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Publication numberUS2834343 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1958
Filing dateMar 30, 1955
Priority dateMar 30, 1955
Publication numberUS 2834343 A, US 2834343A, US-A-2834343, US2834343 A, US2834343A
InventorsKeckler John W, Wilkening Walter O
Original AssigneeAro Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination mask and suit regulators
US 2834343 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 13, 1958 J. w. KECKLER ET AL ,8

COMBINATION MASK AND sur: REGULATORS Filed March 30, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 fizz/$250219 (fa/222 Z ffeekiez" y 13, 1953 J. w. KECKLER ET AL 2,834,343

COMBINATION MASK AND SUIT REGULATORS Filed March 50, 1955 5 SheetsSheet 2 &

y 1958 J. w. KECKLER ET AL 2,834,343

COMBINATION MASK AND surr' REGULATORS Filed March 30, 1955 S-Sheecs-Sheet 5 y 3 1958 J. w. KECKLER ETAL 2,834,343

COMBINATION MASK AND sun REGULATORS, Filed March so, 1955 Q 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 A5 65 fzzz/nz ozzf a; (70.522 Z4 Zfzeider May 13, 1958 J. w. KECKLER ETAL 2,834,343

COMBINATION MASK AND SUIT REGULATORS Filed March 50, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 United States Patet COMBINATION MASK AND SUIT REGULATORS John W. Keckler and Walter 0. Wilkening, Bryan, Ohio,

assignors to The Aro Corporation, Bryan, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application March 30, 1955, Serial No. 498,025

12 Claims. (Cl. 128-142) Our present invention relates to combination mask and suit regulators for aviators to automatically pressurize, at unlimited altitudes, the suits and breathing masks they wear for protection when flying at high altitudes.

One object of our invention is to provide mask and suit regulators of comparatively simple, durable, and inexpensive construction which may be attached to, or may be built into, a diluter demand oxygen regulator so as to utilize certain pressures already present therein for pressurizing the suit and for providing pressure breathing for the mask section of the oxygen regulator.

Another object is to provide an automatic suit regulator that normally opens the suit to atmosphere at a suit exhaust valve thereof, but at a predetermined altitude closes it to atmosphere, thus providing a ready pressure in the suit, with further increases in altitude resulting in opening a suit valve to supply fluid under pressure such as oxygen from the first stage of the oxygen regulator to the suit for pressurizing it, thus providing a physiologically required pressure on the aviators body.

Still another object is to provide the suit regulator in the form of a regulator that is responsive to the pressure in the suit as well as to altitude for proportioning the pressure in the suit in relation to altitude, thus keeping the required pressure substantially at the same absolute value at any altitude.

A further object is to provide a mask regulator having an automatic pressure breather demand valve for pressurizing the demand diaphragm of the oxygen regulator in response to increases in altitude, thereby providing oxygen under pressure at higher altitudes as required by the aviator to permit respiratory functions to continue at normal.

Still a further object is to provide the mask regulator responsive to altitude and utlizing pressure from the suit regulator as motive power to open a pressure breather demand valve of the mask regulator that pressurizes the demand diaphragm of the oxygen regulator.

An additional object is to provide the mask regulator with a pair of diaphragms, the space on one side of one of them being responsive to the suit pressure and the space between them being vented to atmosphere so that altitude variances will not change the effect of the pressure from the suit regulator on the valve of the mask regulator which thereby pressurizes the demand diaphragm in proportion to altitude.

Another additional object is to relate the diameters of the two diaphragms so that a pressure that is normally too high from the suit regulator to actuate the mask regulator valve can still be utilized by being modified by the effective areas of the two diaphragms.

With these and other objects in view our invention consists of the construction, arrangement and combina tion of the various parts of'our mask and suit regulator, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully setforth, pointed out in our claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein:

2,834,343 Patented May13, 1958 Fig. l is a front elevation of our combination mask and suit regulator.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof, showing the oxygen regulator in side elevation back of the panel.

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2 showing in elevation, an assembly of oxygen regulator, suit regulator and mask regulator, the demand diaphragm being removed.

Fig. 4 is a similar vertical sectional view on the line 44 of Fig. 2, showing the first stage diaphragm removed, some portions being broken away and others shown in section to illustrate details of construction.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view on the line 5-45 of Fig. 3

Fig. 6 is an enlarged vertical sectional view on the line 6-6 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged vertical sectional view on the line 77 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view on the line 8-8 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged vertical sectional view on the line 99 of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 10 is a diagrammatic view showing all elements of the oxygen, mask, and suit regulators in their operating relation to each other.

Referring first to Fig. 10, our combination mask and suit regulators are shown diagrammatically in connection with a diluter demand regulator. All three regulators are assemblies of manual and automatic valves, together with associated parts. First the valves will be referred to generally at 20, 3t), 40, 130, then the associated parts as shown in Fig. 10 will be referred to, and finally details of construction as shown in Figs. 1 to 9 will be described.

The diluter demand regulator has a body 13 in which are a plurality of chambers designated A, B, C, D, E, F, and G. The chambers A and B are separated by a partition 12. Our combination mask and suit regulators have a pair of chambers A, J, H and K. The valves of the diluter demand regulator are as follows: an oxygen supply valve 29, a pressure reducing valve 30, a demand valve 40, a Venturi valve 50, a diluter altitude valve 60, a diluter check valve 70, a diluter control valve 8t), and two relief valves 90 and 100. The valves of our combination mask and suit regulators are as follows: a suit valve 110, a suit exhaust valve 120, and a pressure breather demand valve 130.

The valve is manually opened or closed, depending upon whether oxygen is to be introduced to the chamber A or not, as desired by the user. The pressure reducer valve is automatically operated under the control of a diaphragm 31, subject on its exterior surface to atmospheric pressure, and on its interior surface to the pressure in the chamber A. The valve 30 regulates the flow of oxygen from the valve 20 into the chamber A to about p. s. i. This is usually termed the first stage pressure.

One wall of the chamber B is defined by a demand diaphragm 31. Outside of this diaphragm 41 is a seal diaphragm 42, sealing the space between the two diap-hragms 41 and 42 from atmosphere in a chamber 46 except for a port 47 to atmosphere. The port 47 is in a cover plate 53 for the diaphragms 41 and 42. A demand lever 44 is adapted to open the demand valve when the pressure in the chamber B decreases in response to inhalations by the aviator in a mask outlet 5i thereby depressing the diaphragms 4i and 42. The outlet 51 is usually connected by a flexible hose 51a to the face mask or helmet used in conjunction with the oxygen regulator and labeled Mask in Fig. 10. A port connects the mask outlet 51 and its chamber..D with the chamber B.

Interposed between the chambers C and D is the Venturi valve 50, normally seated on a Venturi valve seat 53, and provided with a small opening 52.

The chamber E is vented to atmosphere at ports 61 and the chamber G is connected by a port 81 to the exterior of a Venturi sleeve or mixing tube 58. The diluter altitude valve 60 is carried by an aneroid 62, and is adapted to approach and seat on a valve seat 63, as altitude increases. The diluter check valve 70 is normally closed by a light spring 71, and is seated on the opposite end of the seat 63.

The diluter control valve 80 may be manually seated and unseated relative to a seat 32 by a control handle 83.

The relief valve 90 is interposed between chambers A and B, while the relief valve 100 has its discharge open to atmosphere and is connected by a port 101 to the chamber B.

Our suit regulator SR has a chamber A communicating with the chamber A of the diluter demand regulator by a port 111. The suit valve 110 when open permits flow of oxygen under pressure from the chamber A into the chamber H of the suit regulator and from thence through the suit outlet 121 to the suit of the aviator for pressurizing it. The suit valve 110 is adapted to be controlled by an aneroid 112, subject to atmosphere through a port 123. Normally the aneroid 112 does not pressurize the suit, but an adjusting stern 125 thereof remains spaced from an exhaust valve seat 122 supported by a diaphragm 113 which is responsive on its right hand side to atmosphere through a port 123, and on its left hand side to the pressure in the chamber H. A spring 114 is normally under no tension against the outer side of the diaphragm 113, but tension can be applied and increased under the control of the operator by means of a control handle 115, as will hereinafter appear.

Upon increasing altitude the aneroid 112 will expand and finally engage the stern 125 with the exhaust valve seat 122 to move it against the suit exhaust valve 120, after which further movement effects opening of the suit valve 110 through a connecting stern 126.

The mask regulator MR has a chamber H connected.

One side of the chamber H is defined by a diaphragm 131. In the mask regulator there is a second chamber J, one side of which is defined by a diaphragm 133 of somewhat larger effective area than the diaphragm 131. The chamber I is connected by a port 136 to the space between the diaphragms 41 and 42. Suit pressure in the chamber H actuates the mask regulator MR.

A third chamber K in the mask regulator MR between the diaphragms 131 and 133 is open to atmosphere at a port 137. A. spring 134 contacts the diaphragm 133 and the load may be adjusted by an adjusting screw 138. A thrust pin 139 is adapted to transmit motion of the diaphragm 133 to the pressure breather demand valve 130.

Referring to Fig. 6, details of the valve 20 are shown. The oxygen inlet is shown at 21. A valve plug 22 may be seated on a seat 20a formed by the valve body 20 through the action of a stem extension 25 on a stem 24 of the valve plug 22. The stem 24 is sealed relative to the body 20 by a bellows 24a. The'stem extension 25 is threaded as illustrated so as to either seat the valve plug 22 or permit it to be unseated by the incoming oxygen, depending on the position of a control handle 26 connected to the stem extension 25. This handle is shown in Figs. 1 and 2, and may be moved either to the off or on positions shown on a panel 27.

An oxygen pressure gauge 17 on the panel 27 communicates by means of a connecting tube 18 with the outlet side of the oxygen supply valve 20 to at all times indicate whether the valve is on or ofi, and when on to indicate the pressure of the oxygen in 4. the supply tank. In the housing with the oxygen pressure gauge 17 is a second pressure gauge 79 connected by a capillary tube 102 with the chamber B to indicate the pressure in terms of altitude.

A passageway 28 leads from the outlet side of the valve plug 22 to a valve seat 32 (see Figs. 4 and 6). The pressure reducing valve 30 is shown in Fig. 4, as a plug which is operatively connected by a pin 33 to a lever 34 pivoted at 35. The lever 34 in turn is operatively connected by a link 36 and pivot pin 36a to a bell crank 37, pivoted at 37a. A link 38 connects the bell crank to diaphragm plates 39 and 39a of the diaphragm 31. The diaphragm is covered by a cover plate 29, open to atmosphere at ports 19.

The valve 30 is normally seated by a spring 16, the tension of which may be adjusted by means of an adjusting screw 15 bearing against a spring thrust disc 59. The spring seats against a fiange 14 of a stem 113 (see Fig. 9). The screw 15 is threaded in a boss 75 of the housing 13 and sealed in by a cover plate 76.

The parts above referred to as shown in Fig. 4 are in the chamber A, and are normally covered by the first stage diaphragm 31, which in this figure has been removed. In Fig. 10 the parts 33, 34, and 36 are shown diagrammatically as a single element.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 6, the demand lever 44 is illustrated as pivoted at 49 and loosely connected by a U-shaped clip 68 to a diaphragm engaging plate 66 that engages against the demand diaphragm 41. The lever carries a set screw 67 engaging the right hand end of a stem 64 in Fig. 6, the left hand end of which engages the valve disc 40 normally held seated by a spring 65 in a sleeve 69. Upon reduction of pressure in the chamber B diaphragm 41 is drawn inwardly (toward the left) to open the demand valve 40 against the action of the spring 65 in proportion to the demand. In Fig. 3 the demand diaphragm 41 is removed to show details behind it.

Referring to Fig. 6 the Venturi valve 50 is shown as an injector nozzle. It is normally retained seated on a seat 53 by a spring 54. The chamber C communicates with the interior of the injector nozzle 50 and the chamber G with the interior of the Venturi sleeve 58 which sleeve serves as a guide for the valve and injector nozzle 50 and as a seat for the spring 54.

Referring to Fig. 9, a boss 55 extends downwardly from the regulator body 13 and the aneroid 62 of the diluter altitude valve 60 is contained therein. A cover plate 56 is provided for the boss 55 and carries a perforated plate 61 for communicating the aneroid to atmosphere. An adjusting screw 57 is carried by the cover 56 for adjusting the position of the aneroid so that it can close the valve 60 against the seat 63 at a desired altitude. The boss 55 provides the chamber E, illustrated diagrammatically in Fig. 10.

Further refering to Fig. 9, the diluter check valve 70 (a disc) is seated by the spring 71 on the top of the valve seat 63, and the upper end of the spring is seated in a spring seat 72. The seat 72 is carried by an adjusting screw 74 and the parts just referred to are enclosed in a perforated cage 73, outside of which is the chamber F.

Referring to Figs. 1, 2, and 9, the diluter control valve is normally seated by a spring 87 on a seat shoulder 82 formed in the partition 12. A stem 77 extends upwardly from the valve 80 after passing through the chamber G, and a second stem 84 is adapted to engage its upper end, a spring 78 being interposed between the two to force the second stem upwardly. The control handle 83 is mounted on a rock shaft 85 having an eccentric cam 86 adapted to engage the upper end of the stem 84 and depress it and the stem 77 in one position of the handle. The position just referred to is the closed position shown in Figs. 9 and 10 and is the Oxygen position. Normally, the valve '80 is open and the lever 85 .is at the position indicated Normal as shown in Fig. 1, at which time air can enter through 61 and 70 to dilute the oxygen flowing into the chamber G.

The relief valve 90 as shown inFig. 7 is mounted in the partition 12, a boss 91 being provided therefor, and a spring 92 being provided to normally retain the valve seated. An adjusting plug93 is threaded in the boss 91 for adjusting the setting of the relief valve which usually .is in the neighborhood of 40 p..s. i. to relieve excess pressure from the chamber A tothe chamber B in case of leakage of the pressure reducing valve 30. Thus the oxygen is not wasted but can be used from the chamber B, unless .it is more than needed, in which case it is relieved to atmosphere at the relief valve 100.

.Detailsof the relief valve 100 are shown in Fig. 8. It consists of a fitting 94 screwed into the port 101 that communicates with the chamber B, a seat plate 95 and a housing 96, all three being bolted together as shown. A spring 97 normally seats the valve 100 and the'seating pressure can be adjusted by an adjusting screw 98. The housing 96 is vented to atmosphere at 99. The maximum pressurein the chamber B is about 3 p. s. i., :and the relief valve 100 is set to relieve pressure at about 3.3 p. s. i.

Describing now our combined mask and suit regulators, as applied to the diluter demand oxygen regulator thus far described, we will first describe the suit regulator, which is essentially the unit indicated by the bracket SR in Fig. 10, and extending to the right hand Wall of the regulator housing 13 having the port 111 therein. For constructional details reference is made to Figs. 3, 4, and S, and particularly Fig. 5. In these figures also the suit regulator is referred to generally by the reference character SR.

The suit regulator SR is contained in a housing 116, Fig. having a base plate 117 and a cover plate 118. The base plate in turn is secured to and suitably gasketed relative to the .regulator housing 13. The aneroid 112 is contained in the housing 116, which is open to atmosphere at 123 (see Figs. 4and The connection between the handle 115 in Fig. 10 and the spring 114 is shown in Figs. 3, 4, and '5, as comprising a slide pin 119, a sheet metal bracket 109 extending upwardly therefrom (toward the viewer of Fig. 5) and an eccentric cam 108 (Fig. 4) on a rock shaft 107 to which the handle 115 (Fig. 1) is secured. The aneroid .112 is supported on the cover plate 118 by a screw 124 and carries the adjustable stem 125. The suit exhaust valve 120 is carried by a ball head 88 of the stem 126. The stem is slidable in a combined seat and spider fitting 127. The suit valve 110 is carried by the stem 126 and is sealed relative thereto and relative to the housing 13 by a diaphragm 129. It is normally seated by a spring 128. It will be noted that the effective diameters of the seats 120 and 127 are the same, which, to-

gether with the overall design of the suit regulator provides the valve 110 of balanced character so that it has maximum sensitivity to all pressure changes.

The mask regulator MR (see Figs. 3, 4 and 8) is contained in a housing 140, bolted between a seat plate 141 and a cover plate 142. The seat plate is surrounded by a ring 143 interposed between the regulator housing 13 and the edge of the diaphragm 133, which in turn is interposed between the housing 140 and the ring 143.

An adjusting screw 138 is rotatable in the cover plate 142, and may be locked in position by a lock nut 144. A sleeve 145 is threaded on the adjusting screw and carries a laterally extending sheet metal plate 146 that serves as a backing for the spring 134. .A pin 147 guides the plate 146 and prevents its turning with the adjusting screw 138. The spring 134 is interposed between the plate 146 and a backing plate 148 for the diaphragm 133. The diaphragm 131 is retained in position by a retainer plate 149 and an actuating stem "150 extends "from it toward the backingplate 148.

Thepressure breather demand valve 130 isin the form of a ball as shown in Fig. 8, normally seated .against a seat of the seat. plate 141 by a spring 135 and a headed thrust pin 139 is located between it and the diaphragm 133. .The element 151 is a filter between the chambers .A and A. The port 111 from the chamber A to the chamber A is illustrated in Fig. 5 as .a hole drilled through the partition 12.

Practical operation Referring to Fig. 10, and first describing the operation of 'the diluter demand regulator, oxygen supplied t-o the inlet 21 at anywhere between 50 and 2000 p. s. i. may be admitted to the regulator by turning the oxygen sup- .ply lever 26 to the on position. Thereafter approxi- Upon a demand for oxygen in the chamber D caused by inhalation of the aviator, the reduced pressure in this chamber will be transmitted through the demand port 45 to the chamber .13 and act on the demand diaphragm 41 therein. This diaphragm will be depressed against the closing action of the spring '65 on the-demand valve 40, thus permitting a flow of oxygen through the valve 40 and into the chamber C, then'through the Venturi valve ornozzle '50 and the .hole 52 therein. If the required flow is in excess of the capacity of the hole 52plus the tension of the spring 54, the nozzle "50 will be lifted from the seat 5310 permit additional flow.

At the same time, providing the diluter control valve is open, atmospheric air will be drawnin through the ports '61 and the chambers E, F, and G, flowing through theport 81 and the Venturi sleeve 58 to the mask outlet 51. Thus the oxygen is diluted with atmospheric air passing throughthe check valve '70, which closes as soon as there is insufficient suction in the chamber F to overcome the tension of the spring 71. Thus reverse flow of oxygen to atmosphere through the ports 61 is prevented.

When the control handle 83 is in the Oxygen position (see Fig. l) the valve 30 is closed and no atmospheric air is mixed with the oxygen. When the altitude is great enough that the aneroid 62 is expanded until the diluter altitude valve 60 closes against the plate 63, 100% oxygen is then being inhaled. The aneroid '62 being adjustable may be set at the desired closing altitude-usually about 34,000 feet. Between about 10,000 and 34,000 feet then the air will be progressively choked on as the valve 60 approaches the seat 63 so as to vary the ratio of air-to-oxygen in this range with 100% oxygen being elfective only after closure of 60 against 63 at 34,000 feet.

Referring next to the suit regulator SR, its purpose is to pressure the flying suit of the aviator at unlimited altitudes. 'On increasing altitude the aneroid 112 expands until the stem 125 engages the exhaust valve seat 122 whereupon the aneroid moves the diaphragm-suspended seat until the seat engages the exhaust valve 120. Thereupon there is created a ready pressure in the chamber H by reason of this chamber being closed to atmosphere, the suit and the chamber H then being a closed system.

Thereafter further expansion of the aneroid 112 opens the suit valve against the action of the spring 128 with further increases in altitude, the aneroid exerting sufficient force toopen the balanced suit valve in response to demand and this pressurizes the suit through the suit outlet 121 at .a predetermined rate dependent upon the altitude affecting the aneroid 112 in opposition to the suit pressure in the chamber H on the reverse side of the diaphragm 113.

Reversely as altitude decreases the suit regulator first reduces the pressure in the suit by closing the valve 110 and 'thenopening the exhaust valve to permit escape of the suit pressure through the housing 116 at the port 123. Upon reduction in altitude the pressure in the suit is again regulated in proportion thereto by reason of the balance of pressures in the chamber H and in the aneroid 112. By suspending the seat 122 on the diaphragm 113 and connecting the valves 110 and 120 together by the stem 126, we are always assured that both valves will never be open simultaneously .and that upon movement in either direction by the stem 125 one will close before the other opens and vice versa with no possibility of an ntermediate position where the suit pressure could vary several pounds per square inch between the closing of one valve and the opening of the other. The suit pressure is thus always closely regulated in proportion to altitude changes.

In an emergency, or in order to test the action of pressurizing the suit, the handle 115 can beswung from the position shown in Fig. 1 to increase the tension of the spring 114 up to a point of maximum with the handle 115 rotated 180 degrees clockwise (indicated Increase), at which position the spring 114 is sufficiently compressed to have closed the exhaust valve 120 and opened the suit valve 110 to permit the aviator to determine that the pressure enters the suit properly. After test the handle 115 can be returned to the initial position for subsequent automatic operation in proportion to altitude,

as already described. Since the setting of the aneroid 112 is adjustable at the adjusting screw 125 the altitude at which the exhaust valve closes and the suit valve 110 commences to open can be set. This is usually between 35,000 and 40,000 feet.

With respect to the operation of the mask regulator MR, the pressure breather demand valve 130 is supplied with oxygen under about 35 p. s. i. from the chamber A. As the altitude increases and the suit regulator SR is activated, the pressure in chamber H acts on the diaphragm 131 thereby transmitting a force to diaphragm 133 through the actuating stem 150 and in turn to the thrust pin 139 which opens valve 130. Chamber K is vented to atmosphere through port 137. The relative areas of diaphragms 133 and 131 are at a predetermined ratio such as 5 to 1 so that the regulated pressure. in chamber J is one-fifth that in chamber H In this way the mask regulator comes into action as .a pressure breather only after the suit has been pressurized, atmospheric pressure acting on the diaphragm 133. Since the pressure in H and H would be too much if applied directly on the diaphragm 133, the area of the diaphragm 131 is made less as above pointed out. Additional adjustment is had through the tension of the spring 134 by adjustment as desired of the adjusting screw 138.

After the slack is taken up between the diaphragm 133 and the head of the thrust pin 139 the valve 130 is opened upon further increases in altitude as described above. This permits flow of the 35 p. s. i. of oxygen from chamber I through the passageway 136 to the space between the demand diaphragm 41 and the seal diaphragm 42. Pressurizing this space adds a load to the demand diaphragm 41, and therefore breathing is under pressure and additional oxygen is thereby delivered as a result of breathing under this pressure, as compared with ambient pressure from sea level up to 30,000 or 40,000 feet at which the aneroid 112 is set.

When altitude again reduces and the valve 130 closes, the pressure in the chamber J and in the space between the diaphragms 41 and 42 is gradually relieved through a leak port 43 of the demand diaphragm 41 into the chamber B where it can be utilized for inhalation.

From the foregoing specification it will be obvious that our combination mask and suit regulators pressurize both the flying suit and the breathing mask or helmet at unlimited altitudes. By utilizing the pressure that goes to the suit for pressurizing the diaphragm 131 of the mask regulator, the energy of the compressed oxygen is utilized to open the valve 130 proportionally under regulation of the diaphragm 133 as it responds to the pressure in chamber J. Figs. 1 to 9 illustrate one form of practical apparatus that can be used to secure the relationship of parts illustrated diagrammatically in Fig. 10 and which will operate in the intended manner for regulating the mask and suit pressures.

Various changes may be made in the structural details and certain relationships of the parts of our combination mask and suit regulator may be varied as well as the interarrangement of parts without departing from the real spirit and purpose of our invention. It is our intention therefore to cover by our claims any modified forms of structure or use of mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

We claim as our invention:

1. In combination mask and suit regulators for a diluter demand oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, a suit regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber communicating with a suit for pressurizing the suit, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for closing said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and thereupon moving both discs for immediately opening said suit valve upon further increase above said degree, said diaphragm forming one wall of said suit regulator chamber and thereby responsive on one side thereof to the pressure therein and in the suit, and responsive on the other side thereof to atmosphere, spring means for acting on said diaphragm to bias said exhaust valve seat toward said exhaust valve disc, manually operable means to apply and increase the force of said spring means to close said exhaust valve and open said suit valve, a mask regulator comprising a housing having a first chamber communieating with said demand diaphragm to pressurize the same, a pressure breather valve seat between said firststage chamber and said first chamber, said demand diaphragm having a leak opening therein from said first chamber to the demand diaphragm chamber, a first diaphragm responsive on one sideto pressure from said first chamber, said diaphragm being responsive on the other side thereof to atmospheric pressure, a pressure breather valve disc normally seated on said pressure breather valve disc seat and operatively connected with said first diaphragm to be spaced thereby from said pressure breather valve seat upon response of said first diaphragm to predetermined ditferential of pressures between that in said first chamber and to atmospheric pressure, a second diaphragm responsive on one side to atmospheric pressure and on its other side to pressure from said suit regulator chamber, said second diaphragm opposing said first diaphragm to unseat said pressure breather valve disc from said pressure breather valve seat and to regulate the action thereof on said pressure breather valve disc proportional to altitude, and adjustable spring means acting on said first and second diaphragms and tending to open said pressure breather valve.

2. In combination mask and suit regulators for a diluter demand oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, a suit regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber communicating with a suit for pressurizing the suit, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve'seat, altitude responsive means for closing said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and thereupon moving both discs for immediately opening said assigns pressure therein and in the suit, and responsive on the other side thereof to atmosphere, a mask regulator comprising a housing having a first chamber communicating with said demand diaphragm to pressurize the same, a pressure breather valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said first chamber, said demand diaphragm having a leak opening therein from said first chamber to the demand diaphragm chamber, a first diaphragm responsive on one side to pressure from said first chamber, said diaphragm being responsive on the other side thereof to atmospheric pressure, and a second diaphragm responsive on one side to atmospheric pressure and on its other side to pressure from said suit regulator chamber, said second diaphragm opposing said first diaphragm to open said pressure breather valve and to regulate the action thereof proportional to altitude,

3. In mask and suit regulators of the character disclosed for a diluter demand oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, a suit regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamher for communication with a suit for pressurizing it, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for closing said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and thereupon moving both discs for opening said suit valve upon increase above said degree, normally inoperable spring means operable to bias said exhaust valve closed and said suit valve open, manually controlled means to render said spring means operable, a mask regulator comprising a housing having a first chamber communicating with said demand diaphragm to pressurize the same, a pressure breather valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said first chamber, said demand diaphragm having a leak opening therein from said first chamber to the demand diaphragm chamber, means responsive on one side to pressure from said suit regulator chamber, said means being responsive on the other side thereof to atmospheric pressure, a pressure breather valve disc normally seated on said pressure breather valve disc seat and operatively connected with said first means to be spaced thereby from said pressure breather valve seat upon response of said first means to predetermined differential of pressures between that in said first chamber and atmospheric pressure, a second means responsive on one side to atmospheric pressure and on its other side to pressure from said suit regulator chamber, said first and second means unseating said pressure breather valve disc from said pressure breather valve seat and regulating the action thereof proportional to altitude, and adjustable spring means acting on said first and second means and tending to unseat said pressure breather valve disc from its seat.

4. In mask and suit regulators of the character disclosed for a diluter demand oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, a suit regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber for communication with a suit for pressurizing it, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for closing said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and thereupon moving both discs for opening said suit valve upon increase above said degree, a mask regulator com prising a housing having a first chamber communicating with said demand diaphragm to pressurize .the same, a pressure breather valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said first chamber, said demand diaphragm having a leak opening therein from said first chamber to the demand diaphragm chamber, means responsive on one side to pressure from said suit regulator chamber, said means being responsive on the other side thereof toatmospheric pressure, and a second means responsive on one side to atmospheric pressure and on its other side ItO pressure from said suit regulator chamber, said first and second unseating said pressure breather valve disc from said pressure breather valve seat and regulating the action thereof on said pressure breather valve disc proportional to altitude.

5. Combination mask and suit regulators for an oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm comprising a suit regulator having a housing provided with a suit regulator chamber therein communicating with a suit for pressurizing the same, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for seating said exhaust valve seat on said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for opening said suit valve disc relative to said suit valve seat upon further increase of altitude, said valves being responsive to the pressure in the suit in opposition to atmospheric pressure to regulate the pressure to the suit in proportion to altitude, spring means to act on said valves to bias the exhaust valve seated and the suit valve unseated, manually operable means to apply and increase the force of said spring means, a mask regulator comprising a housing having a first chamber communicating with-the demand diaphragm to pressurize the same, a pressure breather valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said first chamber of said mask regulator, said demand diaphragm having a leak opening therein, a pressure breather valve disc, said mask regulator having a diaphragm responsive on one side to pressure from said suit regulator chamber for unseating said pressure breather valve disc relative to said pressure breather valve seat, said last diaphragm being responsive on the other side thereof to atmospheric pressure, and pressure-responsive means responding to the pressure in said first chamber of said mask regulator and differentially to atmosphere for regulating the action of said first diaphragm on said pressure breather Valve disc proportional to altitude.

6. Combination mask and suit regulators for an oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm comprising a suit regulator having a housing provided with a suit regulator chamber therein communicating with a suit for pressurizing the same, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous mov ment, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for closing said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for unseating said suit valve disc from said suit valve seat upon further increase of altitude, said valves being responsive to the pressure in the suit in opposition to atmospheric pressure to regulate pressure to the suit in proportion to altitude, a mask regulator comprising a housing having a first chamber communicating with the demand diaphragm to pressurize the same, a pressure breather valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said first chamber of said mask regulator, said demand diaphragm having a leak opening drerein, said mask regulator having a diaphragm responsive on one side to pressure from said suit regulator chamber, a pressure breather valve disc actuated thereby, said last diaphragm being responsive on the other side thereof to atmospheric pressure, and pressureresponsive means responding to the pressure in said first chamber of said mask regulator and differentially to atmosphere for regulating the action of said first diaphragm on said pressure breather valve disc proportional to altitude.

7. Combination mask and suit regulators for an oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm comprising a suit regulator having a housing provided with a first chamber therein communicating with a suit for pressurizing the same, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said first chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said first chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for closing said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for unseating said suit valve disc from said suit valve seat upon increase in altitude above said degree, said valves being responsive'to the pressure in the suit in opposition to atmospheric pressure to regulate the pressure to the suit in proportion to altitude, a mask regulator comprising a housing having a first chamber communicating with the demand diaphragm to pressurize the same, a pressure breather valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said first chamber of said mask regulator, said demand diaphragm having a leak opening therein to the demand chamber of said oxygen regulator, a diaphragm, a pressure breather valve disc actuated thereby, said diaphragm being responsive on one side to pressure from said first chamber of said suit regulator and on the other side thereof to atmospheric pressure, and pressure-responsive means responding to the pressure in said first chamber of said suit regulator and differentially to atmospheric pressure for regulating the action of said first diaphragm on said pressure breather valve disc proportional to altitude.

8. In a suit regulator for a diluter demand oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, said suit regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber communicating with a suit for pressurizing it, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, 2. diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for closing said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve seat upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for unseating said suit valve disc from said suit valve seat upon increase above said degree, a diaphragm forming one wall of said suit regulator chamber and thereby responsive on one side thereof to the pressure thereinand in the suit and responsive on the other side thereof to atmosphere, said exhaust valve seat being carried by said diaphragm, spring means to act on said diaphragm to bias said exhaust valve seat toward said exhaust valve disc, and manually operable means to selectively render the force of said spring effective.

9. In a suit regulator for a diluter demand oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, said suit regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber communicating with a suit for pressurizing it, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for seating said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for unseating said suit valve disc from said suit valve seat upon increase above said degree, and a diaphragm forming one wall of said suit regulator chamber and thereby responsive on one side thereof to the pressure therein and in the suit and responsive on the other side thereof to atmosphere.

10. In a suit regulator for a diluter demand oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, said suit regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber communicating with a suit for pressurizing it, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and at-' mosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude respon sive means for seating said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for unseating said suit valve disc from said suit valve seat upon increase above said degree, and a diaphragm forming one wall of said suit regulator chamber and thereby responsive on one side thereof to the pressure therein and in the suit and responsive on the other side thereof to atmosphere, a said exhaust valve seat being carried by said diaphragm.

11. In a regulator for use in connection with an oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, said regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber communicating with a suit for pressurizing the same, a suit valve seat between said first-stage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for seating said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon an increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for unseating said suit valve disc from said suit valve seat upon increase above said degree, a diaphragm forming one wall of said suit regulator chamber and thereby responsive on one side thereof to the pressure therein and in the suit and responsive on the other side thereof to atmosphere, said exhaust valve seat being carried by said diaphragm, spring means to act on said diaphragm to bias said exhaust valve seat toward said exhaust valve disc, and manually operable means to apply and increase the force of said spring means to seat said exhaust valve seat and unseat said suit valve disc.

12. In a regulator for use in connection with an oxygen regulator having a first-stage chamber and a demand diaphragm, said regulator comprising a housing having a suit regulator chamber communicating with a suit for pressurizing the same, a suit valve seat between said firststage chamber and said suit regulator chamber, an exhaust valve seat between said suit regulator chamber and atmosphere, a suit valve disc and an exhaust valve disc connected together for simultaneous movement, a diaphragm carrying said exhaust valve seat, altitude responsive means for seating said exhaust valve seat against said exhaust valve disc upon an increase in altitude to a predetermined degree and for unseating said suit valve disc from said suit valve seat upon increase above said degree, and a diaphragm forming one wall of said suit regulator chamber and thereby responsive on one side thereof to the pressure therein andin the suit and responsive on the other side thereof to atmosphere, said exhaust valve seat being carried by said diaphragm.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,390,233 Akerman et a1 Dec. 4, 1945 2,418,034 Kizaur Mar. 25, 1947 2,619,959 Holmes Dec. 2, 1952 2,703,572 Seeler Mar. 8, 1955

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2969801 *Jan 17, 1958Jan 31, 1961Firewel Dev CompanyRegulator
US3037502 *May 21, 1956Jun 5, 1962Lockheed Aircraft CorpRespiratory device
US3060933 *Jan 24, 1957Oct 30, 1962Gasaccumulator Svenska AbArrangement for controlling the supply of gas to a breathing device
US3077881 *Apr 1, 1957Feb 19, 1963Bendix CorpHigh altitude suit and mask oxygen regulator
US3179119 *Jun 5, 1961Apr 20, 1965Normalair LtdBreathing apparatus
US3358680 *Jun 3, 1963Dec 19, 1967SpirotechniqueBreathing apparatus with control means for the inhaled gas mixture
US3358681 *Oct 22, 1965Dec 19, 1967SpirotechniqueBreathing apparatus with control means for the inhaled gas mixture
US6837239 *Jul 22, 2002Jan 4, 2005Safety Equipment Australia Pty Ltd.Ventilation system for a protective suit
US20030024529 *Jul 22, 2002Feb 6, 2003Safety Equipment Sweden AbVentilation system for a protective suit
US20060084992 *Nov 8, 2005Apr 20, 2006Michelson Gary KTubular member having a passage and opposed bone contacting extensions
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/202.11
International ClassificationA62B9/02, A62B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62B9/022
European ClassificationA62B9/02D