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Publication numberUS2831620 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 22, 1958
Filing dateJul 19, 1954
Priority dateJul 19, 1954
Publication numberUS 2831620 A, US 2831620A, US-A-2831620, US2831620 A, US2831620A
InventorsSchlicksupp Theodore F
Original AssigneeSchlicksupp Theodore F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-sealing closure mechanism for liquids
US 2831620 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A ril 22, 1958 T. F. SCHLICKSUPP 2,831,620

SELF-SEALING CLOSURE MECHANISM FOR LIQUIDS Filed July 19, 1954 2 Sheets -Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

THEODORE F. SCHLICKSUPP HIS ATTORNEYS SELF-SEALING CLOSURE MECHANISM FOR LIQUIDS Theodore F. Schlirksupp, Long Island City, N. Y. Application July 19, 1954, Serial No. 444,115

4 Claims. (Cl. 222-517) This invention relates to devices for closing containers of various kinds from which liquids are to be dispensed, and, more particularly, it relates to a discharge mechanism which is self-sealing or self-closing so that the container can not be unintentionally left open after use.

The discharge mechanism of the invention is intended to be used in connection with containers for liquids, creams, toilet water, skin lotions, perfume, and the like, where conservation of the liquid is essential, and also with containers charged with a volatile propellant under suitable pressure.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a discharge mechanism which provides a tight closure so as to reduce evaporization to a minimum, and which at the same time can be easily manipulated to control the discharge of the contents of the container.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of this kind which can be readily applied to the bottle of toilet water, lotion, etc. in place on the cap or other closure with which the bottle is provided at the time of purchase.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device of this kind wherein the construction is sufficiently simple and economical to produce to enable it to be supplied with the container in place of the ordinary cap or other closure, or, if desired, built into the container as a permanent part thereof.

The construction of the improved discharge mechanism of the invention will be understood from a consideration of the accompanying drawings and the following detailed description of the several embodiments illustrated therein.

In these drawings:

Figs. 1 and 2 are views the device in closed and open positions, respectively;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing a very slightly changed form of the device in open position;

Figs. 4 and 5 are similar views of another modification, in closed and open positions, respectively;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken on line 66 of Fig. 4;

Figs. 7 and 8 are views similar to Figs. 1 and 2 showing a still further modification;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 10 is a sectional view taken on line 10-10 of Fig. 7.

Referring now to these drawings, the device comprises a generally cylindrical body member, or fixed part 44, a spout or nozzle member indicated generally by reference numeral 40, having at its outer or upper end a discharge aperture 4b, and an associated valve seat surrounding the inner periphery of this aperture, together with a central post 5b supporting at its outer end a valve member 6b, the end of the fixed post itself being rounded to constitute this valve member. At least the outer end portion 45 of nozzle member 40 is a substantially rigid cylindrical member, as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, although in Fig. 3

life ates Patent A O this rigid portion 45b is much longer and extends'approximately the entire length of the nozzle.

Such rigid nozzle portion 45 (Figs. 1 and 2) is connected with the body member 44 by means of a longitudinally extending bellows sections 41, having bellows-like formations therein with alternate inwardly and outwardly projecting folds 42. and 43. This bellows section renders the nozzle end portion 45 movable both longitudinally and laterally. The inner surface of such nozzle end portion is conical forming a cam surface 29c, and the bellows-like portion 41 of the nozzle being both flexible and resilient, tends to urge the end portion of the nozzle and the fixed post 5b in opposite directions so as to cause the valve 4b, 6b to be biased to closed position as shown in Fig. 1.

The bellows construction referred to renders the nozzle both axially and laterally displaceable, and inasmuch as it is made of resilient material the spout member is also resilient in both of these directions. The spout members shown in each of Figs. l-10 are made of any suitable flexible and resilient material, and advantageously are made of nylon plastic although they may also be made of other plastic, such as polyethylene or of thin resilient metal.

The body portion 44 of the device is formed by enlarging the lower portion of spout member 40, that is, these parts are integral with one another. This body portion is fittedclosely, with a force or push fit, onto the outer cylindrical surface of a collar member 46 by which the discharge mechanism may be removably connected to the neck 47 of the container by means of the screw threads shown, or otherwise.

The post member 5b is advantageously made integral with a base flange or base portion 48, formed integrally with the upper end of collar 46.

The flow of the material from the container to the discharge aperture 4b is upwardly through a set of four passageways 49 which extend through the base flange 48 adjacent the base of post 5b so that the material may flow upwardly in the annular space between this post and the nozzle member 40 as indicated by the arrows.

Referring to Fig. 2 which shows the device in open position, the opening action is obtained by pressing with the fingers on the side of the spout or nozzle member 40 in any direction. This opening movement causes the inner conical or cam surface 290 of the end portion of the nozzle to slide on the rounded outer end 6b of the post and open the discharge aperture 4b, inasmuch as cam surface 290 is in contact with the rounded outer end 6b of the post when the spout and post are in coaxial position, i. e. even when the post closes the discharge aperture 4b (Fig. 1). The resilient construction of the nozzle member 40 resulting from the cylindrical bellows formation permits not only the tilting of the nozzle, but also the necessary axially outward movement of the outer end portion 45. It will be understood that upon release of the pressure at the side of the nozzle it will automatically return to closed position by the natural resilient nature of the material of which the nozzle is made and the cam action of the coacting surfaces of 290 and 6b.

It will be understood that the annular space intermediate the post and spout member serves in the various forms of the discharge mechanism to permit the tilting movement required to open the nozzle mechanism, and in addition also to serve as the flow space for the material between the neck of the container and the discharge opening of the nozzle.

With certain exceptions, the construction shown in Fig. 3, is similar to that just described. Thus, the outer end of the post member 50 is formed with a conical valve portion 6c having a pointed tip and constructed to cooperate with a smaller discharge opening 4c. Also, the spout or nozzle member 40a is formed as a smooth cylinder without the cylindrical bellows-like formation of Figs. 1 and 2. Also, the interconnection of the base of the nozzle with the body portion 44a is by means of what may be described as a radial type of bellows, indicated generally by numeral 50.

Such a radial bellows construction includes a downwardly or inwardly projecting fold 51 from the lower end of the cylindrical spout member 40a and continuing into an upwardly extending cylindrical portion 52 which may be approximately one-quarter the height of the spout member. At the upper end of cylindrical portion 52 there is a second upwardly extending fold 53 which joins it with a downwardly flared conical skirt portion 54. This lower end of this skirt joins integrally with the body section 44a.

With the spout or nozzle member 40a and its integral parts molded for nylon, the two folds 51 and 53 will provide sufficient axial flexibility as well as lateral flexibility to permit the axial and lateral displacements of the upper end portion 44b which are required in shifting such upper end from the central or closed position to the open position as shown in Fig. 3.

In the modified form of the device shown in Figs. 4 and the construction of the spout or nozzle member 40a is identical with that just described including the construction of its lower end with the formation 50 which has been referred to as a radial form of bellows. The only difference between these two modifications is in the construction of the post and valve members.

Instead of a solid post, the form shown in Figs. 4- and 5 is provided with a hollow post 5d. This post has a cylindrical bore 55 extending from bottom to top within the upper end of which a plug type valve 6d slides. This valve is urged upwardly by means of a coil spring 56 which is seated at the bottom of bore 55 on a ledge surrounding a central opening 57. This opening is necessary for the admission of the contents of the container to the interior of bore 55, and in order to allow the material to flow past the plug valve 6d it is made of generally triangular shape in cross section, as shown in Fig. 6, with the apexes of the triangular formation rounded to fit the surface of bore 55, and with the flat sides spaced from the walls of the bore to form flow passages. Valve 6a and spring 56 are preferably of metal. The upper end of the valve member is a pointed cone so as to close a small aperture 40 the same as in the device of Fig. 3, although a larger discharge aperture, and a corresponding change in the valve form can be made, if desired.

The opening of this mechanism is by a tilting movement of the spout member 40a as in the other forms, but it is not necessary for the outer end 45 of the nozzle member to move axially inasmuch as the required relative motion is provided by the sliding valve member 6d.

Referring now to Figs. 7, 8 and 10, the discharge mechanism construction here shown is intended for use where some degree of pressure exists within the container upon which the mechanism is mounted. Such pressure might be due to the incorporation in the container of a volatile propellant for the purpose of discharging the contents in the form of a spray, foam, lather, etc.

In this form of the mechanism the post 5e carries at its upper end a small valve member 58 which is placed horizontally instead of vertically and cooperates with a. small lateral discharge aperture 59 provided in the side wall of the spout or nozzle member 40b adjacent the end thereof. The discharge is therefore lateral instead of axial.

The opening of the valve is caused by tilting the nozzle 40]) as in the other constructions, although it is necessary to place an indicator on the end of the nozzle to show in which, direction the nozzle should be tilted. The post Se is rigid and may be supported as described in connection with Figs. 1 and 2. As shown, it has a bore 59 extending from end to end for the flow of the container contents to the discharge aperture, although perforations may be made around the base of the post and the flow permitted through the space between the post and interior wall of the nozzle, as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, and also in the earlier figures.

The valve 58 is preferably provided with an integral supporting disc 60 and, to mount the valve, a cross bore 61 is provided at the top of post 5e slightly larger in diameter than the disc 69. This bore 61 is open at its left-hand end, but is not cut entirely through at the right end, leaving a thin vertical wall 62. The shank of the valve 58 is inserted through a small aperture made in this wall, and the valve is held in place by means of a coil spring 63. Spring 63 not only holds the valve in place, but projects from the left-hand open end of cross bore 61 and engages the interior wall of the nozzle or spout member 4%. This spring therefore tends to return the spout member to vertical position in axial alignment with the post 5e to close the valve after the nozzle member has been tilted to the right in open position, as shown in Fig. 8.

The extent of tilting movement required for the opening of the valve in this form of the invention, is small, and is provided for by the flexibility of a small radial flange portion 64 which is formed on the lower end of spout or nozzle member 40b and joins in the base of this nozzle to the body portion 44a.

It will be understood that changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of the parts of the closure mechanism of the invention, which changes are intended to be included as part of the invention if they are within the terms of the appended claims.

it will also be understood that the form of the invention shown in Figs. 7 and 8, instead of being removably attached to the container in the manner shown in the drawings, or otherwise, may be built into the container structure itself thereby eliminating the necessity for a screw thread or similar attachment, and it will be understood further that in the forms of construction which include a movable valve, namely, Figs. 4 and 5, the flow of the contents to the discharge aperture may be, at least in part, through hollow post 5d.

I claim:

1. A discharge mechanism for containers comprising a fixed part, a post member fixed at its inner end to said part and projecting outwardly therefrom, a valve member adjacent the outer end of said post, a spout member surrounding and in spaced relation to said post and forming an annular passage therewith, said spout member having a discharge aperture adjacent its outer end and a seat for said valve member associated with said aperture, said spout member being displaceable to a tilting position with respect to said post, said spout member having a flexible resilient bellows section intermediate its outer end and said fixed part urging the said post and spout memher in opposite axial directions and towards coaxial position with respect to said post to close the said discharge aperture, and an interior cam surface at the outer end of said spout member in engagement with said valve member when said post and spout members are in coaxial position so that when a lateral force is applied to tilt the spout member the interaction of said cam surface with said valve member causes a combined lateral and longitudinal movement of the outer end of said spout member thereby opening said discharge aperture.

2. A discharge mechanism as set forth in claim 1 wherein the outer end of the spout member has an interior conical surface forming a cam surface which is in operative engagement with the outer end of said post when the post and spout members are in coaxial position.

3. A discharge mechanism as claimed in claim 1 in which the spout member is of substantially rigid tubular form and the flexible resilient bellows section thereof is a radial formation connecting the inner end of said spout member and the fixed part and rendering the spout member flexible and resilient both laterally and longitudinally for coaction with the fixed post.

4. A discharge mechanism for containers comprising a fixed part, a post member fixed at its inner end to said part and projecting outwardly therefrom, a valve member adjacent the outer end of said post, a spout member surrounding said post and forming an annular passage therewith, said spout member having a discharge aperture adjacent its outer end and a seat for said valve member associated with said aperture, said spout member being displaceable to a tilting position with respect to said post, said spout member having an enlarged base portion joining it to said fixed part, the inner end of the spout member and said enlarged base portion being interconnected by a flexible resilient section urging said post and spout member in opposite axial directions and towards coaxial position with respect to said post to close the said discharge aperture, and an interior cam surface at the outer end of said spout member in engagement with said valve member when said post and spout members are in coaxial position so that when a lateral force is applied to tilt the spout member the interaction of said cam surface with said valve member causes a combined lateral and longitudinal movement of the outer end of said spout member thereby opening said discharge aperture.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,418,592 McGee June 6, 1922 1,958,434 Hartog May 15, 1934 2,107,106 Crook Feb. 1, 1938 2,223,854 Peaster Dec. 3, 1940 2,591,465 Popofi Apr. 1, 1952 2,614,732 Pararra Oct. 21, 1952 2,615,597 Tomasek et al. Oct. 28, 1952 2,641,376 Parziale et a1. June 9, 1953 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No 2,831,620 Theodore F. Schlicksupp. April 22, 1958 It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1, line 34, for "on the" read of the column 3, line 19, for "for nylon read from Nylon Signed and sealed this 27th day of May 1958.,

(SEAL) Attest:

KARL AXL INE I ROBERT c. WATSON Attestlng Officer Comnissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
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US1418592 *Jun 3, 1920Jun 6, 1922 Necticut
US1958434 *Feb 6, 1933May 15, 1934American Tube And Cap CorpClosure for containers
US2107106 *Apr 30, 1937Feb 1, 1938James M CrookClosure for containers of liquid or semiliquid substances
US2223854 *May 11, 1939Dec 3, 1940Peaster Milton EAntileak nozzle
US2591465 *Sep 14, 1949Apr 1, 1952Vladimir PopoffDispensing cap having cam actuated closure
US2614732 *Jun 23, 1948Oct 21, 1952Pararra Lefer IncMoistureproof salt shaker
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2974835 *Feb 12, 1959Mar 14, 1961Herbrick Milton BSelf-sealing receptacle closure
US3128016 *Feb 16, 1961Apr 7, 1964Ferri Jr Gustave LContainer with dispensing spout
US3191622 *May 2, 1963Jun 29, 1965Sunbeam CorpDispensing valve
US3193154 *Mar 30, 1962Jul 6, 1965Frank T JohmannClosure means
US3221952 *Nov 27, 1963Dec 7, 1965Halkey Roberts CorpDispensing container closure
US3273757 *Oct 30, 1964Sep 20, 1966Moen Lenard EFluid dispenser with support therefor
US3285477 *Apr 1, 1965Nov 15, 1966Gen Foods CorpLiquid metering dispenser
US3506165 *Mar 27, 1968Apr 14, 1970Beard Walter CValve mechanism
US3637118 *Feb 9, 1970Jan 25, 1972Destefano AlfredSelf-closing liquid dispenser
US4389004 *Jul 17, 1981Jun 21, 1983Bon Luigi DelSelf-closing tilting valve
US4541550 *May 20, 1983Sep 17, 1985Luigi Del BonSelf-closing tilting valve
US4707279 *Nov 19, 1986Nov 17, 1987Walls Gary CSelf-seating valve with compressive release
US5265777 *May 18, 1992Nov 30, 1993Primary Delivery Systems, Inc.Push-push tilting dispensing cap system
US9060654 *Aug 15, 2011Jun 23, 2015Gojo Industries, Inc.Dispenser with multi-directional pushbar
US20070116509 *Jan 9, 2006May 24, 2007Robert LinCollapsible squeeze tube
US20130043284 *Feb 21, 2013Jackson W. WegelinDispenser with multi-directional pushbar
DE1222397B *Jun 9, 1961Aug 4, 1966Helmut Bross Dipl IngBehaelterverschluss mit streckbarem Entnahmerohr
DE1775974B1 *Apr 5, 1968Apr 19, 1973Walter C Beard IncKippventil zur Abgabe eines in einem Behaelter unter Druck stehenden fliessfaehigen Materials
DE19638602A1 *Sep 20, 1996May 15, 1997Fritz MeckenstockDischarge valve for hand-operated pump
EP0045384A1 *Jul 8, 1981Feb 10, 1982Bon Luigi DelSelf-closing tilting valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/517, 401/262, 251/342, 222/529, 401/264
International ClassificationB65D47/04, B65D47/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/2081, B65D47/20
European ClassificationB65D47/20, B65D47/20E4B