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Publication numberUS2827901 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1958
Filing dateFeb 15, 1955
Priority dateFeb 15, 1955
Publication numberUS 2827901 A, US 2827901A, US-A-2827901, US2827901 A, US2827901A
InventorsGeorge W Jones
Original AssigneeGeorge W Jones
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for oxygenating blood
US 2827901 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 1958 e. w. JONES MEANS FOR OXYGENATING BLOOD Filed Feb. 15. 1955 INVENTOR.

GEORGE w. JONES ATTORNEY United States Pat This invention relates to bloodoxy'genators and'jlia's for its primary object the provision of adevice" of this character which will permit the rapid oxygenation of blood.

Many types of apparatus for the oxygenation of blood have been suggested heretofore. Prior apparatus, how- 6 2,827,901 patented Mar. 25,1958

its

2, A further objectof this invention consists in providing a method of fusing a gaswith" a" fluid' exposing the greatest amount of the fluid surface possible to a gas.

This is accomplished by changing afluid liquid into a fluid gaseous state, or into" small drops;

ever, has been found to be crude, bulky, or complex and to be generally unsatisfactory. The art' has long desired a simple apparatus that would serve to oxygenate human blood as a part of auxiliary heartand" lungmechanisrns.

It is also an object ofthisinvention to"oxygenate'bloodthat might be pumped to and from it bymean's of the human heart. This invention would do the work of the human lung's if for somepathological reason the oxygen could not pass through the lung tissue to the blood stream.

It could do the work of the lungs if for some reason:

device that would be exceedingly effective in oxygenat ing a limited amount of blood in such a way that brain, and other cells; may-be keptalive until medical orsurgical help could be obtainedfon the victim of an accident. Such an accident might be due to asphyxia in which the oxygen system may be 'restored'if certainvital cells are kept alive with a small and continuous" supply of oxygen.

A further object of this invention is to produce a device that will be effective in oxygenating blood quickly, such as would be required to keep the brain and other vital cells of a human being alive, in the event of a cardiac accident which might cause standstill, or fibrillation. In many such accidents the victim can be saved if it is possible to supply oxygen to vital cells until the heart is brought out of standstill, or fibrillation, and made to function again.

Still a further object of this invention is to make a small, compact oxygenator that can be packed and carried in a handbag, such as is used by practicing medical physicians, and used as an emergency means for oxygenating the blood of the victim of an accident, until the victim can be transported to a hospital or a surgical operating room. Many accidents of the type requiring oxygenation of the blood, do not happen where life saving and surgical equipment is handy for emergency use. These accident victims are generally found in houses, along the banks of streams or lakes, in industrial plants, out in the fields, or along streets and highways. The physician who can carry one of these oxygenators in his medical-bag, along with an auxiliary heart, will be in a position to save many lives that otherwise would not live to reach the emergency operating room.

Another important object of this invention is to provide a mechanism of few parts which may be readily assembled and disassembled in such a manner that all parts may be easily sterilized.

Other objects and advantages of the invention is" accomplished by means of such structure and relative an rangements of parts as will be apparent with the following description when taken in connection withthe accompanying drawings; in which,

Fig. l is a sectional view taken along the lines 1-1 of Fig. 2, and 11 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 2 is a front elevation showing an embodiment of this improved device compactly assembled. b

b Fig. 3 is a cross section taken alongfthe line" 3-3 of Fig; 1

Referring'to" the drawings, a glass bottle or flask 15 serves as the chamber for the oxygenating process. The container" 15 is supported in an inverted vertical position, with" theinlet' and outlet tubes entering and leaving through its' mouth. A cap 17 is afiixed to the mouth ofithe containerf 15 bysuch means that theinternal or external pressures will not causeit" to be forced away from the opening: The neck 16 of the container 15 25 is long. and narrow so the least possible amount of blood 7' is required to'prev'ent'f air bubbles from entering" the opening: oi tube 8, which is fsituated slightly above cap 17L Thefluid 7 in the xn'eck" 16" of the container 15 and chamber S is maintained at a predetermined level by the control valve 9. The" tubes 3, 13,'and stmaybe removed for cleaning, repairing, sterilizing; or adjusting by removing the cap 17, al1 three tubescome out of chamber 5 as cap 17 is withdrawn.

Referring to Fig. 1 the blood entering at numeral 1 is usually treated with an anticoagulant and as it flows through the control valve 2 the" desired pressure" is obtained. Fromthecontrol 'va lve' ltheblood flows through the horizontal tube 3 until it enters the" container 15 through the cap 17 at a" sharp angle" as it turns fiomthe horizontal direction to a vertical direction and continues upward through tube 3 until it reachestlieoriflce" 4 where it is discharged'into chamber 5" in the" term" of droplets. As the small drops of blood are sprayed into chamber 5 the oxygen in the chamber combines with the hemoglobin of the blood, oxygenating it.

After the drops of blood pick up the oxygen in chambar 5 they fall down along the sides 6 and flow from there into the fluid 7. The fluid 7 flows through the opening of tube 8, through tube 8 until it reaches the control valve 9, where its volume and pressure are controlled. From the control valve 9 the fluid leaves the oxygenating device by means of tube 10. As the blood is expelled from tube 10 it contains the oxygen picked up in chamber 5 and is ready to be returned to the circulatory system of a human being.

The oxygen, or other gases, to be used in chamber 5 is sent through horizontal tube 11 under the desired pressure. This pressure is controlled by the control valve 12. The oxygen is carried from the control valve 12 to tube 13, which takes it in a horizontal plane until it enters the container 15 through the cap 17 where it makes a sharp angle to a vertical direction and continues up through tube 13 to almost the top of chamber 5, then it is expelled through the opening 14 into the chamber. The oxygen combines with the drops of blood and is carried down the sides of chamber 5 by gravity until it reaches 6 where it flows into the fluid 7 and becomes a part of that fluid. Gravity, or the pressure of the oxygen in chamber 5, forces the oxygen carrying blood vertically downward towards the opening of tube 8, which is found a small distance above cap 17. As the blood enters the opening of tube 8 it continues downward through this tube until'after it passes through cap 17, then it makes a sharp angle in a horizontal plane to the control valve 9, thence through the control valve 9 to the tube 10, where it is distributed asoxygenated blood.

From the foregoing description it will be readily seen that a devicehas been produced "as substantially fulfills the objects of the invention as set forth herein.

While this specification sets forth" in detail the pres- V cut and preferred construction of the device, still in practice such deviations from such may be resorted to as do not form a departure from the spirit of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Having thus describedthis' inventionwhat is claimed as new and useful andto secure Letters Patent is:

1.'A blood 'oxygenator comprising a vessel having a bulbulous portion; an elongated, relatively narrow neck aeergeor r r per end of'said tube; a second tube for discharging oxygenated blood from the vessel, said second tube projecting upwardly from the' exterior of the Vessehthro'ugh the closure member and terminating at a point within the neck portion below said bulbulous portion; a third tube for carrying an oxygenating gas into the vessel, said third tube extending from the exterior of the vessel through the closure member and terminating at a point in the bulbulous portion between the top and bottom thereof,

' and a control valve connected to each of said tubes.

2. A bloodoxygenator as defined by claim 1 in which the closure member is a removable cap.

3., A blood oxygenator as defined by claim 1 in which the third tube terminates above the first tube.

4. A gas-liquid contact device comprising a vessel hav- 2 ing a bulbulous portion; an elongated narrow neck portion at a point between its top and bottom; means for subdividing liquid escaping from the upper end of said tube; a second tube projecting upwardly from the exterior of the vessel, through the closure member and terminating at a point within the neck portion below said bulbulous portion; a third tube extending from the exterior of the vessel through the closure member and terminating at a point in the bulbulous portion between the top and bottom thereof and a control valve connected to each of said tubes. 7 V V 5. A gas-liquid contact device comprising a vessel having a bulbulous portion; an elongated narrow. neck portion extending downwardly from and in communication with the interior. of said portioma closure member for the neck portion; a first tube for carrying into the vessel liquid under pressure, said tube extending from the exterior of the vessel, through the closure member and neck portion, and terminating within the bulbulous portion at a point between its top and bottom; means for subdividingliquid escaping from the upper end of said tube; a second tube for discharging gas treated liquid fromthe vessel, said second tube projecting upwardly from the exterior of the vessel, through the closure member and terminating at a point within the neck portion below said bulbulous portion; a third tube for carrying treating gas into the vessel, said third tube extending from k the exterior ofv the vessel through the closure member and terminating at a point in the bulbulous portion between the top and bottom thereof and a control valve connected to each of said tubes.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 163 cited.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,827,901 March 25, 1958 George W. Jones It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 3, lines 16, 23, 29 33 40 and 45, and column 4:, lines 6, 8, 12, 18, 25, and 28, r bulbul d bulb or ous rea 0us-.

Signed and sealed this 28th day of April 1959.

Attest= T. B. MORROW, ROBERT C. WATSON, Attestz'ng Offiaer. Oonwm'ssz'oner of Patents.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2406207 *Oct 4, 1944Aug 20, 1946John P DesmetBlood treating device
US2612160 *Aug 11, 1949Sep 30, 1952Barr Courtland HIntravenous solution dispensing apparatus
US2642867 *Aug 16, 1952Jun 23, 1953Livingston Herman HApparatus for the transfusion of blood
US2723660 *Jul 22, 1954Nov 15, 1955Greenberg Emanuel MArtificial uterus
FR852671A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3142296 *May 31, 1962Jul 28, 1964Jack W LoveBlood oxygenator
US3247851 *Mar 13, 1962Apr 26, 1966Seibert Margaretta JeanApparatus for applying liquids to the body
US3291463 *Dec 26, 1963Dec 13, 1966Kartridg Pak CoApparatus for charging a liquid with a gas
US3547591 *Oct 16, 1968Dec 15, 1970Torres Jose CBubble film oxygenator
US4769241 *Sep 23, 1986Sep 6, 1988Alpha Therapeutic CorporationApparatus and process for oxygenation of liquid state dissolved oxygen-carrying formulation
US4919895 *Jun 18, 1987Apr 24, 1990Alpha Therapeutic CorporationApparatus for oxygenation of liquid state dissolved oxygen-carrying formulation
US4968483 *Nov 4, 1987Nov 6, 1990Quarzlampenfabrik Dr.-Ing. Felix W. Muller Gmbh & Co. KgApparatus for the production of oxygenated blood
US5366696 *Jan 7, 1993Nov 22, 19941077075 Ontario Inc.Oxygenation apparatus for oxygenating a carrier liquid by spraying
US5612226 *Oct 3, 1995Mar 18, 1997Lifetech CorporationGas/liquid contact apparatus
US5871459 *Apr 7, 1997Feb 16, 1999Mueller; HansApparatus for treating blood
US6248087Jan 27, 1999Jun 19, 2001Therox, Inc.Apparatus for generalized extracorporeal support
US6607698Aug 15, 1997Aug 19, 2003Therox, Inc.Method for generalized extracorporeal support
US6746417Dec 19, 2000Jun 8, 2004Therox IncApparatus for generalized extracorporeal support
US7008535Aug 4, 2000Mar 7, 2006Wayne State UniversityApparatus for oxygenating wastewater
US7294278Nov 4, 2005Nov 13, 2007Wayne State UniversityMethod for oxygenating wastewater
US7820102 *Mar 28, 2003Oct 26, 2010Therox, Inc.Disposable cartridge for producing gas-enriched fluids
WO2001049404A1 *Jan 2, 2001Jul 12, 2001Fbc Technologies IncWastewater oxygenation system
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/45, 261/115, 128/DIG.300
International ClassificationA61M1/32
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/03, A61M1/32
European ClassificationA61M1/32