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Publication numberUS2838198 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 10, 1958
Filing dateJan 26, 1956
Priority dateJan 26, 1956
Publication numberUS 2838198 A, US 2838198A, US-A-2838198, US2838198 A, US2838198A
InventorsVidal Eugene L
Original AssigneeVidal Eugene L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reinforced box
US 2838198 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. L. VIDAL REINFORCED BOX June 10, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 26, 1956 INVENTOR EUGENE L.V|DAL BY Q MQ H IS ATTORNEYS June 10, 1958 E. L. VIVDAL 2,838,19 8

REINFORCED BOX Filed Jan. 26, 1956 FIG.4. TV Q? 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I 1 s I /5 I4 I 20 I6 J J l 2/ /0 22 r PIC-3.6.

lla 4H2 1 INVENTOR l5 FIG] EUGENE L.V|DAL HISATTORNEYS United States Patent REINFORCED BOX Eugene L. Vidal, Avon, Conn.

Application January 26, 1956, Serial No. 561,489

7 Claims. (Cl. 220-19 This invention relates to a new construction for a portable receptacle or tote box.

The construction of the present invention affords a lightweight and inexpensive receptacle or tote box which is of exceptional rigidity and stur'diness, notwithstanding the fact that it may be open at top. The'exceptional rigidity is imparted to the receptacle by a design in which the reinforced base is extended upwardly for the support of a rectangular frame which forms the upper open end of the receptacle. The design of the receptacle is such that it is easily handled because it may be so readily and conveniently gripped at different places.

A further feature of the design is that the receptacles may be compactly stacked one on top of another. To facilitate stacking, the base of the receptacle is constructed to nest on top of the receptacle beneath it, but only when the base of the upper receptacle is properly registered or aligned in relation to the upper edge of the lower receptacle.

In its preferred form, the portable receptacle of the present invention is of wire or rod openwork construction and open at the top. Conventional receptacles of this type of construction are ordinarily not suited for rugged use because they are so easily bent and damaged, unless, of course, very heavy material is employed in the construction, in which case the advantages of lightweight construction are sacrificed. Because of the unique construction, particularly at the corners, the receptacle of the present invention is stronger and more durable than conventional receptacles of substantially greater weight.

For a complete description of the present invention, reference may be had to the detailed description which follows and to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is an isometric representation of the receptacle of the present invention; 7

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the corner construction of the receptacle; 1

Figure 3 is across-section view taken in a vertical plane through one of the sides of the receptacle illustrating the manner in which the receptacles interlock when stacked one on top of another;

Figure 4 is a plan view of the receptacle;

Figure 5 is a rear elevation view thereof;

Figure 6 is a cross-section view taken along the line 66 of Figure 4 looking in the direction of the arrows; and a Figure 7 illustrates an alternative, corner construction of the present invention.

Referring to the drawings, particularly to Figure 1, the portable receptacle of the present invention comprises a rectangular frame 10 which forms the upper edge of the receptacle, and a plurality of runner-like members 11,12 having upturned ends 11a, 12a, respectively, which support the rectangular frame. vTherunner-like members 11 form the sides, the runner-like members 12 form the front and rear, and the upturned ends 11a and 12a form the corners of the receptacle.

Intermediate the upturned ends, the runner-like members 11, 12 extend generally horizontally. The runner -mernbers 11 forming the sides of the receptacle, however, are each bent to form front and rear legs 21 and 22, respectively, which extend below the horizontal portions of the runner members 12. The front and rear legs 21, 22 serve to support the receptacle on the ground and, as will be explained below, these legs are also of particular advantage in facilitating the stacking of the receptacles. The runner members 12, therefore, do not rest upon the ground. However, as will be explained below, they serve to support the receptacle when it is stacked on top of another receptacle of the same construction.

It may be mentioned at this point that the runner members 11 are each disposed parallel to but inboard of the corresponding side leg of the rectangular frame 10 (that is to say, inboard. of a vertical fore-and-aft plane through the side legs of the rectangular frame 10). Figure 3 clearly illustrates that the runner member 11 is disposed beneath and inside its correspondingleg of the rectangular frame 10. Also, the length of the runners 11 intermediate their upturned ends is less than the length of the corresponding side legs of the rectangular frame so that, when stacked, the legs 21, 22 of the runner members 11 may be received snugly within the open top of the lower receptacle. The runner members 12 extend parallel to and preferably slightly inboard of the corresponding'legs of the rectangular frame 10, and the length of each of the runner'members 12 exceeds the length of said corresponding leg of the rectangular frame, so

that when stacked the runner members 12 cross and rest 'upon the side legs of the rectangular frame 10 of the lower receptacle- The significance of these relationships will be more readily apparent when the manner of stacking the receptacles is described.

A bent rod 14 extends horizontally along the sides and rear of the receptacle at a height intermediate the rectangular frame 10 and the bases of'the runner members 11, 12. The rod 14 serves not only as a barrier to contain articles within the receptacle, but also as a support for the ends of a liner 15 (indicated in phantom lines).

.The rod 14 may be eliminated from the front of the receptacle so that articles may be removed through the open front when a plurality of receptacles are stacked one on top of another.

The liner 15 may be made of plastic, cardboard or other material; The ends thereof may be conveniently suspended from the bar 14 at the sides and the rear of the receptacle and, if desired, the front of the plastic liner may be attached to the base of the member 12 at the front of the receptacle.

If desired, a stiff board or sheet may serve as the bottom of the receptacle with or without the liner 15.

Also, if desired, one or more reinforcement posts 17 Y may be connected between the rectangular frame 10 and the horizontal base portions of the U-shaped' members 11, 12 for added rigidity.

Crossed diagonal rods or bars 19 are suspended between the horizontal portions of the-front and rear turned ends 12a of the front runner member 12. Itis disposed at a height just slightly above the base or horizontal portion of the runner member 12 to preventthe articles from accidentally falling from thereceptacle, such I These crossed bars also as by sliding. The bar 16, therefore, serves as a barrier over which the articles may be lifted to remove them from the receptacle. If preferred, the front edge of the liner 15 may be attached to the horizontal bar 15 instead of to the runner member 12.

The unique corner construction of the receptacle is an extremely important feature of the invention. The corner construction extends the rigidity from the reinforced base of the receptacle upwardly for the support of the rectangular frame 10. The construction imparts ex ceptional rigidity to the receptacle which, in turn, or it possible to withstand considerable abuse without becoming damaged or unusable by loss of shape or ability to be stacked. The corner construction is best shown in Figure 2 of the drawings. The upturned ends Lia, 12a of adjacent ends of the runner members 13, 12 are joined or welded at their extreme upper ends, as at a and b, to different sides or legs of the rectangular frame 1;). Furthermore, the horizontal base portion of the runner member 12 is joined or welded, as at c, to the upstanding leg 11a of the runner member The connection c is so disposed with respect to the connections a and b that lines connecting the three points would form an acute triangle. it is apparent, therefore, that the construction provides eight separate points of support for the rectangular frame 10, and it is further apparent that the construction is capable of withstanding without deformation not only vertical loads, but loads, including shocl; loads caused by impact or dropping, at angles to the vertical direction.

The receptacles of the present invention are readily stacked one on top of another .in proper registration. When in proper registration, the legs 21, 22 of the runner members 11 of the upper receptacle are snugly received (with some clearance, if desired) just inside the side legs of the rectangular frame of the lower receptacle, thereby registering the upper receptacle transversely in relation to the lower receptacle, and the upturned ends 11a of the runner members are snugly received (with some clearance, if desired) between the front and rear legs of the rectangular frame it of the lower receptacle, thereby registering the upper receptacle in a fore-and-aft direction in relation to the lower receptacle. When the upper receptacle is thus properly registered, the extended portions of the horizontal front and rear runnerlike members 12 will cross and sit on top of the side legs of the rectangular frame 10 of the receptacle beneath it.

The curvature in the side runner members 11, which forms the front and rear legs 21, 22, respectively, is also of advantage in stacking the receptacles, particularly at heights, in that it is convenient first to register the rearward legs 22 of the receptacle inside the side legs of the rectangular frame 10 of the lower receptacle. When the legs 22 are so positioned, the receptacle is properly registered transversely. The rear end of the receptacle will be supported by the engagement of the rear runner member 12 with the side legs of the rectangular frame, since, as mentioned above, the members 12 are longer than the front and rear legs of the rectangular frame. The receptacle may then be pushed or slid rearwardly along the legs forming the upper side edges of the lower receptacle until the receptacle is registered in a fore-and-aft direction with the lower receptacle, in which position the front legs 21 of the receptacle drop behind the upper front edge of the lower receptacle and the front runner member 12 comes to rest thereon. This interlocking construction of the receptacles, therefore, insures that they will be stacked one on top of another in proper registration.

It may also be observed that' the corner construction of the receptacle, in addition to imparting strength to the receptacle, is very conveniently gripped by hand because of the separation between upturned ends 11a, 12a of the runner members 11, 12. Of course, it is apparent that in addition to being conveniently gripped at the corners,

4 l the receptacle may also be conveniently grasped, even with the liner installed, by the legs of the upper frame 10, or by any of the horizontal runners 11, 12, or by any combination of the foregoing. One or more hooks may be used in handling the receptacle.

An alternative embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in Figure 7, wherein the upturned ends 11a, 12a of the runner members H, 1.2, respectively, are connected at their extreme upper ends to different legs of the upper frame it). For example, the upturned ends 11:: of the members 11 are connected to the front and rear legs of the frame 10 instead of to the side legs thereof, and the upturned ends 12a of the members 12 are connected to the side legs of the frame 10 instead of to the front and rear legs thereof.

The invention has been shown in preferred forms and by way of example only, and obviously many modifications and variations may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention. For example, the number of sides of the receptacle may be increased, if desired. The invention, therefore, is not to be limited to any specified form of embodiment, except in so far as such limitations are set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A receptacle comprising a rectangular frame forming the upper edge of the receptacle, an elongated hori zontally disposed member below and extending parallel to each leg of the rectangular frame, each of said members having upturned ends for supporting the rectangular frame, the upturned ends of each member being connected to the corresponding leg of the rectangular frame to which it is parallel, adjacent members being connected together adjacent their ends below the connections between the upturned ends of the members.

2. A receptacle as set forth in claim 1 wherein the upturned ends of each elongated member form an acute angle with the intermediate portion of the elongated member.

3. A receptacle as set forth in claim 1 wherein two of said members on opposite sides of the receptacle are disposed below their adjacent members, the lengths of said two members between their upturned ends being shorter than the corresponding legs of the rectangular frame, each of said two members being offset inwardly from a vertical plane passing through the corresponding leg of the rectangular frame, whereby, when one receptacle is, stacked on top of another, said two members will serve to register the upper receptacle in both transverse and fore-and-aft directions relative to the lower rcceptacle, while the other two members support the receptacle on top of the lower receptacle.

4. A receptacle as set forth in claim 1 including rcinforcing means extending diagonally between said members, said reinforcing means serving to impart rigidity to the base of the receptacle.

5. A receptacle as set forth in claim 1 including barrier means extending between the upturned ends of the member disposed at the front of the receptacle, the height of said barrier means preventing articles from accidentally falling from the receptacle but nevertheless permitting articles to be raised above said barrier means to efiect their removal through an opening in the front of the receptacle defined by the barrier, the corresponding leg of the rectangular frame and the two upturned ends between which the barrier extends.

6. A receptacle as set forth in claim 3 wherein the said other two members are longer intermediate their upturned ends than the respective legs of the rectangular member.

7. A receptacle as set forth in claim 3 wherein each of the lower members is bent to form front and rear legs therein.

(References on following page) 5 References Cited in the file of this patent 2,606,683

UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,334,825 Jones Nov. 23, 1943 2,438,030 Bitney Mar. 16, 1948 5 2,529,267 Sloane Nov. 7, 1950 1072 572 2,585,428 Bitney Feb. 12, 1952 6 Rudd Aug. 12, 1952 Russell Feb. 28, 1956 Kaye July 16, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS France .Q. Mar. 17, 1954

Patent Citations
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US2438030 *Dec 7, 1945Mar 16, 1948Union Steel Prod CoTransporting and storage crate
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US2585428 *Oct 30, 1946Feb 12, 1952Union Steel Prod CoClothesbasket
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3098488 *Mar 31, 1958Jul 23, 1963Herbert SchnelieFile support
US3197031 *Mar 30, 1964Jul 27, 1965Formed Tubes IncTransportable racks
US3317075 *May 3, 1965May 2, 1967Drader Clarence HCarrier for milk cartons
US4593825 *Jun 7, 1985Jun 10, 1986James HeppAdjustable knockdown tray assembly
US5275289 *Aug 11, 1992Jan 4, 1994Pak-It Metal Display Corp.Frame container support and stackable container system using same
US5921513 *May 28, 1997Jul 13, 1999Skvorecz; RobertWire chafing stand
US5957309 *Aug 23, 1996Sep 28, 1999Hall; Donald M.Tray rack
US5996948 *Jan 12, 1998Dec 7, 1999Skvorecz; Robert J.Wire chafing stand
US6047932 *Apr 14, 1999Apr 11, 2000Skvorecz; RobertWire chafing stand
US6974042Jul 16, 2002Dec 13, 2005Hall Donald MNestable and/or liftable rack
US7419063May 3, 2004Sep 2, 2008M & E Manufacturing Company, Inc.Nestable and liftable oven rack
US7954772 *Apr 11, 2007Jun 7, 2011Robert SkvoreczWire chafing stand and method
US9414712Nov 7, 2014Aug 16, 2016Robert SkvoreczCompactly stackable wire chafing stand
US9517858Mar 23, 2015Dec 13, 2016Robert J SkvoreczCompactly stackable wire chafing stand
US9539677May 22, 2012Jan 10, 2017Robert John SkvoreczLow cost wire chafing stand and method
US20050205508 *Mar 17, 2004Sep 22, 2005Carter Jeffrey WSupplemental shelf for vehicle-mounted cleaning systems
US20080251657 *Apr 11, 2007Oct 16, 2008Robert SkvoreczWire chafing stand and method
US20090071924 *Sep 14, 2007Mar 19, 2009Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpMounting Bracket For Container Of Sheet Products
US20090258127 *Apr 15, 2008Oct 15, 2009Joshua HoltzContainer Rack of a Food Warmer and Method of Use
USRE42988 *Mar 15, 2001Dec 6, 2011Robert SkvoreczWire chafing stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/509, 211/126.9, 220/9.4, 211/133.5, 248/153
International ClassificationB65D21/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D21/0211
European ClassificationB65D21/02E2