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Publication numberUS2830585 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 15, 1958
Filing dateApr 21, 1955
Priority dateApr 21, 1955
Publication numberUS 2830585 A, US 2830585A, US-A-2830585, US2830585 A, US2830585A
InventorsEfram I Weiss
Original AssigneeEfram I Weiss
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ankle support
US 2830585 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 15, 1958 E. l. WEISS ANKLE SUFYPORT' Filed April 21, 1955 v INVENTOR EFRAM I. WEISS ATTORNEY United States Patent G ANKLE SUPPORT Efrain I. Weiss, New York, N. Y. Application April 21, 1955, Serial No. 502,951 8 Claims. (Cl. 128-466) The present invention relates to an ankle support generally, and more particularly to an ankle support for supporting and protecting the ankle and associated parts of the human foot in high-topped shoes used in sports, including skating, skiing, and the like.

Persons engaging in strenuous sports, including skating, skiing, mountain climbing, and the like, require eflicient and comfortable ankle support. In the past, higb-topped shoes used with such sports have been found to chafe and irritate the foot portions. Prior art methods of insuring a tight fit of the shoes have necessitated the use of ankle straps, and the like, which often aggravate the chafing and discomfort.

The present invention, accordingly, is directed to an improved ankle support for use in high-topped shoes which avoids irritation and chafing and yet provides adequate support by filling out the voids and hollows between the shoe and the foot around the ankle and heel portions.

Specifically, the ankle support of the present invention supports the wearers ankle by filling the vacant spaces between the shoe and the wearers foot adjacent the ankle on either side of the Achilles tendon, thus serving as a wedge to prevent slipping and up and down movement of the heel within the shoe.

The ankle support of the present invention is inexpensive of manufacture, durable and simple in construction. Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent.

The present invention generally comprises an ankle support comprising a body portion adapted to encircle the ankle at the ankle bone, the body including .a stirrup member to pass under the foot of the wearer, detachable fastening means for adjustably securing the front portions of the support to each other, the body portion being pro vided with a pair of pneumatic cushions adapted to rest against each ankle bone on either side of the Achilles tendon of the wearer.

The invention further comprises such a support where-. in the pneumatic cushions are connected by an inflatable connector adapted to extend around the Achilles tendon. The invention further comprises such a support wherein said pneumatic cushions are inflatable through a flexible tube and the inflating fluid is confined by means of a valve carried by said tube. The invention additionally comprises such an ankle support wherein the fastening means comprise eyes carried on the body portion and laces for lacing the ends of the body portion together at the wearers instep.

Referring to the drawings;

Fig. 1 is a view of the inside of the ankle support, shown removed from the wearers foot.

Fig. 2 is a view in elevation of the inside of the wearers foot showing the ankle support in position and the boot in dot-dash lines.

Fig. 3 is a view in elevation of the outside of the wearers foot showing the ankle support in position and the boot in dot-dash lines.

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Fig. 4 is a front top perspective view of the ankle support on the wearers foot.

The ankle support comprises a body portion 11 formed of rubber or flexible plastic material having a flexible stirrup member 12 adapted to pass under the wearers foot at the arch. A pair of pneumatic cushions or inflatable bladders 13 of impervious material are carried on said support 11 at positions such that they cover the ankle bones and extend rearwardly thereof on either side of the Achilles tendon 21. An inflatable connecting portion 14 connects the two cushions 13 and the cushions are inflatable through tube 15, preferably flexible, provided with a suitable valve 16. The ends of the body portion 11 are provided with detachable fastening means for adjustably securing them together at the instep of the wearers foot. Lacing eyes 17 and a lace 18 may be used as shown in the drawings or any equivalent fastening means such as straps, buckles, hooks and the like may be used. i

As shown in Fig. 1, the pneumatic cushions 13 and the connecting portion 14 are preferably formed integrally with the body portion 11, by providing a doubled piece of rubber or plastic material of the general shape shown and sealing the two portions together as at 20 to define the cushion members. Other types of construction may be employed, however, if desired, such as uniting the pneumatic cushions to the ankle-encircling body portion.

In use the ankle support with the cushions deflated is placed on the wearers foot to encircle the ankle with the flexible stirrup 12 extending under the arch. The end portions are then laced tightly at the instep and the hightopped boot or shoe placed on the foot. After the shoe is laced up comfortably, the pneumatic cushions are inflated through tube 15 by means of a suitable pump and the valve 16 is then closed to retain the air or other inflating fluid in the cushions. The cushions are preferably inflated to such a degree as spaces between the rear of the ankle and the shoe 19.

The cushions thus fill out the voids between the shoe and the rear of the ankle on either side of the Achilles tendon, providing comfortable support and protection for the ankle. The inflated cushions wedge between the shoe and the portions rearwardly of the ankle on either side of the Achilles tendon, thus preventing the wearers heel from sliding up and down within the shoe. The inflatable connecting portion 14 additionally fills the void between the shoe and the Achilles tendon, thus providing further support and preventing up and down motion of the heel within the shoe. At those positions where the wearers foot normally tightly contacts the shoe, such as the forward portions of the ankle bones, the cushions will not be inflated to any appreciable degree. Thus, the ankle support of the present invention gives support where it is needed on either side of the Achilles tendon and rearwardly of the ankle bone while not causing discomfort in those regions where the shoe is in firm contact with the wearers foot.

While the invention has been described in terms of certain embodiments, such description is to be interpreted in an illustrative rather than in a limiting sense. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that many modifications may be devised and it is intended to cover all such modifications as fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An ankle support and protector, comprising a body portion adapted to encircle the ankle at the ankle bone, said body including a stirrup member to pass under the foot of the wearer, detachable fastening means for adjustably securing the front portions ofthe support to each other, said body portion being provided with a pair of pneumatic cushions adapted to rest against and cover to completely fill the vacant each ankle bone, on either side of the Achil1es-tendon of the wearer.

2. The ankle support set forth in claim 1 wherein said detachable fastening means comprise lace means adapted to be fastened at the wearers instep.

3. The ankle support set forth in claim 1 including an inflation tube for inflating said cushions and a valve carried by said tube for retaining the inflating fluid in said cushions.

4. An ankle support and protector, comprising a body portion adapted to encircle the ankle at the ankle bone, said body including a stirrup member to pass under the foot of .the wearer, detachable fastening means for adjustably securing the front portions of the support to each other, said body portionbeing provided with a pair of interconnected pneumatic cushions adapted torest against and cover each anklebone, said pneumatic cushions being connected by an inflatable connector adapted to extend around the Achilles tendon of the wearer.

5. The ankle support-set forth in claim 4-wherein said detachable fastening means comprise lace means adapted to be fastened at the wearers instep.

6. The ankle support set forth in claim 4 including an inflation tube for inflating said cushions and a valve carried by .said tube for retaining the inflating fluid in said cushions.

7. An ankle support comprising a'fiexible band adapted to encircle the ankle of the wearers foot, said band having two terminal portions adapted to meet at the instep of the wearers foot, means for fastening said terminal portions together at the instep, a stirrup strap secured at each and adapted to be positioned under the arch of the wearers foot and a pair of pneumatic cushions carried by said band adapted to rest against and cover each ankle bone and extend rearwardly of each ankle bone on either side of the Achilles tendon of the wearers foot.

8. The ankle support set forth in claim 7 wherein said pair of pneumatic cushions are interconnected by an inflatable portion adapted to extend around the Achilles tendon of the Wearers foot.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,658,037 Bromley Feb. 7, 1928 2,638,690 Bullard May 19, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1658037 *Apr 7, 1926Feb 7, 1928Spalding & Bros AgAnkle supporter
US2638690 *May 29, 1950May 19, 1953Iii Edward P BullardArticle of footwear
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3237319 *Jun 22, 1964Mar 1, 1966Hanson Alden WadeSki boots having a thixotropic material encircling the ankle portion thereof
US3250251 *Mar 23, 1964May 10, 1966Clifford Geary William RichardLeg clamps for animals
US3268912 *Jan 6, 1964Aug 30, 1966Whelan Clifford HAnkle protector for bowler
US3343532 *Feb 2, 1965Sep 26, 1967Medico Ortopedica Dott OffOrthopaedic apparatus for immobilizing and stretching the cervical column
US3402411 *Jan 12, 1966Sep 24, 1968Hanson Alden WadeProcess for making boots, sports equipment and hats
US4280489 *Apr 21, 1980Jul 28, 1981Johnson Jr Glenn WAnkle brace
US4300759 *Mar 31, 1980Nov 17, 1981Amf IncorporatedInflatable aquatic exerciser
US4502470 *Sep 16, 1982Mar 5, 1985Kiser John LPhysiologic device and method of treating the leg extremities
US4575954 *Feb 16, 1984Mar 18, 1986Bye Michael EShoe construction with foot and ankle restraining means
US5000195 *Jun 21, 1988Mar 19, 1991Deroyal Industries, Inc.Ankle splint
US5155864 *Apr 23, 1991Oct 20, 1992Lisco, Inc.Inflatable bladders for game gloves
US5155865 *Jul 11, 1991Oct 20, 1992Lisco, Inc.Inflatable bladders for game gloves
US5155866 *Dec 5, 1991Oct 20, 1992Lisco, Inc.Inflatable game gloves
US5253435 *Aug 19, 1991Oct 19, 1993Nike, Inc.Pressure-adjustable shoe bladder assembly
US5257470 *Feb 19, 1991Nov 2, 1993Nike, Inc.Shoe bladder system
US5400529 *Jun 22, 1993Mar 28, 1995Oansh Designs, Ltd.Sports medicine shoe
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US5423088 *Oct 1, 1992Jun 13, 1995Lisco, Inc.Inflatable game gloves
US5430961 *Sep 27, 1991Jul 11, 1995Converse Inc.Reactive energy apparatus providing a custom fit and ankle support in a shoe upper
US5501659 *Apr 11, 1994Mar 26, 1996Smith & Nephew Donjoy, Inc.Ankle brace
US5509938 *Jan 4, 1994Apr 23, 1996Phillips; Van L.Prosthetic foot incorporating adjustable bladder
US5527269 *Dec 19, 1994Jun 18, 1996Medi Bayreuth Gmbh & Co.Ankle joint orthesis
US5645525 *Jul 21, 1995Jul 8, 1997Brown Medical IndustriesHeel stabilizing device and method for treating heel pain
US5765298 *Mar 12, 1993Jun 16, 1998Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with pressurized ankle collar
US6189172Jan 14, 2000Feb 20, 2001Dc Shoes, Inc.Removable liner and inflatable bladder for snowboard boots and method of manufacture
US6655050 *Mar 3, 2000Dec 2, 2003Joseph B. LoweSnowboard boot with inflatable bladders
US6766599Feb 20, 2001Jul 27, 2004Dc Shoes, Inc.Removable liner and inflatable bladder for snowboard boots and method of manufacture
US7010823Jul 26, 2004Mar 14, 2006Dc Shoes, Inc.Removable liner and inflatable bladder for snowboard boots and method of manufacture
US7373742 *Feb 25, 2005May 20, 2008Sport Maska Inc.Skate boot construction with 3-D heel pocket
US7681254 *Nov 11, 2003Mar 23, 2010X-Technology Swiss GmbhSock having Achilles tendon protection
DE2913606A1 *Apr 2, 1979Oct 18, 1979Johnson JunKnoechelgelenkstuetze bzw. -schiene
DE4011888A1 *Apr 12, 1990Oct 17, 1991Juergen StumpfVorrichtung zur verhinderung von aussenbaenderverletzungen
DE102009028471A1 *Aug 12, 2009Feb 17, 2011Svetlana KnezevicFootwear e.g. training shoe, for use during sports training i.e. athletic training, has fluid-tight chamber including leg opening through which chamber is filled with fluid, and extending in vertical direction through external ankle
WO1994016589A1 *Jan 27, 1994Aug 4, 1994Ronald S KrivoshaHeel stabilizing device and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/65, D24/192, 128/DIG.200, 36/7.10R, 2/22, 36/71
International ClassificationA61F5/01
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/20, A61F5/012
European ClassificationA61F5/01D2