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Publication numberUS2829645 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1958
Filing dateMar 21, 1955
Priority dateMar 21, 1955
Publication numberUS 2829645 A, US 2829645A, US-A-2829645, US2829645 A, US2829645A
InventorsMatteson Clarence D
Original AssigneeMatteson Clarence D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydraulic dental syringe
US 2829645 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 8, 1958 c. D. MATTESON 2,329,645

HYDRAULIC DENTAL SYRINGE Filed March 21, 1955 i 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 55 /02. 3 h 34 I0! [03 1:1 6. I m2 34 INVENTOR.

39 CLARENCE 0. MATTESO/V 4 TTOR/VE r c. D. MATTESON 2,829,645

HYDRAULIC DENTAL SYRINGE A ril s, 1958 Filed March 21, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY April 1958 c. D. MATTESON 2,829,645

HYDRAULIC DENTAL SYRINGE Filed March 21, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN V EN TOR.

38 0L4 RE/VGE D. MATTESO/V ATTORNEY United States Patent 20 Claims. (Cl. 128-229) This invention relates to animproved hydraulic dental syringe particularly well adapted for use by patients.

Since food left under the gum and around the teeth is now believed to .be the principal cause of pyorrhea and a requisite for the incidence of tooth decay, some dentists have advocated the use of a syringe after meals for the removal of residual food. The hand syringe heretofore in use consists of a rubber bulb fitted with a metal tip having an orifice of a diameter of one and a half millimeters (.0591) inch-or even larger. It is operated by squeezing the air from the bulb and placing the tip in water. The pressure on the bulb is then released, and the bulb is allowed to fill with water. The tip is then placed in the mouth and the bulb emptied under hand pressure, while at the same time the column of water is directed along and under the gum. However, it requires approximately eight bulbs full of water to reasonably cleanse a full complement of teeth. The operation takes about two minutes to perform if the operator has a rubber bulb of the right consistency, can produce eight pounds of pressure, and at the same time can accurately direct the water column. Of this time, approximately twenty-four secends are required for the actual syringing, with the remainder of the two minutes being consumed by filling and re-filling the bulb. The demand for power, dexterity and time is more or less uniform. The ability of a patient to meet these demands is highly variable and uncertain. Few patients possess the power, dexterity and patience to follow this exacting and irksome regimen.

My invention is designed to render the cleansing of the teeth and gums after meals a delightful necessity by making it possible for people of every age to effectively remove the residual food with a minimum of time, effort and skill. This invention provides a reliable aid in the maintenance of a constantly clean mouth and thus supp'lies j 50 a positive curb to dental diseases due to filth, namely, py-

square inch. The pressure is controlled by a special valve and complex. A full complement of teeth can be thus thoroughly cleansed in ten seconds 'of'syringing by'th'e application of these devices and using only forty-five pounds of pressure at the tip. This feat can be accom-- plished even though deep pyorrhea pockets are present.

"ice

sure regulation by means incorporated in the special valve and coupling for this purpose. 7

Three problems must be met where equipment is to be used by a group such as a family, etc. One problem concerns sanitation; another has to do with time; while a third is concerned with the possibility of right and lefthanded persons having to use the devices. The first two of these problems are taken care of admirably by the easily attached and detached coupler-tip unit of a design that also solves the sanitary problem. Each person will have his own unit. Right and left-handed individuals my instantly rotate the valve to a position for comfortable therefore been considered in the designing of the devices to meet this problem. Size has been kept at a minimum consonant with the needs for a necessary minimum flow of water to the male coupler and for a maximum flow to the basin or sink for ordinary needs. Anticipating the possibility of its use while traveling, the device has been kept purposely small for convenient transport and has been designed for easy and rapid installation.

Syringes are most beneficial when they can be used immediately after each meal, and the best results and the fastest and easiest operation are therefore obtained from a demountable syringe that can be attached to a universal type of fitting on a water faucet. Consequently one of the main problems has been to provide a coupling which is sufiiciently simple to connect and disconnect. If this problem could be solved and a universal connection made standard, and public installations provided, everybody could carry asyringe with him and use it after each meal; hence, the solution of this problem is one object of the present invention.

Even before the necessary faucet connections have become universal, it is obviously desirable that each member of a family have his own dental syringe which nobody else uses, and since this means that no syringe can be permanently connected to the faucet, it has been a problem to provide an easily attachable and easily detachable type of coupling that will encourage rather than discourage a frequent use of the syringe. The provision of such a coupling is another object of the invention.

Another problem that has heretofore prevented the wide use of hydraulic dental syringes, stems from the fact that different people require a different water pressure in the stream that issues from the syringe, high pressures being undesirable for small children and for adult beginners and those who have abnormal gum conditions. It is therefore another object of this invention to provide an easily operable, foolproof pressure regulating means in the devices.

a As stated before, important sanitary problems must also be met, if wide use of dental syrings is to be achieved. Both the syringe itself and the tube connecting it to the i; faucet must be easy to keep clean and the faucet itself No discomfort is caused by these high pressures where.

the gum is normal or has been previously freed of mechanical irritants such as tarter, rough crowns, overhanging fillings, etc. The gum tissue of the novice may not comfortably tolerate the pressure necessary for a thorough cleansing. Children may enjoy greater pressures as they grow older. Tender spots around the gum may require instant reduction in the pressure. The pressurein water systems in tall buildings, in different parts of communities and in different cities may vary. considerably. This invention meets all of these requirements fonpresmustnot be contaminated by any flow draining back into it from the syringe after use. The present invention in cludes among its objects the solution to this sanitation problem.

Another problem solved by this invention concerns the provision of automatic stop valves and drainage valves that prevent water from accidentally drenching theuser or flowing in the wrong direction. A feature of these valves is their relatively simple construction and foolproof operation.

The present invention has solved these problms and achieved its objects by providing a hydraulic dental syringe having a frictional valve-coupler combination where attachment and detachment are accomplished merely by pushing the coupler elements together by a rotary thrust motion or taking them apart by a rotary pull motion, without any latch or latch-release mechanisms. 'The coupler combination comprises mated conical surfaces which require no catches, threads, or. other. members to insure fiow without leakage. vThepressure of the fluid passing through the syringe is regulatedto a large extent by selecting any one of several orifices available .in oneof the coupler members. The invention also includes ball stop valves and novel meansfor unseatnig these valves.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the followingdescription of some preferred embodiments.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a view in elevation and in section of a hydraulic dental syringe. embodying the principles. of. this invention. The syringe nozzle and the tube connecting thev syringe to the male coupler have been brokenin order to. conserve space. I

Fig. 2.is.a view generallysimilar toFighl on ..a.somewhat reducedscale with some parts shown inroundinstead of in section and with the apparatus shown .in its uncoupled position.

Fig. .3 is a view in elevation on a further reducedscale of the coupled assembly shown in-Fig. 1 and also-showing the relation to the hot water andcold water pipes. Once again the syringe nozzle and connecting tube have been broken in order to conserve space.

Fig. 4 is a view in elevation and in section of the valve element, shown on the same scale as Fig. 1' with-the male coupler disconnected and withdrawn and with the valve rotated into the position it normally is' kept when the syringe is notbeing used, so that the faucet can be used- 'Fig. 7 is a view in elevation of the valve handle lookingat it from .theinside, which would be from the right in Figs. l.4.

Fig. 8 is a view in elevation of the valve bodywith' the handle removed, looking from the left ofFigs. l to-4.

'Fig. 9 is a viewin perspective of the moving valve body looking from the handle end, with the handle detached.

Fig. 10 is a view ,ofthe valveelement of Fig. 9 looking from the opposite directionfromtheorifice-plate end,.'and with a portion of the .handlemount broken off to conserve space.

Fig. 11 isan enlarged-view-in perspective of the ballvalve-unseating.memberof the male coupler.

Figs. 12716 .are viewsin elevation-andlin section" of modified forms of male couplerelements.

Fig. 17 is a view inelevation and in section .ofthe moving valve body showing a. modified formof orificecontrolling means.

The main elements of. the hydraulic .dentalsyringe," as shown in Figs. 1 to 3, comprisethe'faucet-A on which the valve Bis installed, amalecoupler Cafittingxinto a female. couplenD-at one endof: the valve.B,aand -a;rubber tubefE connectinguthesrnale coupler- C t-o a: syringe nozzle F.

The faucet A The faucet A (seeFigs. 2 and3) is preferably-of the to obtain the optimum water temperature at the syringe-F.

Some regulation of the water pressuremay also-"be chtained by manipulation ofthe hotand coldwater'fauc'et handles 23, 24, butadditional.regulationmeans arel provided: in the valve-'Bdtself. .The unio1L20 terminates in a spout 25, towhichris ipreferab'ly welded-or -brazda permanent insert 26 having exterior threads 27 that receive the valve B (see Fig. 1).

The valve B The valve member B (see Figs. 1-4) is adapted to fit on the faucet A in a leak-tight connection therewith, determines whether the water flows directly down or to the syringe F, and regulates the pressure of water passing to the syringe F. The valve B may be attached to a faucet by any type of device, such as snap-on, etc. As shown in 'the drawings, the valve Bs hollow housing 30 may beprovided at its upper-end with a threaded collar 31 '(either integral with the housing 30 or a separate member secured thereto), which-engages the threads 27 of the faucet A and compresses a gasket 32 against the lower end of the insert 26, so as to prevent leaks between the faucet A and valve B at this point.

.The interiorcof the. housing. 30 provides-a crossingfor two perpendicular. channels thercthrough-.-a horizontal passage 33 and a vertical passage 34. A-valve body 35 fits. rotatably in: the passage 33 and'opens and closes the vertical passage 34, according to its rotational position. When the vertical passage 34' is open, water can pass straight through the housing 30, through a diametric passage36 through. the body 35 and the bottom through the normal outlet .37. An anti-splash attachment or shampoo spray attachment 38 maybe threaded on a nipple 39 .on the housing 30. The outlet 37 is the one.

through which the water passes'when the faucet is being usedfor washing'ones hands and face, filling. a drinking glass, and soon, but it is not used when employing the syringe F.

The horizontal passage 33 is tapered to. receive and mate-with the frusto-conicalperiphery 40 of the valve body 35. Its smaller-diameter end is partly closed by an adjustable end-thrust bearing 41, threaded into the housing 30, against which abuts a shoulder 42 of the smaller-diameter end of the body 35. .The bearing .41

cooperates with the associated parts: to offset the hydraulic pressureon the end when the. springeis being used. Otherwise the valve-would jam .in the taper and be very difficult to turn. If the adjustment is accurate there'is little or no leakage of water. A flattened shaft-like handle -receiving portion 43 ofthe valve-body 35 projects out through a small-diameter bore 43a in theendthrust bearing 41. One flat face 44 of itheportion 43 maybe substantially smooth,.while .theotherfiatface 45 is preferably provided with-a small depression 46. A

'mentof the valve .35 to.approximatelyr90. body 35' can thus readily be turned between the. fully on t 00 position (for 'zstraight-through vmovement of the water handle --47 is'provided with 'a spring-'48 pressed locking member-49 that. .fits in the depression '46,. the. spring 48 being-meld .in'rbyvacollar-58. The :handle 47 isalso provided with i an openinga59. havinge a flat interior face SO/that engages Ithexflat face-44 and having .a'projecting stop member 51. The stop .wmernberISI is .adaptedxto limitrotation of the handle'47 between two? stops 52, 53 at each end of an annular segmental relief .54 '(see Fig. 8) on the housing 30, thereby limiting-themovfihe vaive through its passage 36 towthe'normal-soutlet 37) and the fully off"position' for the normal outlet--which is the on .position for the syringe F.

In addition to thedirect diametric passage 36 which is used when the valve is to sendwater straightdown through the normal faucet. outlet 37, the valve body 85 is "provided with a bore or passage 55-which enters the A body 35 atan angle on 'the'frusto-conical periphery 4G,

J through this passage 55.

Pressure regulation is provided by an orifice plate 60 which is secured by a screw 61 to the axial center of the valve face 56 and which carries a plurality of different-sized orifices 62, 63, 64, and 65. The plate 60 can be rotated by a finger nail or orange wood stick without having to loosen the screw 61. The larger the orifice used, the greater the pressure will be through the syringe F, the largest orifice 62 being about the same diameter as the passage 55, while the smallest orifice 65 is considerably smaller and therefore greatly reduces the water pressure beyond it. These openings help to make the pressures in the syringe normal where the pressure in the faucet is usually higher than sixty pounds, at it might be in certain communities or buildings. The higher the pressure above 60 pounds the more difiicult it is to turn the valve in the housing if that should be desired, and the more snugly the coupler C must be seated in D to keep it in position.

Thus, when the valve body 35 is turned by the handle 47 against the stop 52, the diametric passage 55 directly connects the faucet A to the outlet 37, while rotation of the valve 35 through 90--When the handle stop 51 strikes the stop 53will send a full head of water through the angular bore 55 and out through one selected orifice 62, 63, 64, 65 in the orifice plate 60.

The end member 70 and female coupler D Adjacent the orifice plate 60 of the valve body 35, the housing 30 is provided with interior threads 66 adapted to receive and engage exterior threads 67 on an end member 70 that contains the female coupler D. The member 70 has a knurled outer surface 68 that facilitates removal without tools for adjustment of the orifice plate 60, and for cleaning, greasing, and other servicing of the interior, while a gasket 69, retained in position by a collar 84, prevents leaks when the member 70 is threaded in place.

The end member 70 is provided with an annular cylindrical recess 71 in which is seated a helical spring 72 that bears against the orifice plate 60 and urges the valve 35 against the end-thrust bearing 41 so as to prevent leakages of fluid out through the handle side of the valve 35. Silicone grease may be used to lubricate the valve body 35 in the housing 30.

The end member 70 also has a central axial recess 73 which leads via an opening 74 into a conical bore 75 which comes in from the outer end 76 of the member 70. A conical valve seat 77 is provided at the bottom of the recess 73, which is of larger diameter than the inner. end of the conical bore 75. A ball valve 80 normally closes ofi the opening 74, being urged to this position by a very light conical spring 81, the small end of which engages the ball 80 while the larger end engages an annular recess 82 in the annular wall 83. Since the spring 81 is very light, only a slight pressure is required to move the ball valve 80 off its seat 77, but when that pressure is withdrawn, the spring 81, together with the water pressure, if any water is passing through the passage 55, act to close the ball valve 80 immediately. Therefore, no water will pass out through the opening 74. except when the ball valve 80 is purposely pushed away from its seat 77.

The male coupler C The male coupler member C (see Figs. 1 and 2) has a conical portion 85 that cooperates with the conical passage 75 which acts as the receptacle of the female coupler D. The conical surfaces 85 and 75. conform exactly, and the metal-tometal frictional contact .over the area and the exact mating of the parts serve to hold the male coupler C in place by a light rotary-thrust move ment. Removal is just as simple and is done merely by a rotary-pull movement on the male coupler C. Friction between the parts is easily maintained by occasionally washing the coupler C with detergent and then rinsing it.

The body 86 of the male coupler C is provided with a main hollow portion 87 and a side T portion 88. An axial passage 90 leads through the conical coupler portion 85 to the portion 87, where it is stepped at 91 into a larger-diameter axial portion 92, which continues completely through the body portion 87 and is threaded at its end 93. A transverse passage 95 through the T 88 joins the axial passage 92 a short distance away from the step 91 and leads out to the rubber tube E. The outer surface of the T 88 is preferably roughened at 96 for securely holding the rubber tube E, as is the end of the syringe F.

-At the outer end of the axial passage 90 a ball displacement member 100 is provided. The member 100 preferably comprises a small, thin strip of spring material which gives very little resistance to water flow, formed to shape and inserted in the passage 90, with a portion projecting from the end of the coupler C. The strip 100 (see Fig. 11) is generally curved to coincide with the arcuate shape of the-axial passage 90 in which it extends for about 180, and is provided with outwardly bent flanges 101 approximately opposite each other whose inner edges 102 engage the outer end of the male coupler C and prevent the member 100 from being pushed inside the axial passage 90. My invention also takes advantage of sufiicient spring tension on the sides of the passage 90 for retention in place of the flanges 101, even if the device is dropped on the lavatory. The projecting flanges 101 are preferably somewhat rounded at their outer ends to offer less interference with water flow into 90, the two rounded prongs serving on installation to force the ball valve away from its seat 77 when the two conical sections 75, mate.

For sanitary reasons it is advisable to prevent water from draining back through the syringe F and rubber tube E into the coupler passage and the valve B. I prefer, therefore, to provide a ball valve 105 in the axial passage 90. The valve 105 is normally urged against the step 91 by a very light spring 106, which permits the ball 105 to be pushed away from step 91 by water under pressure entering from the passage 90. The water pressure, built up by the small opening through the tip, thrusts the ball 105 against the end 109 of a shell 108, as shown in solid lines in Fig. 1, thus forcing the water through the transverse passage When the water is turned oil at the valves 23 and 24, or when the valve 35 is rotated to the open position, or when the coupler C is detached from D, the spring 106' urges the ball valve against the step 91 (see the dotted lines in Fig. 1), thus preventingthe return flow from entering the passage 90 but the water is then permitted to escape rapidly through a passage 107 of the shell 108, or more slowly through the syringe tip F.

The same parts that constitute this drain also serve to provide a fine adjustment of the pressure of the water through the syringe F, because the location of the end 109 of the shell 108 determines how much of the transverse passage 95 is closed off by the ball 105 when the device is in use. This closure is varied by how far into the coupler the drain tube 108 is threaded into the threads 93. Preferably a lock nut 110 is provided to secure the adjustable shell 108 in any position which may be selected.

Alternative forms of male couplers Several alternative forms of male couplers are shown in Figs. 12 to 16. All of these have the conical coupling portion 85 with an axial passage 90 leading through the conical couplerportion, and-a transverse passage 95 that connects with the tube'E, of this axial passage. How ever, none of these modified forms have the drain member 108.

In Fig. 12 the axial passage 90 connects directly to the transverse passage 95 and there is no adjustment at all.

In the modification shown in Fig. 13 I provide a snuglyasses fitted threadedmember-lll which regu-lates the size of the opening 112 connecting the axial and transverse passages 90, 95 and thereby'regulates the pressure-therethrough. This adjustment member 111 comprises a threaded andslot-ended nut 113 with a projecting pressure regulating portion 114.

In the Fig. 14 modification, a spring 115 urges an adjustable. threaded pressure-regulating member 116 outwardly and serves as a lock to prevent loss of adjustment. The spring115 is seated against a closed end 117. Adjustment of pressure is made with a screwdriver through the passage 99.

In the modification shown in Fig. 15 the axial passage 90 is connected directly'to the transverse passage 95. Water pressure is regulated by-a snug-1y fitted, threaded, and slot-ended nut 121. Leakage is prevented by a closure nut 119'and gasket 120.

In'Fig. 16 the modification is comprised of a snugly threaded member 122-Witha knurled or octagon head 125 for easy finger manipulation. A threaded and-slotted (forscrew driver) gasket retainer 123 holds a gasket 124 snugly in place around the end of the projecting regulating portion 126 of the member 122, to prevent leakage and to assist in preventing loss of adjustment by its friction. If desired, a lock nut may be installed to aid in holding the gasket retainer 123 in place.

In Fig. 17 is illustrated a modified type of orifice controlling means. Instead of employing the orifice plate 60, the device may be-accompanied with the series of threaded slot ended nuts 130, each of which has a different diameter bore 131, graduated from fine to coarse. The outlet end of the passage 55 isthreaded 'at 132 to receive any one of these nuts 130. According to the pressure desired, the proper nut 130' ischosen, andthe operation is substantially identical to that where the orifice plate Gil'is used.

Operation In operation, the handle 47 is used to operate the valve member 35 and turn it either to the normal faucet position for straight-through passage of water through the passage 36 or to the syringe position where water will pass through the passage 55 and through one of the selected orifices 62, 63, 64, 65, into the space between the end member 70 and the valve body 35. The water will not pass out from there unless the male coupler C has been inserted into the conical passa e 75 to push the ball 8 off its seat 77, because unless this is done,-the Water pressure augments the pressure of the spring 81 to keep the valve 8!) seated. When the coupling C is in place in the coupling D, water will pass around the ball 30, through the axial passage 90 and will be'directed by the ball 105 into the transverse passage 95 of the coupler C, from whence it passes through the rubber hose E into'the syringe nozzle F. When the coupler C is disconnected (accidently, or by merely withdrawing it with a rotary motion from the conical passage 75) the flow of water from the valve B is immediately stopped by the ball valve 80. At the same time, the syringe nozzle F and its tube E will drain through either the syringe nozzle F or preferably through the larger and therefore faster drain opening 107, or both, the ball valve 105 closing off the opening leading to the coupler connection.

Should the temperature need adjusting during the act of syringing, the valve 35. is instantly rotated to the. open position to allow all of the water to flow through 37. The water is rapidly tempered by adjusting either one of the valves 23 or 24 and is instantly forced back into the syringe by turning 35 to the closed position.

When the pressure is released on the' gasket of the hot water valve 24 by turning the valve on, there is a. very marked tendency for the gasket, if'made of rubber, to gradually swell and thus' restrict the flow of hot water. If the fiow is already restricted to control pressure, the expanding gasket will 'cut the flow of hot 'water sufficiently'to cause the temperature and pressure to drop. By operating on a substantial flow of water the influence of the'expanding gasket is not noticeable even to teeth that are very sensitive to heat changes. If there is too much pressure on the syringe when working with a full head of water, this can be instantly released by rotating 35 to allow a sufiicient flow of water through 37 to'reducc the pressure to the point desired. This arrangement obviates the necessity of going through a complicated timewasting experimental procedure of adjusting for temperature and pressure by having to manipulate the faucet valves 23 and 24. This arrangement of control is also useful in syriuging over sore spots on the gum.

To those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, many changes in construction and widely differing embodiments and applications of the invention will suggest themselves without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The disclosures and the descriptionherein'are purely illustrative and are not intended to be many sense limiting.

I claim:

1. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment toa water faucet or the like, including in combination: a hollow housing adapted to be secured to said faucet; a valve body mounted rotatably in said housing, said body having a generally diametrical passage for utilizing the combination as a faucet, and an isolated second passage extending in from its periphery and out through one end; a closure member for said housing opposite said end, said closure member having an inner face, an outer face, and a conical passage extending through it from its outer face; "valve means adjacent said inner face normally adapted to close off said conical passage; a separable male 1 coupler member having a projecting tube with a frustoconical outer periphery matching in shape said conical passage and adapted to fit snugly therein in a metal-to-- metal contact; a displacement member projecting from theend of said tube, so as to unseat said valve means when said coupler is inserted in said conical passage; and a syringe nozzle connected to said male coupler.

2. The syringe of claim 1 wherein there is means for restricting the diameter of a portion of said second passage.

3. The syringe of claim 1 wherein said valve means is a ball.

4. The syringe of claim 1 wherein said valve bodys diametric passage is adapted for alignment, when being used, with an'anti-splash baflie secured to said housing.

5. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet or the like, including in combination:

a female coupler adapted to be secured to said faucet and having'a conical passage extending in from its outer side; valve means on the inner side of said passage normally urged to a position where it closes off said conical recess; a separable male coupler member having a projecting tube with a frusto-conical outer periphery matching in shape said conical passage and adapted to fit snugly therein in a metal-to-metal contact, this snug fit constituting the sole holding means for retaining them together; a displacement member projecting from the end of said tube, so as to unseat said valve means when said coupler is inserted in said conical passage; and a syringe nozzle connected to said male coupler.

6. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet or the like, including in combination: a female coupler adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a conical passage extending in from its outer side; valve means on the inner side of said passage normally urged to a position where it closes off said conical recess;'a separable male coupler member having a projecting' tube with a frusto-conical outer periphery matching in shape said conical passage and adapted to fit snugly therein in a metal-to-metal contact; a displacement member'projecting from the end of said tube, so as to unseat said-valve mcanswvhen'said coupler is inserted insaid conical passage; and a'syringe nozzle connected tosa'id male coupler, the passage through the projecting tube in said male coupler opening into a perpendicular passage connected to said syringe nozzle, flow regulating means being provided adjacent the intersection of said passages.

7. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet or the like, including in combination: a female coupler adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a conical passage extending in from its outer side; valve means on the inner side of said passage normally urged to a position where it closes off said conical recess; a separable male coupler member comprising a T having a projecting tube with a frusto-conical outer periphery matching in shape said conical passage and adapt ed to fit snugly therein in a meta1-to-metal contact, the passage through the projecting tube opening at an annular shoulder into a co-axial passage of larger diameter and having a right angle passage means intermediate said shoulder and the end of said coupler opposite said coupler tube; a displacement member projecting from the end of said tube, so as to unseat said valve means when said coupler is inserted in said conical passage; and a syringe nozzle connected to said male coupler at said right angle passage means, flow regulating means being provided adjacent the connection to said syringe nozzle.

8. The syringe of claim 7 wherein said male coupler has a passage of reduced diameter co-axial with said tube and said larger diameter passage and connected therewith by a second shoulder on the opposite side of the right angle connection from the aforesaid shoulder and wherein there is a ball in said larger diameter passage and spring means normally urging said ball against the aforesaid shoulder to close the passage between said syringe and i said tube, said ball being urgeable by water against said second shoulder.

9. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet or the like, including in combination: a female coupler adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a conical passage extending in from'its outer side; valve means on the inner side of said passage normally urged to a position where it closes off said conical recess; a separable male coupler member comprising a body member having a projecting tube with a frustoconical outer periphery matching in shape said conical passage and adapted to fit snugly therein in a metal-tometal contact and having a straight-through axial passage leading thcrethrough, the part through said tube being of narrower diameter than a second larger passage and meeting it at an annular shoulder, the outer end of saidsecond passage being interiorly threaded; a hollow threaded member threaded into the outer end of said passage, and providing a third passage of reduced size; a. fourth passage entering said second passage at right angles between the inner end of said threaded member and said shoulder; a ball in said second passage between said shoulder and the inner end of said threaded member; spring means normally urging said ball toward said shoulder but overcome by water pressure to permit the ball to seat against said inner end of said threaded member and close off said' third passage, the size of opening between said'second and fourth passages then being determined by the position of said ball which is regulatable by the position of said threaded member; a displacement member projectingtfrom the end of said tube, so as to unseat said valve means when said coupler is insertedin said conical passage; and

a syringe nozzle connected to said male coupler fourth.

passage.

10. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet or the like, including ..in combination: afemale coupler adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a conical passage extending in from its outer side; valve means on the inner side of said passage normally urged to a position where it closes off said conical recess; a separable male coupler member having a projecting tube with a frusto-conical outer periphery match- 1O ing in shape said conical passage and adapted to fit snugly therein in a metal-to-metal contact; a displacement mem' ber projecting from the end of said tube, so as to unseat said valve means when said coupler is inserted in said conical passage; and a syringe nozzle connected to said male coupler, said male coupling member including threaded means partially interposed between theopening through said tube and the opening leading to said syringe nozzle, for regulating flow to said syringe.

11. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet or the like, including in combination: a hollow housing adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a vertical passage therethrough and a hori zontal passage substantially closed at one end; a valve body rotatably mounted in said horizontal passage, said body having a first through passage adapted for alignment with said vertical passage and a second passage leading in from its periphery and out through its end at the open end of said horizontal passage; a closure member engag ing the open end of said housing horizontal passage, said closure member having an inner face, an outer face, and a conical recess extending through from its outer face; valve means adjacent said inner face adapted to close off said conical recess; yieldable means urging said valve means normally into its closed position; a separable male coupler member having a projecting tube with a frustoconical outer periphery matching in shape said conical recess and adapted to fit snugly therein in a metal-to-metal contact; a syringe nozzle connected to said tube; and a displacement member projecting from the end of said tube, so as to unseat said valve means when said coupler is inserted in said conical recess.

12. The syringe of claim 11 wherein said valve means is a ball.

13. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet and including in combination: a hollow housing adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a vertical open-end passage therethrough and a horizontal open-endtpassage therethrough; a valve body adapted to fit rotatably in said horizontal passage and having an annular bearing face at one end with a stern extending therebeyond, the other end having a substantially radial face, said body having a diametric passage therethrough, adapted for alignment with such vertical passage in one rotational position, and a second passage leading from an opening through the axial periphery substantially midway between the diametric passage openings and leading to an outlet through said radial face; means to regulate the orifice size at said outlet; thrust bearing means in contact with said annular bearing face and closingone end of said housing horizontal passage; handle means secured to said stemfor rotatingsaid valve body; a closure mem ber engaging the opposite end of said housing horizontal passage against leaking, said closure member having a central conical opening leading in axially from the outer side thereof; first spring means under compression between said valve body and said closure member and adapted to urge said valve body against said thrust bearing means;

valve means between said closure member and said valve' unseatLsaid valve means when said coupler is insertedtin said conicalv recess.

14, The syringe of claim 13, wherein .said means to regulate'orifice size comprises a circular disc plate having.

aplurality of openings therethrough of different sizes, with their centers at a uniform radius from the center of said disc plate, said disc plate being centrally mounted onthe end of said valve body through which said second maze-gees 1'1 passage leaves, so that onegof said openings-eta time can overlie said second passage outlet.

15. The'syringe of claim 13 wherein said means to regulate orifice size comprises hollow tubular means adapted to be threaded into said second passage.

16. A-hydraulic dentalsyringe adapted for attachment to a water faucet and including incombination: a hollow housing adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a vertical open-end passage therethrough and a horizontal open-end passage therethrough; a valve body adapted'to fit rotatably invsaid horizontal passage and having an annular bearing face at one end with a stem extending therebeyond, the other endhaving a substantially radial face, said body having a diametric passage-therethrough, and a second passage leading'from an opening through the axial periphery substantially midway between ,the diametric passage openings and leading to an outlet through said radialface; means to regulate the orificesize atjsaid outlet; thrust bearing means in contact-with said annular bearing face and closing one end of said housing horizontal passage; handle means secured to said stem for rotating said valve body; a closure member engaging the opposite end of said housing horizontal passageagainst leaking, said closure member having a central axial recess leading from the inner side thereofand opposite saidyalve body, and a central conical recess leading in axially from the outer side thereof and intersecting said central axial recess; first spring means undercompression between said valve bodyand said closure member and adapted to urge said valve body against said thrust bearing meanspa ball in saidrcentral axial recess adapted to close theopening leading to said conical recess; second springmeans anchored inv said annular wall and urging said ball normally into its closed position; a separable male coupler member having a projecting tube with a frusto-conical outer periphery matching in shape said'conical recess and adaptedrto fit snugly therein in a metal-to-metalcontact; a syringe nozzle connected to said coupler member; and a ball displacement member in said tube, substantially thinner than the opening through said tube and projecting from the end thereof, so as to unseat said ball when'said coupler is inserted in said conical recess.

17. A hydraulic dental syringe adapted to be attached to a water faucet and including in combination: a hollow housing adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a vertical passage therethrough and a horizontal passage therethrough, both passages being open at. both ends,-said horizontal passage having a frusto-conical wall; .a' valve body having a frusto-conical axial periphery adapted to fit "rotatably in said horizontal passage and having :an annular radial bearing face at its smaller diameter end, witha reduced-diameter axial stem extending out there beyond,'the larger diameter end havinga substantially. flat radial face, said body having a diametric passage'therethrough adapted for alignment with said vertical passage forpassage of water directly therethrough, when said body is in one rotational position, and a second passage leading from an opening through said peripherysubstantially midway between the diametric passage openings and leading out through said radial face,.said secondpassage being adapted to conduct water from said faucet when said body is in a rotational position..-approximately 90 from its previously mentioned rotational positioman orifice plate rotatably mounted on said radial face and having a series of openings therethrough capable of alignment, one at a time, with the opening leading out from said second passage; an annular thrust bearing in contact with said annular bearing face and closing the smaller-diameter end of said housing horizontalpassage againstv leakage; handle means secured to saidistemifor rotating said valve body; a closure memberengagingjthe larger-diameter end of'said. housing horizontal passage, said closure member having a central axial recess'and a concentric annular axial recess therein, both-leadingfrorn the inner. sidethereof and facing said orifice iplate'and defining anannular wallbet-ween them said closure mem her also having La-central coniealrecess leading in axially from the :outer sidethereof and intersecting said central axial recess, said central axial recess having a'conical seat adjacent the intersection; a first coil spring in said annular recess under compression between said orifice plate and said closure member and adapted to urge said valve body against said thrust bearing; a ball in said central axial recess adapted to close the opening connecting the recess to said conical recess; a second coil spring anchored in said'annular wall and urging said ball normally into its closed position; a separable male coupler member havinga projecting tube with a frusto-conical outer periphery'matchingin. shape said conical recess and adapted to fitsnugly therein in a metal-to-mctal contact; a'syringe nozzle connectedv to said male coupler member; and'aball displacement member substantially thinner than the opening through said tube and projecting from-the end thereof, soias to unseatsaid ball when said coupler is insertedinisaid conical recess so that water can flow from said faucetthrough said valve body, when said body is in a proper rotational position, to said male coupler and said syringe.

18. A valve-coupling unit for use in connection with a hydraulic dental syringe and a water faucet, including in combination: a hollow housing adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a vertical passage therethrough with ananti-splashattachment on its lower end and a horizontal passage therethrough, said horizontal passage having a frusto-conical .wall; a valve body having a frustoconical axial periphery adapted to fitirotatably in said horizontal passage and having an annular radial bearing face at said smaller-diameter end, with a reduced'diameter axial stem extending out therebeyond the other end being a substantially flat radial face, said body having a first passage therethrough adapted for alignment with said vertical passage for passage of water directly therethrough, and-a second passage adapted for alignment with the upper end of. said vertical passage and leading from an opening through said periphery to said radial face; means to regulate the orifice of said second passage adjacent :sai-d radial face; thrust bearing means in contact with said annular bearing face and closing one end of said housing horizontal passage; handle means securedzto said stem for rotating said valve body; a closure member engaging the opposite end of said housinghorizontal passage, said closure member having a central axial recess on the side facing'said orifice plate and a center conical recess leading in axially from the outer side thereof and intersecting said central axial recess; means under compressionibetween said valve body and said closure member'and adapted to urge said valve body against said thrust bearing; a ball in said central .axial recess adaptedzto close it off from said conical recess; yieldable means urging said ball normally into its closed position;:a separable male coupler member having a projecting tube with a frusto-conical outer periphery matching in shape said conical recess and adapted to fit snugly therein in ametal-to-rnetal contact, and having a connection leading to said syringe; and :a ball displacement member substantially thinner than the opening through said'tube and;projecting from the .end thereof, so asto unseat saidball when said coupler is inserted in said'conical recess.

l9.,A coupling unit for use in connection with .a dental syringe attachment or the like, and a water faucet including in combination: a valve assembly having one inlet and twooutlets, the inlet being-adapted to be secured to'saidfaucet, one outletleading'to said syringe and the other directly through, for use as a faucet, said valve assembly having'at one end an interior recess in connection with the syringe passage and -a conical recess leading in axially'from outside and intersectingv said interior recess;sa ball insaidinterior recess-adapted to close it off from saidconical recessyyieldable means urging said ball normally into its closed position; a separable male coupler member having a projecting tube with a frustoconical outer periphery matching in shape said conical recess and adapted to fit snugly therein in a metal-to-metal contact, and having a connection leading to said syringe; and a ball displacement member substantially thinner than the opening through said tube and projecting from the end thereof, so as to unseat said ball when said coupler is inserted in said conical recess.

20. A valve unit for use in connection with a dental syringe attachment or the like and a Water faucet including in combination: a hollow housing adapted to be secured to said faucet and having a vertical passage therethrough and a horizontal passage therethrough, both passages being open at both ends, said horizontal passage having a frusto-conical wall; a valve body having a frustoconical axial periphery adapted to fit rotatably in said horizontal passage and having an annular radial bearing face at said smaller diameter end, with a reduced-diameter axial stem extending out therebeyond, the other end being a substantially flat radial face, said body having a diametric passage therethrough adapted for alignment with said vertical passage for passage of water directly therethrough, when said body is in one rotational position, and a second passage leading from an opening through said periphery substantially midway between the diametric passage openings and leading out through said radial face; means to regulate the orifice of said second passage adjacent said radial face; an annular thrust hearing in contact with said annular hearing face and closing one end of said housing horizontal passage against leakage; handle means secured to said stem for rotating said valve body; a closure and coupling member engaging the opposite end of said housing horizontal passage against leaking, said closure member having an annular axial recess therein and a central axial recess, both leading from the inner side thereof, opposite said valve body and defining an annular wall therebetween, said closure mem-- her having a center coupling passage leading in axially from the outer side thereof and intersecting said central axial recess; spring means in said annular recess under compression between said valve body and. said closure member and adapted to urge said valve body against said thrust bearing; and valve means controlling the connection between said central recess and said coupling passage.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2961741 *May 9, 1956Nov 29, 1960American Steel FoundriesHydraulic descaler
US2992657 *Jun 2, 1958Jul 18, 1961Weddendorf Jr Albert HControl device for flowable materials
US3144867 *Aug 24, 1962Aug 18, 1964Trupp BernardDental prophylactic
US3593707 *Sep 25, 1968Jul 20, 1971Pifer George WilliamJet tooth brush
US3667683 *Feb 25, 1970Jun 6, 1972Hydro Mfg IncDiverter valve assembly
US3680791 *Mar 20, 1970Aug 1, 1972Morton Clive CAerator valve and dental cleanser appliance
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US4000742 *Oct 20, 1975Jan 4, 1977Digicomo Edward FWall mounted hygienic device
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US4894053 *Aug 26, 1988Jan 16, 1990Reddick David CDouche apparatus
US4942870 *Aug 29, 1988Jul 24, 1990George DamienDental hygiene device
US5293903 *Aug 27, 1992Mar 15, 1994G. A. Murdock, Inc.T-connector for use in plumbing
US6453489 *Apr 23, 2001Sep 24, 2002Terng Yaw LeeFaucet coupling device for coupling to various members
US8012111 *Dec 21, 2007Sep 6, 2011Carolyn Marlow ReamOral hygiene device
EP0935951A2 *Feb 15, 1999Aug 18, 1999Diego SodoWater-jet device particulary for interdental cleaning
WO2002094119A1 *May 16, 2002Nov 28, 2002Iniziativa Ct Sud S R LDental hygiene device
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/150, 239/579, 239/581.1, 137/597
International ClassificationA61H13/00, A61C17/00, A61C17/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61C17/0214, A61H13/005
European ClassificationA61C17/02F, A61H13/00B