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Publication numberUS2828023 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1958
Filing dateApr 25, 1955
Priority dateApr 25, 1955
Publication numberUS 2828023 A, US 2828023A, US-A-2828023, US2828023 A, US2828023A
InventorsJames Berra, Mcginn James B
Original AssigneeAmerican Viscose Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Single beam racks
US 2828023 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 41958 J. BERRA ET AL 2,828,023

SINGLE BEAM RACKS Filed April 25', 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 A` a v l a /a la A Fig?! United States Patent 2,828,023 SINGLE. BEAM RACKS James Berra, Haddon Heights, N. J., and .lames B.

McGinn, Philadelphia, Pa., assignors to American Viscose Corporation, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Application April 25,1955, Serial No. 503,662

12 claims. (Cl. 2112-15) vThe `present inventionA relates to shipping or storing racks for a single yarn iilled spool o'r beam.

In the past, yarn beams or spools having layers of continuous yarn end s would thereupon have generally been shipped in beam racks which are designed to accommodate a plurality of Iyarn beams. A filled yarn beam weighs approximately 1,000 lbs. When several of these beams `are placed within a multiple beam containenthe whole assembly weighs several thousand pounds. This weight factor reduces themaneuverability of the 'racks which complicates loading and unloading operations when `shipped to customer converters'who 'use ythe 4yarn in the knitting 'or weavingfof fabrics. The converter also nds it difcult to move the iilled beam racks to desired locations for storage or use on his premises. In addition, the converter or customer may order only one yarn 'filled beam, in which event, a single beam will be AshippedV in a large rack 'designed to contain aplurality of beams. Both the yarn beam shipper and converter have long desired lighter and more maneuverable beam racks which can be `easily handled.

It is therefore one object of our invention to provide compact, novel and improved shipping or storing 'racks which willfaccommodate a single yarnlled beam and which can be easily maneuvered.

It is a-further object of our invention to provide novel and improved single yarn beam racks having novel beam locking or anchoring devices for locking a beam lirmly in place within the rack. Y

lt is still a further object of our invention to provide novel and improved single yarn beam racks which have stacking or tiering guides Iwhereby one beam rack may be easily positioned atop another rack for storing or shipping.

Still another object of oui' invention is to provide novel and improved 'yarn beam Vracks having novel and improved speciiic locking devices for locking in place an upper beam rack positioned atop a lower rack.

`Other objects and advantages will become more apparent from a study of the following description Land drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective of a single yarn beam rack;

Figure'Z is an enlarged detail of the beam stops incorpotrated with the rack of Figure 1; v y

Figure 3 is an end view of a modification of the rack ofmFigure l; n Q l d n n Figure 4 is an enlarged detail of the locking means for holding in place a beam rack as shown in `Figure 4 atop a similar rack. n n

Figure 5 is an end vview of another `modification of the rack 'of Figure l; and l Figure 6 is an enlarged detail of thebeam locking means for the rack of Figure `5.

Briefly, our invention comprises a rectangular metal frame or rack which has locking means for` holding a yarn beam rmly in 'place within the rackt Tiering or stacking guides vare aliixed to ,the beam racks or frames whereby one beam rack may be easily stacked atop an- ICC other rack. With certain 'of therack modilication's, additional locking means are provided for holding in yplace one rack positioned atop another. v A

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to Figure 1 wherein is shown a preferred embodiment of our rack for supporting a flangedyarn beam, the 'metal Arack or frame A for supporting a lled yarn vbean'i or spoel 1 comprises vertical corner legs 4, 4, upper and lower longitudinal supports 6, 6 welded 'toth'e legs directly and also connected with the legs through struts 6', and 'ripper 'an lower transverse end supports 8, Sfwelded to the legs 4, 4. Cross braces 9, 9 extend between and are affixed to the lower longitudinal supports 6, 6 to strengthen the frame or rack A., Beam supporting tracks 1'0, 10 also extendbejtween and are aixed to the lower longitudinal supports adjacent the ends of the supports. The tracks 10, -10 sup,

port the beam flanges 1', 1 of the yarn beam 1. Checks 11 which have arcuate shaped faces are bolted to the back i end of the tracks 10, 10 and back up or further support the beam flanges 1.', 1 vto correctly position the beam within the rack A. `To lock the beam -1 `in position within the rack A a turnbuckle assembly 12 is pivotally secured y. to the chock end of each track 10,10. The turnbucklesj 12 are positioned over each end ofthe beam shaft 14 `and when the bolts 15 are tightened against the ends of shaft 14, vthe beam is firmly lo'cke'd in plae within the rack A.

An important feature of our invention is that two `or three of the racks A may be stacked one atop the other to conserve Vspace when shipping or storing the racks. As seen in Figure l of the drawing, rack stacking guides or pipes 16, 16 are weldedl to each leg 4, 4 of the rackA A the bottom rack as will be explained.` When in position i the legs 4, 4 of the upper or second rack will rest upon the corner plates 118, 18 ofthe bottomV rack. A pair of skid legs 27, 27 'for the rack A are welded to the bottom of the longitudinal and transverse frame members 6, 6 and 8, 8 -and to vthe rack legs 4, 4 forming a corner with each leg 4. Whenl stacking one rack A atop a bottom rack A, the corners formed by the skid legs r27, 27 cooperate or contact the guides at one or theA other end of the rack A to .guide or center, as the top rack 'is being flowered, the contacted corners 18, 18 of legs 4, 4 of the 'rack being lowered onto the corner vplates Y18, 18 of the bottom rack A.l T he corners formed by the skid legs at Athe opposite end o f the upper rack will necessarily follow into .position the bottom of the longitudinal members 6, 6, of the upper frame A, t snugly against the complementary angularly descending end portions vof the upper longitudinal finembers 6, 6 of the bottom -fra'me A to longitudinally lock the racks together. The guides 16, 16 also actto prevent transverse `and vlongitudinal movement between the 4'stacked racks.

As seen in Figures 1 and 2, beam stops 30, 30 'extend through the vertical face of tracks 10, 10 nea'r the front or vopen end of the tracks. The beam stops prevent the beam from rolling oif the front end of the tracks 10, -10 when the turnbuckle locking assemblies 12 are removed from the ends of the beam shaft 14. As seen invFigure 4v2 of the drawings, the stop `assembly 30 comprises a slotted and preferably cylindrical Vshaped casing Y33 closed iat 4one end. The open end of the casing is threaded into a look nut 35 which nut is welded in place over a hole through the vertical face of track 10. A spring 37 and a latch b'olt38 are positioned within the casing 33 with the free end of the spring contacting the end of the casing. A pull pin 43 extends through slot 45 of casing 33 and is threaded into a hole in the latch bolt 38. As seen in FigureV 2, the slot 45 extends downwardly at its outer end whereby the pull pin 43 may be seated after the operator has pulled the pin backward to draw the latch bolt 38 back into the casing. When the pin 43 is in its seated psition,[the free end of the bolt is flush with the vertical face of the track thus permitting the beam 1 to be rolled along the tracks 10, 10 to be removed from the rack A. The beam 1 is preferably loaded and unloaded through the front of the rack A.

A modification of the rack A of Figures Vl and 2 of the drawings is shown in Figures 3 and 4 of the drawings. The frame structure of the modified rack B is similar to that of rack A. A turnbuckle locking assemb ly 12 is pivotally secured to the vertical face of each track 10 at the center of Vthe track. The turnbuckle assemblies 12 fit over the ends of the beam shaft 14 to firmly lock the beam 1 in position within the rack B. A pair of identical chocks 50, 50 which support the beam anges 1 are also aixed to each track 10, 10 at positions whereby they will retain the beam 1 at the center of the rack A. With this arrangement, the beam 1 is firmly locked in place withinV the rack B. lThe beaml 1 in this instance is loaded `and unloaded through the top of the rack B.

A'stacking or tiering Vguide in the form of an angle plate 55 is afiixed to each of the two upper transverse rack end members 8, 8. The guides 55 are diagonally opposed to one another being affixed to opposite ends of the transverse members 8, 8. Braces 57, 57 extend downwardly from the transverse frame members 8, 8, at an angle and are Welded directly to the bottom edge of the corner leg 4. When one of the racks B is lowered atop a'bottom rack, the sloped outer surface of the angle plates 55 guide the braces 57, 57, so that the corner legs 4, 4 of the top rack B will rest directly upon the lower rack struts 59, 59 which are somewhat similar to the struts 6 of the Yrack of Figure l.

To lock an upper beam rack B in placewhen positioned atop a similar bottom beam rack, the racks have a pair of stacking or locking devices 60 (Figures 3 and 4). One locking device 60 is alixed to each upper transverse rack end member 8 at oppositeends of theY transverse members so that the devices 60 are diagonally opposed. As seen more clearly in Figure 4 of the drawing, a latch bolt 70 is slidingly mounted within a supporting frame 73 afiixed to the upper transverse rack end member 8. A spring 75 is positioned around the bolt 70 and is confined between the back vertical plate 76 of frame 73 and a collar 78 secured to the bolt '70. The forward movement of the collar 78 is restricted by a stop member 79 through which the bolt 70 passes and which is Welded within the frame 73. The end of the |bolt extending beyond the end plate 76 of frame 73 terminates in an offset or release handle H which, when pulled by the operator will draw the bolt 70 back within the frame 73. A stop pin 82 afiixed to the inside of the transverse rack end member 8 retains the bolt in its withdrawn position when the handle H is swung in position behind the pin.

As seen in Figures 3 and 4, the braces 57, 57 extending downwardly from the transverse rack end members 8, 8 have holes 85, 85 drilled therethrough so that when one rack is stacked atop another, the latch bolt Vwhen released will extend through the hole 85 of the brace 57 afiixedvfto the top frame. The compressed spring 75 forces the latch bolt 70 forward Iwhen the handle H is pivoted off of the stop or retaining pin 82. Y With this arrangement, an upper beam rack B may be firmly locked in place atop a bottom rack B.

A further modification of the rack A is shown in Figures 5 and 6 of the drawing. As seen therein, the rack T 4 C has longitudinal members 90, which are bracket shaped, and are welded to the top vot the frame legs 92, 92. The beam supporting track 10 and chock 8 arrangement are the same as that for the rack shown in Figure l ofthe drawings. A beam locking assembly 96 affixed at each end of the rack C locks the beam 1 in place within the rack. As seen more clearly in Figure 6 of the drawings, the locking assembly 96 comprises a metal plate 98 which is pivotally mounted at 99 to each upper transverse rack end member 100. The free end olf the plate 98 is of arcuate shape whereby the plate rests upon and conforms with the curvature of the beam flange 1. The plate 98 has a hole 98 drilled therethrough. A block 102 having a holeV 102 cut therethrough is welded to the top` surface of the plate 98 at the free end of the plate so that the holes 102 and 98' are in alignment. A threaded lock bolt 104 operates Within a casing 106 which is pivotally mounted at 107 to the fron-t end of the transverse rack member 100. The free end of the bolt 104 terminates in a short stud 109 of a smaller diameter than the threaded portion of the bolt. A nut 108 is threaded over the free end of the bolt 104 and welded in place thereupon. The nut 108 has holes Vdrilled through its opposite tfaces which holes are in alignment with drilled holes in the bolt 104. A turn rod is inserted through the nut 108 and the bolt 104 to rotate the bolt. To wedge or tighten the plate 98 against the beam flange, the turn rod 110 is rotated in a clockwise direction whereupon the nut 108 is pressed or wedged against the block 102 and plate 98 to firmly impress the platte upon the beam flange 1 to lock the beam in place within the rack C. The stud 109 passes into the holes 102' and 98 of the block 102 and plate 98. This operation is repeated with the locking device 96 at the opposite end of the rack C. The beam 1 is loaded and removed from the rack C through the front of the rack. With this arrangement, the beam is locked in place with the diametrically opposed chocks and locking devices applying pressure to the forward and back pontions of the beam flanges.

The tiering, stacking and locking devices used with this modification are similar to those used in the rack modification shown in Figures 3 and 4 of the drawings. The release handle H' is slightly modified, and the stop pin 82' is positioned in the upright position rather than the horizontal position. A locking device 60 is mounted within each upper bracket shaped longitudinal rack members 90 at opposite extreme ends whereby the devices 60 are diagonally opposed on the rack C. The latch bolts 70 cooperate with holes 112 in the corner legs (Figure 5) to lock in place an upper rack C positioned atop a lower rack C. When the two racks are stacked, the legs 92, 92 of the top rack are supported bythe bracket shaped longitudinal rack members 100,100 of the bottom rack C.

It is to be understood that additional modifications of the beam racks disclosed above may be made without departing from-the scope or spiritrof my invention as defined in the appended claims.

We claim:

l. A shipping and storing Vrack for a anged Yyarn beam or spool comprising corner legs, transverse members connecting the legs, longitudinal members connecting the legs, a pair of transversely extending, beam supporting tracks aixed vto and extending between the opposed longitudinal members, means which cooperate with the rack for retaining the beam in place within the rack, and beam stacking guides affixed to the rack which guides are out of vertical alignment with the corner legs to provide slanting surfaces for contacting and guiding the `corner legs of an upper rack into position atop a lower rack.

2. A shipping and storing rack for a anged yarn beam or spool comprising corner legs, upper and lower `transverse members connecting the legs, upper and lower longitudinal mmbers connecting the legs, a pair of transversely extending, beam supporting tracks aixed to and extending between the opposed bottom longitudinal members, a beam positioning chock affixed to one end of each beam supporting track, means afllxed to the tracks for locking the beam in place within the rack, and stacking guides aixed to the rack which guides are out of vertical alignment with the corner legs to provide slanting surfaces for contacting and guiding the corner legs of an upper rack into position atop a lower rack.

3. A shipping and storing ,rack for a anged yarn beam or spool according to claim 2 wherein the stacking'guides comprise pipes which extend above the top longitudinal and transverse rack members which pipes are aixed to the rack corner legs and which extend angularly inward toward the rack center.

4. A shipping and storing rack for a flanged yarn beam or spool comprising corner legs, upper and lower transverse members connecting the legs, upper and lower longitudinal members connecting the legs, a pair of transversely extending beam supporting tracks aixed to and extending between the bottom longitudinal members, a beam positioning chock aixed to one end of each beam supporting track, means aiixed to the tracks for locking the beam in place within the rack, stacking guides affixed to the rack legs tor guiding an upper rack into position atop a lower rack, and a beam'stop connected with each track to prevent fthe beam from rolling in the tracks when the locking means are removed from the beam.

5. A shipping and storing rack for a flanged yarn beam or spool according to claim 4 wherein the beam stop comprises a spring-loaded latch bolt assembly affixed to each track which bolt, when released, crosses the path defined by the track members.

6. A shipping and storing rack or frame for a anged yarn beam or spool comprising corner legs, upper and lower transverse members connecting the legs, upper and lower longitudinal members connecting the legs, a pair of transversely extending beam supporting tracks aixed to and extending between the bottom longitudinal members, a pair of opposed chocks secured to each track at intermediate locations of each track for supporting the flanges of the yarn beam or spool, a leg brace aflxed to the bottom of each rack leg, said braces being also aixed to and extending downwardly from the bottom transverse rack members, a tiering latch bolt receiving hole in each brace, and a turnbuckle assembly pivotally secured to the center portion of each track, the free end of each turnbuckle assembly being adapted for positioning over one end of a shaft for the beam for locking the beam in place within the rack.

7. A shipping and storing rack for a flanged yarn beam or spool according to claim 6 comprising a spring-loaded tiering or stacking latch bolt locking assembly axed to the top transverse rack members which bolt, when released, passes through a latch bolt receiving hole in a brace leg of a top rack to firmly lock the top rack in position.

8. A shipping and storing rack for a anged yarn beam or spool according to claim 6 comprising stacking guides affixed to the top transverse rack members which guides are out of vertical alignment with the legs of -the frame to provide slanting surfaces guiding the corner legs of an upper rack into position atop a lower rack.

9. A shipping and storing rack for a flanged yarn beam or spool according to claim 8 wherein the stacking guides comprise angle plates.

l0. A shipping and storing rack for a anged yarn beam or spool comprising corner legs, upper and lower transverse members connecting -the legs, upper and lower longitudinal members connecting fthe legs, a pair of tracks aflixed to and extending between the bottom longitudinal4 members, a beam positioning chock aixed to the back end of each beam supporting track, and beam locking means so ailxed to each upper transverse rack member whereby locking pressure is applied against a point on the forward portion of each flange of the beam, when positioned within the rack, which points are diametrically opposed to those points at which the cheeks contact the beam anges.

1l. A shipping and storing rack for a flanged yarn beam or spool according to claim l0 wherein the beam locking means comprises a metal platte pivotally secured at and to the center ott a top transverse rack member, the free end of the plate being of arcuate shape whereby the plate rests upon and conforms to the line of curvature of the beam flange, a drilled out block welded to the top or convex surface of the plate adjacent the free end thereof, a threaded casing pivotally secured to an end of the upper transverse member which casing may be swung in position over the free end olf the plate, a lock bolt threaded within the casing which bolt at its free end terminates in a guide stud of smaller diameter than the threaded portion, a nut threaded and welded in place on the end portion of the bolt, aligned drilled holes through the nut faces and the threaded portion of the lock bolt, and a turn rod extending through the drilled holes whereby when the rod is rotated and the guide stud is inserted within the drilled out hole in the block the nut clamps or presses the block and plate against the beam ange to firmly lock the beam in position Within the rack.

12. A shipping and storing rack for a anged yarn beam or spool according to claim 10 comprising -a tiering or stacking latch bolt locking assembly mounted upon the top longitudinal rack members for firmly locking in place an upper rack stacked atop a lower rack.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,355,486 Longenecker Oct. 12, 1920 2,262,794 Burbank et al. Nov. 18, 1941 2,334,335 Lathrop Nov. 16, 1943 2,525,551 Keith Oct. 10, 1950 2,593,472 McGinn Apr. 22, 1952 2,632,567 Richtmyer Mar. 24, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1355486 *Jan 16, 1920Oct 12, 1920 Cobneb-stay fob beceptacles
US2262794 *May 6, 1939Nov 18, 1941Western Electric CoArticle handling and storing apparatus
US2334335 *Apr 30, 1942Nov 16, 1943American Enka CorpLoading beam
US2525551 *Nov 17, 1948Oct 10, 1950 Locking mechanism fob beam backs
US2593472 *Apr 29, 1947Apr 22, 1952American Viscose CorpSteel shipping package for section beams
US2632567 *Apr 9, 1948Mar 24, 1953Eastman Kodak CoRack for beams
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2954197 *Jun 30, 1958Sep 27, 1960Equipment Mfg IncBeam rack
US2963414 *Jul 22, 1957Dec 6, 1960Petrolite CorpElectric emulsion treater
US3061255 *Mar 15, 1960Oct 30, 1962Acf Ind IncCoil pallet
US3087118 *Mar 30, 1959Apr 23, 1963Atr Electronics IncCombination antenna and radio support for vehicles
US3144838 *Jun 7, 1961Aug 18, 1964Pullman IncContainer support device for a railway car
US3225706 *Nov 16, 1962Dec 28, 1965Du PontBeam racks for railroad cars
US3240167 *Feb 27, 1961Mar 15, 1966Paragon Bridge & Steel CompanyRailway carrier for automotive vehicles
US3291318 *Feb 24, 1965Dec 13, 1966United States Steel CorpApparatus for storing hoisting equipment
US3730552 *Dec 23, 1971May 1, 1973 Load anchoring device
US4257523 *Apr 27, 1979Mar 24, 1981Italrame S.P.A.Device for storing, transporting, lifting and utilizing wire rod
US5022546 *Jul 1, 1988Jun 11, 1991Edelhoff M.S.T.S. GmbhContainer for the storage and transport of, in particular, bulk materials such as construction debris, rubbish, industrial waste and the like
US5044846 *Feb 28, 1990Sep 3, 1991Westinghouse Electric Corp.Compliant tiedown system for securing a cask for transporting radioactive materials to a vehicle
US5076745 *Sep 28, 1990Dec 31, 1991George KleinBulkhead and rail transport system
US5137405 *Oct 23, 1991Aug 11, 1992George KleinBulkhead and rail transport system
US5833289 *Jul 24, 1996Nov 10, 1998Brolin; Walter G.Modular storage system for stacking cylindrical loads
WO1998003407A1 *Jul 24, 1997Jan 29, 1998Brolin Walter GModular storage system for stacking cylindrical loads
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/85.5, 410/48, 206/512, 206/511
International ClassificationA47B81/00, B65H49/38, B65H49/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B81/007, B65H49/38
European ClassificationA47B81/00E, B65H49/38
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 15, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: BALBOA INSURANCE COMPANY C/O THE PAUL REVERE EQUIT
Owner name: JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY JOHN HA
Owner name: KELLOGG CREDIT CORPORATION A DE CORP.
Free format text: AGREEMENT WHEREBY SAID HELLER AND RAYONIER RELEASES ALL MORTGAGES AND SECURITY INTERESTS HELD BY AVTEX ON APRIL 28, 1978, AND JAN. 11, 1979, RESPECTIVELY AND ASSIGNS ITS ENTIRE INTEREST IN SAID MORT-AGAGE AGREEMENT TO ASSIGNEE;ASSIGNORS:WALTER E. HELLER & COMPANY, INC. A NY CORP.;ITT RAYONIER INCORPORATED, A DE CORP.;AVTEX FIBERS INC., A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003959/0350
Effective date: 19800326
Owner name: NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 501 BOYL
Owner name: PAUL REVERE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY THE C/O THE PAU
Free format text: AS SECURITY FOR INDEBTEDNESS RECITED ASSIGNOR GRANTS , BARGAINS, MORTGAGES, PLEDGES, SELLS AND CREATES A SECURITY INTEREST WITH A LIEN UNDER SAID PATENTS, SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS RECITED.;ASSIGNOR:AVTEX FIBERS INC. A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003959/0219
Effective date: 19810301
Owner name: PROVIDENT ALLIANCE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY C/O THE
Owner name: WALTER E. HELLER & COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF DEL.
Free format text: AGREEMENT WHEREBY AETNA RELEASES AVTEX FROM ALL MORTAGES AND SECURITY INTERESTS IN SAID INVENTIONS AS OF JANUARY 11,1979, AND ASSIGNS TO ASSIGNEE THE ENTIRE INTEREST IN SAID MORTAGE AGREEMENT TO ASSIGNEE;ASSIGNORS:AETNA BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., A CORP. OF N.Y.;AVTEX FIBERS, INC, A CORP. OF NY;KELLOGG CREDIT CORP., A CORP. OF DEL.;REEL/FRAME:003959/0250
Owner name: WESTERN AND SOUTHERN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY THE C/