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Publication numberUS2832745 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1958
Filing dateAug 31, 1956
Priority dateAug 31, 1956
Publication numberUS 2832745 A, US 2832745A, US-A-2832745, US2832745 A, US2832745A
InventorsHechenbleikner Ingenuin
Original AssigneeShea Chemical Corp, Columbia
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aqueous flameproofing compositions and cellulosic materials treated therewith
US 2832745 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent AQUEOUS FLAMEPROOFING COMPOSITIONS AND CELLULOSIC MATERIALS TREATED THEREWITH Ingenuin Hechenbleikner, Adams, Mass., assignor to Shea Chemical Corporation, Jelfersonville, Ind., and Columbia, Tenu., a corporation of Maryland No Drawing. Application August 31, 1956 Serial No. 607,300

9 Claims. (Cl. 26.0-29.4)

The present invention relates to the novel flame-proofing compositions, flammable materials treated therewith and methods of treating such flammable materials to render them flameproof.

agent. However, the use of this compound leaves the fabric with relatively poor tear and tensile strength. The combination of THPC with the bromoform adduct previously referred to has the disadvantage of the relatively high cost due to the use of the THPC, the objectionable odor liberated by THPC and the relatively low phosphorus content in the THPC.

It is an object of the present invention to form an improved flameproofing composition.

An additional object is to flameproof cellulosic materials in a manner to impart increased permanence to laundering.

A further object is to devise a more economic cellulosic fabric flameproofing composition.

Yet another object is to eliminate the tendering of cellulosic fabrics imparted by the application diethylphosphoramidate (diethyl amido phosphate) and a polymethylol compound thereto.

Still further objects and the entire scope of applicability of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description given hereinafter; it should be understood, however, that the detailed description and specific examples, while indicating preferred embodiments of the invention, are given by way of illustration only, since various changes and modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from this detailed description.

It has now been found that these objects can be attained by the use of a composition comprising (1) a compound having the formula 0 RiOIlI OR: or Rr0-NHI NH: NH: where R and R are alkyl or haloalkyL the sum of the carbon atoms in R and R being less than 8, (2) the adduct of a compound having the formula CX YZ, where X is chlorine or bromine, and Y and Z are hydrogen, chlorine or bromine with either a polymerizable neutral unsaturated alcohol ester of phosphoric acid or of an alkene phosphonic acid and (3) a polymethylol amide, azine or azole.

The preferred combination is the use of (l) diethyl phosphoramidate phosphoramidate 2,832,745 Patented Apr. 29, 1958 (2) the 1 to 1 mol ratio bromoform adduct of triallyl phosphate and (3) trimethylolmelamine. It is surprising that the present composition can be successfully applied to cellulosic materials as the combination of diethyl and trimethylolmelamine alone causes severe tendering of cellulosic fabrics, imparting a stiff board-like quality to the fabric. The novel compositions of the present invention, however, have improved flexibility and superior flameproofing qualities.

The flameproofing compositions of. this invention are preferably applied as aqueous dispersions. Preferably the objects to be flameproofed are cellulosic in nature, e. g., cotton textiles, regenerated cellulose fabrics, acetate rayon.

As examples of suitable amidophosphates having less than eight carbon atoms, there can be used diethyl amido phosphate, dipropyl amido phosphate, ethyl propyl amido phosphate, amyl diamido phosphate, di-2-chloroethylamido phosphate, di-2-bromoethylamido phosphate, diisopropyl amido phosphate, ethyl diamido phosphate, propyl diamido phosphate, 2-chloroethyl amido phosphate, etc. These compounds can be prepared in the manner set forth in Kosolapoff, Organophosphorus Compounds (1950), Reaction Method II, pages 279281, and the articles cited therein. The preferred amidophosphate or phosphonate is diethyl amido phosphate.

As the adduct of the compound having the formula CX YZ with the phosphate ester, there can be employed any of the adducts set forth in Frick et al. Patent 2,686,769, e. g., the adducts of CBr CB1' C1, CBr Cl CBIC13, CBI'3H, CB1'2H2, C014, or CClzHz neutral unsaturated alcohol esters of phosphoric acid such as trialkenyl phosphates, e. g., triallyl phosphate, trimethyllyl phosphate, triethallyl phosphate, diallyl phosphate, methyl divinyl phosphate, methallyl phosphate, etc. In place of the phosphates in forming the adducts with the CX YZ compounds, there can be used polymerizable neutral unsaturated alcohol esters of alkene phosphonic acids, e. g., diallyl propene-2-phosphonate, dimethallyl propene-Z-phosphonate, diethallyl propene-2- phosphonate, allyl methallyl propene-Z-phosphonate, etc. These phosphonates can be prepared in the manner set forth in Kosolapoff reaction method IA, pages 121-123 and the references cited therein. The preferred adduct is the 1 to 1 mol ratio adduct of bromoform with triallyl phosphate.

As the polymethylol amide, azine or azole, there can be used the formaldehyde reaction products with amides such as urea, thiourea, guanidine, dicyandiami'de, substituted ureas, e. g., methyl urea, ethylene diurea, decamethylene diurea, methylene diurea, oxamide, acetamide, malonie acid amide, phthalamide, 'succinic acid amide, biuret, sulfamide, toluene sulfonamide. There also can be used any of the amides or substituted ureas disclosed in DAlelio, United States Patent No. 2,320,816. Likewise, there can be used the reaction products of formaldehyde with aminotriazines such as melamine, ammeline, formoguanamine, acetoguanamine, ammelide, benzoguanamine, sym-triphenyl melamine, sym-triethyl melamine, 2-chloro-4,6-diaminotriazine, diaminotriazin'e, melam, melon, melem, as well as any of the aldehyde reactable aminotriazines disclosed in DAlelio, United States Patent No. 2,368,451 and Widmer et al., United States Patent No. 2,197,357. Likewise, there can be used diazines, e. g., 2,4-diamino-1,3-diazine, azoles, e. g.,

carbamyl .guanazole, guanazole, diamino pyrrole, etc.

amine, hexamethylol melamine, etc. Generally the amount of formaldehyde need not be more than suflicient to react with all the hydrogen atoms attached to the nitro mine is preferably applied to .a polymer, e; g. the

the bromoforrn adduct and the by the cloth is preferably in the range of about 1-1.5

gen atoms. The preferred compound for reaction with formaldehyde is melamine. uct is trimethylol melamine.

The mixture of the diethyl amido phosphate, bromoform adduct of triallyl phosphate and trimethylol melathe textile material in the form of an aqueous solution or dispersion. The bromoform-triallyl phosphate adduct is preferably employed as The preferred reaction prod- Frick Patent 2,686,769.

Preferably about 30-50% of the phosphorus deposited upon the cloth, e. g., cotton, should be contributed by total phosphorus pick-up of the total Weight of the cloth. The diethyl phosphoramidate (diethyl amidoph'osphate) is utilized in an amount of from 1 to 1.5 mols, e. g., 1.25 mols per mol of trimethylol melamine. The bromororm-triallyl phosphate (1 to 1 mol ratio) is preferably used in an amount of "0.25 to 0.5 mol per mol of trimethylol melamine.

It is believed that the trirnethylol melamine and diethyl amidophosphate form a thermosetting resin within the textile fiber. The bromoforrn-triallyl phosphate adduct modifies this composition to give increased flexibility and further gives some additional flame-proofing. The reaction of the amidophosphate with the trimethylol melamine and cellulose is believed to proceed as follows:

i NHCHzOH The methylol groups are then free to form ethers with cellulose and internal ethers with themselves. Both of the following types of reactions are believed to occur,

all percentages and parts are by weight.

Example 1 Cotton cloth was dipped in a solution prepared in the following manner:

1 part of diethyl phosphoramidate and 1 part of trimethylol melamine were dissolved in water. To the above solution there was added an equal weight of an emulsion made by mixing 252 parts of triallyl phosphate, 163 parts of bromoforrn, 12.5 parts of potassium persulfate, 85 parts of polyvinyl alcohol (medium viscosity), 22.5 parts of sodium bicarbonate and 850 parts of water. mechanically stirring the mixture until completely emulsified and then Warming the mixture at 85-90 C. for 2.5 hours with continuous stirring. (It should be noted that any of the emulsifying agents and catalysts described in Frick Patent 2,686,769 can be used in place of the polyvinyl alcohol and potassium persulfate of this example.)

The pH of the resulting mixture containing the diethyl polymer described in Example I of 'fiameproofed by phosphoramidate, trimethylolmelamine and polymerized bromoform-triallyl phosphate adduct was adjusted to 5-6 with phosphoric acid.

After the cotton cloth was dipped in the above mixture, the cloth was squeezed through a roll, cured for 3 minutes at 160 C. and dried at C. The dry pick-up of the cloth was about 25%.

In other examples carried out as this one, the dry pickup of the cotton cloth generally ranged from 20-30%.

In place of phosphoric acid, there can be employed any conventional acidic curing agent for melamine formaldehyde resins, such as those shown in the Widmer patent for example. The curing can be carried out by using temperatures below C. for longer than 3 minutes if desired.

The treated cotton cloth of Example I was fiameproof even after 20 launderings.

Example II Example I was repeated, replacing the cotton cloth with a regenerated cellulose (viscose) fabric. The fabric was also fiameproof even after 20 launderings.

I claim:

1. A flameproofing composition comprising a mixture of (a) a compound selected from the group consisting of u RiOiI ORn and RrO?-NH2 NH: NH:

where R and R are selected from the group consisting of alkyl monochloro alkyl and monobromo alkyl groups, the sum of the carbon atoms in R and R being less than 8, (b) the adduct of a compound having the formula CX YZ where X is a member of the group consisting of chlorine and bromine and Y and Z are selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, chlorine and bromine, with a compound from the group consisting of polymerizable, neutral, ethylenically unsaturated acyclic alcohol esters of phosphoric acid and polymerizable, neutral, ethylenically unsaturated acyclic alcohol esters of an alkene phosphonic acid and (c) a member of the group consisting of polymethylol amides, polymethylol azines and polymethylol azoles dispersed in water, compound (a) being used in amount of 1 to 1.5 mols per mol of compound (c) and adduct (b) being used in an amount of 0.25 to 0.5 mol of compound (c).

2. A normally inflammable material that has been impregnating the same with the compo sition of claim 1.

3. A composition according to claim 1 wherein the polymethylolamide is a polymethylol urea.

4. A composition according to claim 1 wherein the polymethylolamide is a polymethylol melamine.

5. A flameproofing composition comprising a mixture of 1 to 1.5 mols diethyl phosphoramidate, 0.25 to 0.5 mol of the adduct of bromoformwith triallyl phosphate and t 1 mol of a polymethylolmelamine dispersed in water.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,574,516 Walter et al Nov. 13, .1951 2,582,961 'Burnell ct a1. Jan. 22, 1952 2,686,769 Frick et a] Aug. 17, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2574516 *Nov 26, 1948Nov 13, 1951Glenn L Martin CoUnsaturated aliphatic phosphonamides
US2582961 *Sep 17, 1949Jan 22, 1952American Cyanamid CoTreatment of flammable materials to impart flame resistance thereto, compositions therefor, and products thereof
US2686769 *Oct 14, 1952Aug 17, 1954Us AgricultureFlameproofing aqueous suspensions of halomethylated phosphates
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3038924 *Feb 16, 1959Jun 12, 1962Philips CorpBis(dimethylamido)pentachlorophenylphosphate and the thiolophenyl phosphate derivative thereof
US3068060 *Aug 3, 1959Dec 11, 1962Rohm & HaasTreatment of cellulose textiles with phosphoramides
US3087955 *Feb 8, 1960Apr 30, 1963Dow Chemical CoO-haloalkyl o-alkyl phosphoramidothioates
US3157568 *Mar 12, 1962Nov 17, 1964Philips CorpBis(dimethylamido)pentachlorophenyl fungicidal compositions
US3240729 *Nov 30, 1962Mar 15, 1966David EastwoodPolyurethanes from phosphoramidates
US3527564 *Apr 15, 1968Sep 8, 1970Stevens & Co Inc J PProcess for carbonizing fibrous materials
US3676389 *Jun 12, 1970Jul 11, 1972Polaris Chem CorpFlame proofing compositions
US4026808 *Jul 1, 1974May 31, 1977Hooker Chemicals & Plastics CorporationTetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride and a phosphonium containing n-hydroxymethyl amide
US4370442 *Dec 5, 1980Jan 25, 1983Pearson Glenn AFire retardant compositions
US7727915Jan 18, 2007Jun 1, 2010Buckeye Technologies Inc.Tacky allergen trap and filter medium, and method for containing allergens
US7837009Sep 29, 2006Nov 23, 2010Buckeye Technologies Inc.Nonwoven material for acoustic insulation, and process for manufacture
US7878301Jul 2, 2007Feb 1, 2011Buckeye Technologies Inc.Fire retardant nonwoven material and process for manufacture
US7918313Mar 31, 2006Apr 5, 2011Buckeye Technologies Inc.Nonwoven material for acoustic insulation, and process for manufacture
US8388807Feb 8, 2011Mar 5, 2013International Paper CompanyPartially fire resistant insulation material comprising unrefined virgin pulp fibers and wood ash fire retardant component
US8663427Apr 7, 2011Mar 4, 2014International Paper CompanyAddition of endothermic fire retardants to provide near neutral pH pulp fiber webs
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EP2481744A1Feb 1, 2011Aug 1, 2012EMPA Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und ForschungsanstaltAromatic bis-phosphoramidate additives as flame retardants for polymers
WO2012018746A1Aug 2, 2011Feb 9, 2012International Paper CompanyAddition of endothermic fire retardants to provide near neutral ph pulp fiber webs
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Classifications
U.S. Classification524/34, 442/142, 524/136, 428/921, 524/41, 524/36, 558/199
International ClassificationD06M13/292, D06M15/433, D06M13/288
Cooperative ClassificationD06M13/292, D06M13/288, Y10S428/921, D06M15/433
European ClassificationD06M13/288, D06M13/292, D06M15/433