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Publication numberUS2837132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 3, 1958
Filing dateSep 7, 1956
Priority dateSep 7, 1956
Publication numberUS 2837132 A, US 2837132A, US-A-2837132, US2837132 A, US2837132A
InventorsHerbert Daust
Original AssigneeHerbert Daust
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulated hand bag
US 2837132 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 3, 1958 H. DAUsT :NSULATED HAND BAG Filed sept. '7, 1956 I NvENToR. HERBERT DAL/5T ATTORNEYS This invention relates generally to improvements in a hand bag, and more particularly to a hand bag of a Vtype adapted to carry articles for infant care, such as diapers and nursing bottles, when traveling or away from home.v

An important object is realized in an improved con- 'struction of hand bags formed principally of iiexible material with insulating interliners for the protection and temperature maintenance of articles disposed within the bag.

Another important objective is achieved by the provi-y sion of a pocket-forming assembly within the flexible covering of the bag, the assembly defining the shape and size of the pocket and serving to reenforce and maintain the shape of the hand bag.

- Other important advantages are realized by disposing the pocket-forming assembly which includes a stiff panel `and attached insulating layer within the flexible covering Afree from attachment to the covering or other element of 'the hand bag structure, such arrangement facilitating assembly of the bag and realizing more economical manufacture.

Still another important objective is afforded by the provision of stiff flanges attached to opposed lateral margins of the top opening in the covering, the stiff flanges extending internally of the bag between the lateral panel portions of the pocket-forming assembly and engaging ysuch panel portions to prevent collapse of the assembly when a sack-like inner liner is extended out of the top opening for cleaning purposes and to assure reinsertion of the liner between the panel portions.

The foregoing and numerous other objects and advantages of the invention will more clearly appear from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment,

particularly when considered in connection with the ac-V companying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a hand bag embodying the features of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary, cross sectional View as seen along line`2- 2 of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a sectional View through a fragmentary end portion -of the bag, as indicated by section line 3 3 of Fig. l, and

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional View of the bag similar to Fig. 2, but showing the inner liner extended through the top opening for cleaning purposes.

The reference numeral generally designates the hand bag which is seen to comprise a generally rectangular body having a carrying strap 11 attached to the top end portions thereof. Y The bag body is made up of an outer or covering envelope of fabric or plastic sheet material suitably cut and stitched to form sides 12 and 13 and integral bottom 14, and ends 15 and 16. The side and end members have their contiguous marginal portions inturned and stitched together, as indicated at 17in Fig. 3.

The top of the bag is formed by the inwardly and downwardly turned upper margins of side panels 12 and Patented June 3, 1958 ice 2 l 13, and by tape members 20 and 21 of a slide fastener or zipper type of closing unit indicated generally at 22. The attached margins of side panels 12 and 13 with tape members 20 and 21 constitute opposed lateral margins 23 of a top `opening for the bag.

Normally located within the covering of the hand bag is an independent pocket-forming assembly generally indicated at 24 in Fig. 4. The pocket-forming assembly 24 consists of la substantially U-shaped panel 25 formed of a relatively stiff lsheet material, the panel 25 including spaced opposed lateral panel portions 26 and integral lower bridging piece 27. Attached to the outer, surface of panel 25 is an insulating layer 30 of cornpressible fibre glass wool. The pocket-forming assembly 24, comprised of U-shaped panel 25 and attached insulating layer 36, is considered a separate independent element havingV no positive attachment to the liexible outer covering or any other element of the hand bag', thc pocket-forming assembly 24 being insertable into the outer covering of the hand bag in a manner and for purposes which are hereinafter fully described.

The bag is provided with a sack-like inner liner 31 which is secured along itsy upper edge to the downwardly turned top margins of the side panels 12 and 13 and the fastener tapes 21 and 20. The liner 31 is otherwise unattached and hence it can be turned inside out by drawing it outwardly through the bag opening to expose the liner surface for cleaning and airing. The liner 31 includes a pair of moisture-resistant side portions 32, preferably formed of plastic sheeting, secured together along a longitudinal seam 33.

The pocket-forming assembly 24 is placed within the covering of the hand bag before seam 33 is closed. For example, with .the zipper 22 open and with the seam 33 of liner portions 32 open, the pocket-forming assembly 24 is insertable between the liner portions 32, through the top opening of the -bag and thence into the interior of the outer covering. It is possible to insert pocketf-orming assembly 24 in this manner because the width of bridging panel piece 27 is slightly less than the width of the top opening yof the bag and because the insulating layer 30 is highly compressible.

When disposed within the covering of the bag, the insulating layer 30 vof the pocket-forming assembly is located between the outer flexible covering `and stiff U- shaped panel 25. The panel portions 26 extend upwardly to the top of the bag closely adjacent the lateral margins of the top opening, and extend substantially to each end 15 and 16, thus the relatively stili panel 25 serves to maintain the shape of the hand bag and in addition defines the shape and size of the pocket. It will 'be par' ticularly noted that the pocket-forming assembly 25 is completely unattached to the 'covering or other yelement `of the hand bag. The insulating layer 3i) completely surrounds the pocket formed yby stilf panel 25 except at each extreme end, and hence serves to maintain the temperature of articles disposed within such pocket. i

Attached at each of the opposed lateral, margins 23 Iof the top "opening is a flange 34 comprised of relatively stiif sheet material, the ange 34 extending downwardly into the pocket formed by U-shaped panel 25. In the preferred construction, the flanges 34 extend substantially the length of the pocket. The flanges 34 extend downwardly to engage the lateral panel portions 26 and hence keep such panel portions 26 at the sides of the top opening, the advantages of which will appear later.

After the stiff anges 34 are attached to the 1opposed lateral margins of the top opening, the seam 33 of sacklike liner 31 is closed by stitching and the liner inserted into the pocket formed by stiff panel 24, as is shown in Fig. 2. The liner 31 overlies the stiff flanges 34 and is not attached thereto except at the upper end at the side margins 23 ofthe top opening.

Assuming for example that it is desired to clean the waterproof liner 31, the zipper 22 is opened and the liner 31 is drawn outwardly through the top opening, as is illustrated in Fig. 4. Because `oi the extremely ilexible nature of the outer covering of the hand bag, the pocket-forming assembly 24 might collapse if it were not for the presence of stili flanges 3ft. In other words, if flanges 34 were not present and if the sack-like liner 31 were extended, it might 'be possible for one or both of the panel portions 26 with its connected insulated layer 30 to move in a direction toward the other panel portion 26 and block the top opening of the bag. lf this situation occurred, it is apparent that there would be no assurance that the sack-like liner 31 could or would be reinsertable into the pocket formed by stii panel 25, but

rather the liner 31 could be accidentally inserted into the covering at the side of `one or the other ofthe lateral panel Portions 26.

However, it will be noted that in the instant hand bag structure, when the liner 31 is extended out of the top opening, the stili anges 34 engage the stiff panel portions 26 and retain such panel portions at opposite sides of the top Opening. Thus it is absolutely assured that the liner 31 after being aired and cleaned, will ,be repositioned into the pocket formed bystit panel25.

Although the invention has been described by making detailed reference to a single preferred embodiment, such detail is to be understood in an instructive, rather than in any restrictive sense, many variants being possible within the scope of the claims hereunto appended.

I claim as my invention:

l. A hand bag comprising an outer covering ofvpliable sheet material having a top opening and slide fastener means for closing said opening, a'pocket assembly located within said covering, said pocket assembly including a pocket-forming panel of stil sheet material, an insulating layer attached to the pocket-forming panel and located between the panel andsaid covering, :flanges of stiff sheet material secured to the covering along opposed side margins of said top opening, said stiff vilanges extending downwardly` internally of the pocket forming panel, and a sack-like liner of flexible waterproof material secured to the covering at the margin of said opening and normally disposed internally of said pocketaforming panel in overlying relation to said stit flanges.

2. A hand bag comprising an outer covering of pliable sheet material having a top opening and slide fastener means for closing said opening, a pocket assembly located within said covering, said pocket assembly including a pocket-forming panel of stiff sheet material having spaced lateral panel portions located at opposite sides of said top opening, an insulating layer attached to the pocket-forming panel and located between the panel and said covering, the stiff pocket-forming panel and insulating layer being free from attachment to said covering, anges of stiff sheet material secured to the covering at opposed side margins of said top opening, said stili flanges extending downwardly internally of the pocket-forming panel, and a sack-like liner of flexible waterproof material secured to the covering at the margin of said opening and normally disposed internally of said pocket-forming panel in overlying relation to said sti flanges, the liner being extensible out of the panel and top opening for cleaning, the stiff anges engaging said lateral panel portions to prevent collapse of the pocket-forming panel and to assure reinsertion of the liner between the lateral panel portions.

3. A hand bag comprising an outer covering of pliable sheet material having a top opening and slide fastener means for closing said opening, a pocket assembly located within said covering, said pocket assembly including a substantially U-shaped pocket-forming panel of stii sheet material, said panel having spaced lateral panel portions extending substantially the length of the bag and extending upwardly substantially to the top of the bag adjacent opposed side margins of said top Opening, an insulating layer attached to the pocket-forming panel and located between the panel andsaid covering, flanges of stit sheet material secured to the covering along opposed side margins of said top opening, saidstitf flanges extending downwardly internally of the U-shaped pockettorniing panel, and a sack-like liner of flexible waterproof material secured to the covering at the margin of said opening and normally disposed internally of said pocketforming panel in overlying relation to said stift flanges,

,the liner being extensible out' of the top opening for cleaning, the stift anges engaging said lateral panel portions to preventcollapse of the U-shaped pocket-forming panel and to assure the insertion of the liner between the lateral panel portions, the U-shaped pocket-forming panel and insulating layer being free from attachment to said covering.

4. A hand bag comprising an outer covering of pliable sheet material having a top opening and slide fastener means for closing said opening, a pocket assembly located within said covering, said pocket assembly including a pocket-forming panel of stiff sheet material having spaced lateral panel portions located at opposite sides of the said top opening, van insulating layer attached to the pocketforrning panel and located between the panel and said covering, flanges of stit sheet material secured to the covering along opposed side margins of said top opening, said stift ilanges extending downwardly internally of the pocket-forming panel, and a sack-like liner of ilexible waterproof material secured to the covering atthe margin of said opening, said liner having a seam through which the pocket-forming assembly of panel and insulating layer is inserted into the covering before seam closure, the stiff pocket-forming panel and insulating layer being free-from attachment to said covering, said liner being normally disposed internally of said pocket-forming panelin overlying relation to said stiff tlanges, and being extensible out of the top opening for cleaning purposes.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED sTATEs PATENTS 2,289,254 Eagles July 7, 1942, 2,575,191 Seipp Nov, 13, 1951 2,575,893 Seaman Nov. 20, 1951 2,661,785 Daust Dec. 8,1953l 2,667,198 Klein Ian. 26, 1954 2,759,617 Gauthier Aug.'21, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2289254 *Oct 18, 1940Jul 7, 1942Luella EaglesPortable refrigerator bag
US2575191 *Mar 8, 1948Nov 13, 1951George A SeippCollapsible insulated refrigerator bag for carrying articles to be chilled
US2575893 *Nov 14, 1949Nov 20, 1951Norman R SeamanCollapsible heat-insulated container
US2661785 *Jun 2, 1952Dec 8, 1953Herbert DaustInsulated handbag
US2667198 *Jan 26, 1951Jan 26, 1954Klein Walter LReceptacle
US2759617 *Oct 18, 1955Aug 21, 1956Grace GauthierContainer for a baby's bottle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3073367 *Jun 24, 1958Jan 15, 1963Ferris A SamaraFoldable bag and the like
US3292680 *Dec 15, 1965Dec 20, 1966Buxton IncBuoyant key case
US4112991 *Nov 30, 1977Sep 12, 1978Acricite Company, Inc.Convertible handbag
US5494157 *Nov 14, 1994Feb 27, 1996Samsonite CorporationComputer bag with side accessible padded compartments
US6783016 *Mar 29, 2002Aug 31, 2004Grace WangContainer with collapsible loops
US7322748 *Sep 19, 2000Jan 29, 2008Richard RubinInsulated food container
US7828027 *Sep 3, 2008Nov 9, 2010Ingenious Designs, LlcReversible tote
US20080142128 *Dec 19, 2006Jun 19, 2008Kaung-Ti YungFlower-shaped bag
US20090056843 *Sep 3, 2008Mar 5, 2009Ingenious Designs, LlcReversible tote
US20110233084 *Jan 13, 2011Sep 29, 2011Watson Christopher MStorage System for Archery Equipment and Accessories
US20140144562 *Nov 23, 2012May 29, 2014Shane HillardMini Ball Or Mini Car Shaped Money Holder
USRE42311Feb 28, 2008Apr 26, 2011Richard RubinInsulated food container
Classifications
U.S. Classification150/118, 383/110, 190/119, 383/113, 383/111
International ClassificationA45C11/20
Cooperative ClassificationA45C11/20
European ClassificationA45C11/20