the setting of arm 134 det primarily, the amount of voltage applied to one potentiometer 129 The setting of arm 12 8 det the magnitude of the voltage applied to the'oppo to end of potentiometer ,129," t he voltage being "d'ri e er t r: 28 fi .'Qf-th ajrni, 12 the sensitivity of the relay Bflfahd o eri operating pop di'tions and is a factory'fixed settingf lt has eer rf;; unc l that the setting o f'the -arm niaiy be'us t control, the ratio of, the adhesive applicator roll speed to the web speed when the'latter speed is relatively low, e; g., 10.0. feet per minute. Also, it has been found that the setting of the arm 134 may be used to control 'this rat'io when the web speed is relatively high, e. g., 500 per-:niih 5 ute. Although there is some. interaction hetweenh he settings of the arms 134and 136, they are sufiicieni y in} pendentin efiect to permit control ofthe'ratio a'thigh web speed and lowweb speed respectively." i A The procedure for setting up the' various controls is as follows: I v I} V (1) With the switch 41 in the ,Gff position, arm 13% is moved until it is about ariseua? jg ofthe ldi ance between the junction p oint" of potenti meter 13 3 potentiometer123 and the ei'ld tion point, the arm 13 heing he,

2) The 9.1111 136'isn'1 eat time??? 1,23. nfis d t P ii i s et-, 1o ThB'aIITI d? midw y hetweentheends' i a d i fsnmtttq 1 ea ius ed until the- F fl ly 3813 han lfifiieet pe'r'minute i" weet; 4,1 is m re? to Au -matron;

rest.

.8 I (5). The arm 136 is adjusted slowly until the ratio meter 47 indicatesthei desired ratio with low web speeds}; (6) The speed of. the main drive motor 77- isadjusted to its normal high production speed, t 500 feet perminute, and the arm 134 is adjusted slowly until the (:8) I-ff'desired, the sensitivity arm 132 may be ad;

justedt to obtain higher sensitivity. However, theesensitivity shouldi'be increasedonly untilhunting occurs and then the sensitivity should bereducedf 5 i i It will b e'appa'rentfrom the above that if it is desired to change'the' low speed and high speed ratios towhich the controls are'set, the steps set forth above should be repeatedfor the new ratios; Q l

The following example will illustrate the operation of the control circuit. Let it be assumed that the voltages applied to the ends of'potentiometer 129 must he substantiallyeq'u'al in magnitude and opposite "in' polarity for equilibfiinn, and let it also e assumed that the gen} erators28 afld 31 provide equal output voltages for the samespeed'ofr'jotatiori." Suppose that at, the time the web speed islOO feet per minute, approximately '5; volts are appliedto the end of po't entiometeri129 connected to the arm' 1-28 by the generator'28. When the'speed of the shaft'1-9 is 8 0% of the speed of shaft 15, and the arm 134 is properly adjusted asset forth abet e, the gen erator 31 will apply 4 volts' to the oppps ite efnd of the potentiometerllfl i Accordingly, to obtain balance con; ditions 6requilib'riumfthe amiss, mustb'e set to supply approximatelyone volt from the bias 'S lUZe. j

When the web speed is increased, the generator 28 will supply a higher output voltage, and let it'be assumed that the new voltage is approximately 10 volts. Under these conditions, the generator will be, required to supply 9 volts to the opposite end of potentiometer 129 because the voltage supplied from the hiassource is fixed and does not vary with speed. Aceordingly,"the output shaft '19 must, under the high speed conditions, be rotating at a speed which is approximately offthe'speed of the shaft '15. Thusjiwithoutj any'readjustm entof the arms 128, 132, 134 and 136, the ratio of the speed of the output shaft 19 to the speed of the inputshaft 15 will change between predeterminedlimits, whenthe speed of the drive motor Wisyaried. i I" In summary, except for details of operation heretofore described,lthe operation of the automatic ratiocontrolling circuits is as follows:

(11 When the portion, of the output voltage of the generatorjiil combined with the bias voltage applied to i one end of the potentiometer 129 is substantially equal to the portion of; theoutput voltage of the generator 28 applied to'., the p ntiom'eten 129, .the armature '90 remains in its intermediate position and themotor 25 is at (2,),When the portion of the output voltage of the generator 28 applied to the potentiometer 129 is greater than the portion of'thecombined voltages applied to the PQfi91 if 22, t armature 90;,engages the contact 92, energizing the coil 78 and causing operation of the motor 25 and hence, rotation ofthespindlel24, in a direetion which increases the speed of rotation of the out put shaftlQ'. j

(3,) 'When the portion of the combi ed Voltages applied to thepotentiometer 129 is greater than the portiqh of the output' vdltage or the generatorf23 applied to poftentiometer 129, armature 98 engages; contact 91, energizing the coil 79 and causing operation of the motor'25 and hence, rotation of the spindle 24, in a direction which reduces the speed of the output shaft 19.

Accordingly, the ratio of the speed of theoutput shaft 19 to the speed of the input shaft 15 will be maintained automatically at a value determined by the settings of the arms 128, 134 and 136.

While the invention has been disclosed as applied to a paper board making machine of the above described specific form, and using a regulating system as specifically described above, it should be understood that changes may be made therein without departing from the invention in its broader aspects, within the scope of the appended claims. 4

What is claimed is 1. Adhesive applying apparatus of the character described for the bonding of the peaks of a corrugated web to a facing web, including an adhesive applicator roll, power driven means for progressively moving a web past said applicator roll, a variable speed transmission having its power input member driven in definite speed relation to said power driven means and its power output member connected in driving relation to said applicator roll, and means responsive to variations in speed of said power driven means, for adjusting said variable speed transmissition to decrease the relative surface speed of said applicator roll as compared to the speed of travel of said web, upon decrease in speed of said power driven means, and increase the relative surface speed of said applicator 10 roll as compared to the Speed of travel of said web, upon increase in speed of said power driven means.

2. Adhesive applying apparatus of the character described for the bonding of the peaks of a corrugated web to a facing web, including an adhesive applicator roll, power driven means for progressively moving a web past said applicator roll, a variable speed transmission having its power input member driven in definite speed relation to said power driven means and its power output member connected in driving relation to said applicator roll, and

means responsive to variations in speed of said power driven means, for adjusting said variable speed transmission to decrease the relative surface speed of said applicator roll as compared to the speed of travel of said web, upon decrease in speed of said power driven means, and increase the relative surface speed of said applicator roll as compared to the speed of travel of said web, upon increase in speed of said power driven means, said means responsive to variations in speed of said power driven means, having devices affording adjustment of the ratio of applicator roll surface speed to web speed at a given speed in the high speed range of web speed, and also at a given speed in the low speed range of web speed.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,016,085 Fawkes et al. Oct. 1, 1935, 2,482,627 Langston Sept. 20, 1949

Patent Citations
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US3082734 *Dec 8, 1958Mar 26, 1963Deering Milliken Res CorpApparatus for coating a moving web
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Classifications
U.S. Classification118/674, 118/210, 156/470, 156/356
International ClassificationB31F1/28, B31F1/20
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/2818
European ClassificationB31F1/28D