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Publication numberUS2838210 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 10, 1958
Filing dateDec 21, 1954
Priority dateDec 21, 1954
Publication numberUS 2838210 A, US 2838210A, US-A-2838210, US2838210 A, US2838210A
InventorsDetrie Arthur J, Stayboldt Paul J
Original AssigneeDouglas Aircraft Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sealant dispensing device
US 2838210 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Julie 10, 1958 A, J. DETRl'E ET AL 2,838,210

SEALANT DISPENSING DEVICE Filed DeC. 2l, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 -AffaeA/ev June 10, 1958 A. J. DETRIE ET AL 2,838,210

SEALANT DISPENSING DEVICE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 21; 1954 June 10, 1958 A. J. DETRIE ET AL 2,838,210

' SEALANT DISPENSING DEVICE Filed Dec. 2l, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 W h 5 Am f f m? N im Q 5? m N\ 7 Q @J WM im W Mnl www N Q m Q k www Q um N w .l l mm mv @.QIN NN UILNIM 4 mw @gli Q 4/ uw QQ w June 10, 1958 i A. .1. DETRIE ET AL 2,838,210

SEALANT DISPENSING DEVICE Filed Deo. 2l, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 MEZA June 10, 1958 `A. J. DETRIE ETA-L 2,838,210

SEALANT DIsPENsING DEVICE Filed Dec. 21, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 United `States Patent SEALANT DISPENSING DEVICE Arthur J. Detrie, Santa Monica, and Paul J. Stayboldt,

Los Angeles, Calif., assignors to Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc., Santa Monica, Calif.

Application December 21, 1954, Serial No. 476,618

Claims. (Cl. 222-327) This invention relates to means for sealing structural jointures, as with a viscous, cold-setting sealant.

Usually, the actual applying of such sealants to such jointures is, among other things, a somewhat tedious and quite time-consuming manual operation. The sealant is removed, a little at a time from a container thereof by means of a spatula or the like and the removed portion is transferred on the spatula to the jointure.

Such methods are hardly compatible, in any degree of profit and efficiency, with the large-scale quantity production and sealing of the framed and plated pressurized structures, such as airplanes, with which this invention is concerned.

The types of sealants contemplated by this invention are quite viscous and remnants adhere to the nozzle and magazine of the ordinary dispenser, rendering it difficult to clean them, so that seldom are such dispensers entirely free of residual amounts of sealant. Residual sealant in any part of the system deteriorates and inevitably becomes mixed with and contaminates the next load of sealant, which contamination should be precluded by all means, for obvious reasons. y

For this reason, among others, disposable-cartridge guns, broadly so-called, have been proposed, the disposable cartridge carrying the sealant demountably in the gun. Invariably, such dispensers hitherto have invloved a multiplicity of parts, entailing far from infrequent malfunctionings, breakages and rather unreliable operation. The weights and bulks of some of these prior dispensers are not inconsiderable, oft-times necessitating the employment of both of the hands of the operator.

The present invention provides a mode and means of applying suitable sealants to jointures which consist of a dispenser-applicator of such a nature as to place most joint-sealing operations, regardless of the length of the jointure, in the category of profitable quantity-production manufacturing procedures.

To this and other ends, the invention provides an automatic sealant dispensing and applying, hand-held tool which can contain, feed out and apply sealant from a magazine substantially of any desired capacity at a high lineal-footage rate.

The tool, in one of its embodiments, assumes the conformation of an automatic pistol, thus to take advantage of the natural ease with which humans hold and point a pistol. By these means, the pistols nose can be accurately trained along a seam and held with the minimum of effort While applying the sealant.

Broadly considered, the article comprises a main frame, or handle, group carrying on the upper portion thereof a secondary frame or backing-socket `group into which the other two main components--a valving group for controlling the flow of pressure-fluid in dispensing the sealant and a barrel unit containing a supply of sealantare coaxially mounted. The valving group is mounted rearwardly of the sealant magazine, or barrel group, in such manner as to enable proper dispensing of the sealant under fluid pressure thru a nozzle of the barrel group.

l 2,838,210 Patented J une 1 0, 19H58 in the manner of a stylus.

Thus, among other things, the main element, the barrel group, avoids the usual angling thereof which entails manifold disadvantages, such as poor sealant 110W control and difficulty ofmanufacture. By the same token, the barrel is rendered free of handles, grips and the like which would, for one thing, render it dilcult to'disassemble the barrel from the rest of the article.

The article having the conformation of an automatic pistol with the major portion of the mass ofthe sealant, together with the heavy valving and socketing components, disposed rearwardly of the geometrical center of the handle, balance of the article in the hand holding it is thus automatically provided. 'K

By virtue of the conf'gurationrof the barrel with the socket that enables the barrel-unit to be removedvand replaced as a unit so that a fresh cartridge of sealantpmay be inserted, fouling of the gun is obviated with consequent elimination of the necessity for cleaning same.

Means being provided for preventing pressure `uidapplying operation of the valving When the barrelunit is improperly seated in the socket member, accidental discharging operation ofthe gun cannot occur with the barrel-unit only partially seated and unlocked. Consequently, there is no danger f1 om this source of the barrel unit or its contents being blown out of th gun by'the action of pressure-fluid thereon if the parts are not properly assembled and locked in place. Y

Pressure-fluid bleeder 'means are provided in the valving unit which are so arranged and associated with the valve members and with the barrel unit and' the valve casing that the full value of the fluid-pressure is not appl-ied to the sealant supply immediately upon opening the fluid-inlet valve. Instead, this pressure is gradually applied so that, rather than suddenly emitting a large, unconstrained and indeterminate mass or blob of sealant forcefully from the gun, a steady, controlled stream of sealant is slowly discharged up to the full pressure. The reverse action of -these bleeder4 means results in sudden release of the pressure on the sealant, sharply cutting oif ow thereof thru the nozzle and obviating the usual tapering-off iiow thereof, or drooling The sealant is forced out the nozzle from the cartridge by means including a free, floating piston mounted coaxially in the rear end of the cartridge, a novel sealing effect being obtained by forceful expansion of the rear wall portion of the piston against the wall of the container under the pressure of the fluid-power supply.Y

The cartridge configured with the gun is an inexpensive and discardable container composed of some such synthetic organic plastic as one of the polyethylenes. .The cartridge -is inert to all the common types of sealants, such as the thiokols, mastics, asphaltics and the like and is well adapted to withstand the detrimental effects of heated sealants up to temperatures of the order of F.

Many other advantages and novel aspects inhere in the invention and will either be set forth or become apparent hereinafter.

In order to render the inventive concepts further apparent, a typical embodiment of an article for performing the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings and describedhereinafter in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In these drawings,

Figure 1 is a perspective View of one ofthe present dispensers in use on an overhead, lap-jointed structure for the purpose of applying sealant to the jointure;

.Figure 2 is a longitudinal, substantially central, section of the dispenser, certain components being shown in elevation;

Figure 3 is a view of the dispenser, partly in side elevation and partly in longitudinal section;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary, expanded perspective view of the dispenser;

Figure 5 is a sectional view on line 5-5 of Figure 3;

Figure 6 is a sectional view on line 6-6 of Figure 3;

Figure 7 is an enlarged section, partly in elevation, on line 7-7 of Figure 4; p

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the dispenser as vused on underlying work without a handle as in limitedaccess locations, the pistol-type handle having first been removed to facilitate such manipulation, and

Figure 9 is a front end View of the nozzle and barrel unit, per se, emphasizingV the rotation-facilitating uting andthe discharge orifice on the nozzle.

The exemplificatory construction illustrated essentially comprises, as shown in Figure 4 most clearly, a pressurefluid actuated, materials dispenser having the general conformation of an automatic pistol and comprising a mainframe component 80, of the article, a secondary frame component 90, a barrel-unit or group 100 and a pressure fluid-controlling or valving, unit 110. The unit 110 is specifically configured, in this embodiment, to control the flow of compressed air, but the invention contemplates its modification, without departing from the scope of the present concepts, to a configuration for controlling the flow of liquids, such as hydraulic power-transmission tiuids.

The main frame unit 80, as best seen in Figures 2, 3 and 4 principally lcomprises a handle 12 and one of its functions is to carry and support the trigger, valve-actuating mechanism and at least Ia portion of the barrel-group, all as later described.

On the handle 12, finger grip formations 13 are provided and near the top of the handles front edge a trigger 14 is mounted by means of a pivot-rod 15 serving as a pivot for trigger rotation. An aperture 16 is provided to receive the retracted trigger. A looped, wire spring 17, anchored at each end to suitable anchorages, biases the trigger outwardly by means of the resiliency of the wire and its shape and engagement.

The main frame unit 80 also includes a hollow head, platform or support 18 formed integral with the upper end of the handle portion of the unit. Portion 18 extends rearwardly from the handle, and adapted to be disposed coaxially in the rearward portion of the hollow platform, there is a casing or housing 19. Housing 19 is attached to a receiver, or socket, group 20, provided for reasons later set forth. The united casing and housing constitute a secondary frame and this frame is detachably attached in the platform 18 by quick release fastener means 21, such as a Dzus fastener, as shown.

The socket, or receiver, portion of the secondary frame essentially consists, as shown in Figures 2, 3 and 4 most clearly, of a generally cylindrical, hollow elongate member, open at its front end Iand bounded at its top and bottom surfaces by sectionally arcuate arms, or bifurcations, 22 and 23. The latter are united rearwardly by a vertical plate or connector 24. Mounted to the underside of lower arm 23 of the receiver 20 is the substantially hollow housing or casing 19 aforementioned. This casing surrounds and encloses the rear end of the valve-operating means, later described. The casing includes an opening 26 extending through the one side thereof, the opposite side and all other sides being imperforate, for reason hereinafter explained.

Each of upper and lower arms 22 and 23 includes an elongate longitudinally extending bayonet joint formation 4 upper and lower portions of the valve-box and the barrelgroup, later explained in detail.

Held coaxially in the rear end of receiver 20 by means of these joints is, as shown in Figures 4 and 5, a valve box, 2S which contains valving means for controlling the flow of compressed air or other pressure-duid, into and out of the barrel unit to effect dispensing of the sealant. As seen in Figures 4 and 5, box 28 consists of a short, generally hollow cylindric metallic casting that includes a vertically substantially centrally located valve-casing 29. An air inlet means or path is provided by a substantially hollow inlet casing 30 which extends inwardly from the one side of the box first being directed radially and thcn obliquing diagonally upwardly `into intersection with the central valve casing. A laterally projecting nipple or the like 2S outwardly terminates the inlet casing 30, and the periphery of the valve-box bears a pair of diametrically opposed box-mounting protuberances or lugs 31 and 32, constituted by the heads of plug-screws 34 and 35 mounted in the bore 33 of the central valve casing.

The central casing, as best seen in Figures 5 and 7, includes a vertical bore 33 extending from end'to-end of this casing. The bore 33 is open at each of its opposite ends, the aforesaid dual nature mounting lugs and plugs 34 and 35 serving to close bore 33. An insertable and removable valve unit or core 36, which may Well include a Schrader or Dill valve insides 37, or any type adapted to be actuated by a sub-adjacent push-rod unit, 38, is disposed coaxially in the bore 33, these insides being engaged therewith by suitable matching-helical screw threads 39, respec tively, formed substantially medially of the length of the bore-wall and on the lower end of the Schrader or Dill type valve. The push-rod unit is positioned by the engage ment of the corners of its polygonal head 40 with the bore wall, as shown and by the engagement of its lower portion with the adjacent bore plug.

Unit 36 terminates downwardly as a stem 260 and, in the usual manner, there is an actuating fluid inlet 2M provided at the upper end of insert unit 36 and defined by separable mating surfaces, axially opened by upward thrusts on stem 200.

The valving is adapted to be fed constantly with pressure fluid through the port 41 defined by the intersection of the oblique and vertical hollow casings cast in the valve box.

Between the upper end of the push-rod unit 38 and the lower end of the valve stem 200 and disposed coaxially 'around the stem is a helically coiled loading spring 42 tending normally to maintain the push rod unit at the 'bottom of the bore 33.

The bore 33 is circular in cross-section whereas the head 40 of the push rod is polygonal in section, so that their coaxiality establishes clearance paths for the passage of pressure-iiuid in both vertical directions therethrough. An outlet port 44 for the passage of pressure fluid into the rear end of the barrel unit is formed in the lower portion of the front diametral wall or face of the valve box, and opening into the central valve casing above the top position of the closure member of the push-rod unit, as shown, and a vent, or bleed orifice 45 is formed in the rear wall of the central valve-casing at a point considerably lower than orifice 44 and slightly above the no load position of the closure on the push rod.

Lower down the length of the push-rod there is an annular flanged valve-head, or closure member, 46 which is adapted to eventually seat against a metallic or elastomeric seat 47 formed therefor on the annular junctionedge of the 'bleeder passage and the main valve bore 33. Tlhese means and this arrangement thereof assure, when the push rod is urged upwardly, `an initially maximum, but gradually decreasing, discharge of pressure fluid from the -bleed port 45 and an initially minimum, gradually increasing discharge of fiuid from the pressure port, 44.

Thus as detailed in the operational description of the gun, pressure-fluid cannot be applied suddenly and un`balancedly to thesealant in the barre'Lunit; thereby preclud` ing spurting of the sealant through the nozzle of the gun. Nonetheless, relatively sudden cut-olf of sealant discharge, obviating drooling, loccurring substantially instantly upon release of the trigger or sear is also provided by the novel configurations aforesaid,

The forward diametral face or wall of the valve-box unit 28 is annularly grooved around its peripheral edge and one wall of this groove is bevelled inwardly in such manner as to define an annular, forwardly projecting wedge, or cartridge-expander, 4S. The latter is adapted to engage with the flanged rim of the open rear end of the cartridge in the barrel-unit, as later detailed.

A-s delineated in Figures 4 and 5, a hollow stud or headed nipple 2S is threa-ded into the radial casing and projects outwardly from the valve box unit. On this nipple is rotatively mounted a conventional swivel-coup'ling member 49, the sleeve thereof How-communicating with the flow path in the nipple. The latter in turn cornmunicates with the bore in the aforementioned hollow radial and oblique casing so as to supply pressure fluid to the central valvecasing.

The hose 75 leads to connection 49 thru an aperture 202 in the bottom end-face of the handle of the gun and thence through the hollow interior of the handle to an elongate free-slip aperture 203 4in the one side-face of the handle as shown. There normally being a certain amount of slack in the hose, and the anchored end thereof being swivellable, manipulation of the gun in substantially any desired :direction in applying the sealant is achievable without danger of kinking or binding the hose.

lThe free end of hose 75 is provided with a standard quick-disconnect ainhose coupling 76. When it is clesi-red to use the gun without handle 12, the coupling 76 is disconnected from the supply line, hose 75 is slipped out of the handle through apertures 202 and 203, and the coupling is again connected, the swivel connection 25, 49 providing freedom of movement of the gun with respect to the hose.

A valve-operating lever, strip, or Sear-member 51, adapted to be actuated by the trigger, i-s, as best Aseen in Figures 2 and 4, provided and herein takes the form of an elongate metallic strip which is liat in its forward portion and concave upwardly in its rear portion. Lever 51 is disposed to extend longitudinally of the gun on the upper end-portion of the main frame and its rear end extends into housing or casing 19 (carried by the receiver group 20). lIts front end portion extends forwardly past the lower, protruding end of the push-rod and in oper4 ative adjacency thereto. Preferably, the front tip of the lever` lies considerably ahead of the front yend of the platform, `thus to enable manual actuation of the valving independently of the trigger. In fact, as shown in Figure 8 the trigger and handle are not always present, but in this case, the thumb, or, respectively, the index finger may be employed as shown to actuate the gun.

As shown ybest `in Figure 2, the valve-actuating lever 51 is movably mounted at its rear end in the casing 19 by means of respective pairs of longitudinally spaced formations on the upper free edge of the lever 51 and on the socket member 20 which are mutually pivotally engaged in adjacent pairs. These means are here shown as a pair of longitudinally spaced ears 52 on the lower face o-f the lower arm 23 of the socket or receiver member 20, and adapted to be respectively interengaged with corresponding ears 53 on the upper edge of the rear portion of the valve actuating lever 51. Thus, upon manipulating the trigger, eventuating in upward rotation of lever 51 about its longitudinal axis, this longitudinally restrained rear portion of lever S1 will rotate upwardly and counterclockwise about the longitudinal axis of its pivotal mounts, causing the upper free edge aforesaid to operatively engage the lower end of the push rod of the *6 valving-unit, provided the safety means, later described, have not been called into action by virtue of the barrellunits 'being mounted in improper unlocked condition in the receive-r or socket 20. IIn the latter event, these safety means positively prohibit movement of lever 51 and firing of the gun. Y

In order to prevent actuation of the valving and the tiring of the gun when the removable and replaceable sealant-containing barrel group is only partially positioned in the gun, that is, as shown in Figure 6, with the locking lugs not yet seated in their respective bayonetjoint slots because of incomplete rotation of the barrelunit about its longitudinal axis, safety means are provided on the rear end of the barrel-unit and on the adjacent portion of lever 51, that are adapted to interengage and prevent discharging operation of the gun under these circumstances. In one form, these means comprise a pair of radially projecting lugs 54 and 55 which are disposed at diametrically opposite points on the top and on the bottom, respectively, of the rear end of the metallic retainer of the barrel-unit, not only for engagement in the aforementioned bayonet-joint slots provided for this locking purpose, but to blockingly engage a lug or teat 58 formed on the free, upper edge of the rear portion of actuating lever 5l sub-adjacent the path of rotary movement of the bottom lug 55. Hence, in all mounted positions of the barred unit except that correct position in which lower lugfSS lies inwardly of the outer, freeedge of lever 51, the lug 58 will engage the lug 55 and immobilize the lever 51 despite all trigger pulls. Thus, the rotary upward movement of the lever 51 about its longitudinal axis is precluded and effective contact of any portion of lever 51 with the lower end of the valvings push rod is prevented. Discharging operation of the gun is hence now rendered impossible.

Hence, no fluid pressure can be applied to the contents of the barrel unit from the valving, so that when the barrel unit is loosely and improperly mounted in the gun, no sealant can be forced out of any opening anywhere in the gun and, what is more important, the barrel-unit cannot be blown out of the gun with consequent damage to the barrel, nozzle, sealant container and other parts of the gun. Further, referring again to Figure 5, it will be perceived that, while the trigger is depressed, effecting air-pressure application, the teat 58 is in raised, or detaining, position. Lying in the path of. outward movement of the lug 55, it now prevents the barrel unit from being turned and released so that torsions or twists applied by hand to the gun in its Figure 6 position cannot exert any consequential effect upon the integrity of the gun.

Constructionally, the barrel unit or group 100, itself, comprises, as best seen in Figure 2, a hollow, elongate, metallic and rigid cylindric container or retainer S7. It is noteworthy that this retainer is of entirely clean design, excepting the locking lugs, and, being composed of a low density, but circumferentially and longitudinally rigid and tough metallic alloy, is compact, light in weight and highly resistive to those hoop tensions which, at the present high air-pressures, of the order of 100# sq. in., quite often rupture and explode the barrel of contemporary analogous devices.

The cylindric retainer 57 is open at each of its opposite ends and is continuously rectilinear and of unvarying, unilateral direction from end to end, t-hus obviating any of the usual longitudinal angularities or changes in direction of such articles. It is devoid of integral handles, grips, knobs and the like excrescences and protuberances that would mar the clean lines of the gun and barrel and both these factors contribute materially to the almost universal adaptability of the ygun to all normal working environments, including locaor less hemi-spheroidal in contour in order to conform to the improved forward end of the sealant-cartridge contained in the hollow retainer. This rounded end includes a circular aperture 59 for receiving the front, or nozzle portion, of the sealant cartridge therethrough. The open rear end of the retainer 57 is circular in crosssection and the rim thereof is rigid and unbent, constituting a sealing component, as later detailed.

Disposed coaxially in the retainer 57 is a conforming, generally cylindric sealant-containing unit, 60. This unit constitutes a removable and replaceable cartridge adapted to contain the quantity of sealant necessary to finish most production sealing-projects without refilling. The container 6) is freely mounted in the retainer with its exterior surface in close contact with the interior surface of the retainer, and each of the opposite ends of container, or bottle, 60 is open to a greater or lesser degree. It is intended for member 66, notwithstanding the aforestated advantageous functionings thereof, to be so inexpensive as to be discardable after emptying, yet light, durable and rugged and substantially inert chemically, and thermally resistive and non-conductive. It is to be unaffected detrimentally by extremes of temperature from well below F. to well above 120 F. The member 6i) must also be non-hygroscopic and impervious so as to obviate the collecting of water, vapors or other extraneous substances on the exterior surface thereof and its penetration into and admixing with the contents. It is further contemplated that the member 60 be substantially chemically inert to all the common sealants, in cludiug that known as EC-SOl, and made by Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, Los Angeles, California, and also inert to all the common vehicular-solvents. It must be non-hardenable or further polymerizable and brittlizable at low temperatures and it must be flexible and self-conforming to enclosing shapes and heat moldable, and so tough as to be in infrangible and dimensionally recuperative, yet rigid and self-sustaining enough to withstand piston forces. Preferably, it is also L to be translucent enough to enable inspection therethrough of the quantity and condition of the contents and must be yeldable yet dimensionally recuperative enough tobe self-sealing and to conform to circumscribing shapes.

When configured as herein described these requirements have, by extensive research and tests, been found to be met by those synthetic organic thermoplastics which are either aliphatic hydrocarbons or a halogensubstituted aphiphatic hydrocarbon of the same general characteristics. Since this aliphatic hydrocarbon must be chemically inert to thiokol sealants, and to their vehicular solvents, accelerators and fillers, as well as to mastics, asphaltics and the homologous or analogous sealants, that group of such aliphatic hydrocarbons known as the polyethylenes are particularly well suited to the present purposes.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention, therefore, the member 60 is composed of a suitable polyethylene, although the invention also contemplates the use of polyesters, Teflon and the suitable polyvinyls.

The open rear, circular-section end of the unit 60 bears, on its outer periphery, an outwardly extending annular flange 62. The annular wedge 48 on the front face of the valve box expandingly engages this rear edge and urges it into sealing contact with the rear or rim of the retainer 57, the latter in turn being axially sealingly clamped against flange 62 by the set-.screw thrust thereon which screw is later described. This flange is sealingly clamped to the rear end of the stainless steel retainer or barrel by means of the front face of the wedge-forming groove in the valve box and this also constitutes a gasket integrated with the cartridge. Further, if desired, since the cartridge can be filled from the rear end as well as from the front end, this annular flange can serve, like the beading on the front end, as a detent for engagement in a gang-filling machine. Similarly to the beading at the front end, it also constitutes an annular base for bonding to a closure cap with a snap ring. If desired, the radial extent of the flange may be enlarged sufficiently to constitute it a base on which the cartridge may be stably rested when not in the gun.

In moulding the container, any excess polyethylene can be flowed rearwardly to and absorbed by this flange, thus also obviating thin edges which cool rapidly and become brittle.

The pressure fluid is applied concentratedly to the rear portion of the sealant in the container 60 by means of a free, or fioating, piston 6ft, best seen in Figure 2 and which is seated coaxially in the cylinder 60. The piston preferably takes the form of a cylinder open at the rear end and capped at the front end by a rounded head. Preferably, this head is hemispherical and has rather thick walls in order to resist collapse longitudinally under the forces exerted thereon along the nozzle when the nozzle is pressed downwardly against the work being sealed.

The floating, domed piston fits congruently into this hemispherical head-portion at the end of its stroke, thereby, among other things, completely evacuating the cartridge of sealant. The rim of the open rear end is feathered, or inwardly bevelled, to enable the air pressure to tightly seal the peripheral surface of the piston to the conforming cylindrical cartridge. Both the piston and the cartridge-Shell or removable liner for the barrel being preferably composed of polyethylene, they have the same coefficient of thermal expansion, so that no differential radial movements can occur between them, no gaps therefore developing between same and no sealant being able to penetrate between the piston and the cylinder, despite the fact that the usual design of the present dispenser employs air pressures of the order of p. s. i.

The domed forward end of the piston concentrates the air-pressure at the center of its face and therefore in alignment with the nozzle of the gun. The hollow interior of piston 64 cooperates with the air chamber 65 l0- cated rearwardly of the piston and the valving aforedescribed serves to prevent sudden application of pressure to the sealant also preventing drooling of the sealant out of the nozzle.

Axial positioning and clamping thrust of the valve box against the rear end of the barrel unit is provided by means of a set-screw unit 66 which reaches through a bossed aperture 67 in the rear wall 24 of the receiver group. The rear, diametrally complete face of the valve box includes a detent 68 in the form of a depression therein in which the inner end of the set screw engages. The outer end of unit 66 may be knobbed and knurled, as shown.

Setting up of the set screw axially forces the valve box into contact with the rear face of the bottle and retainer and not only establishes the aforementioned seal of the annular flange around the rear end of the shell, but in effect unilies the barrel unit and valve box for unitary support by the socket 20, thus stabilizing them almost rigidly in the gun.

The polyethylene cartridge, containing the sealant and the piston, is not entirely self-sustaining under all forces, being susceptible to radial distortion under sufficient high pressure. However, the retainer 57 is contemplated herein as being of such a shape, configuration and composition, although light and compact, as to support and confine these elements in proper shape. Preferably the retainer 57 is composed of some such light and rigid metal as a stainless steel or an aluminum alloy and takes the radial and other forces and transforms them into balanced hoop tensions, etc.

The cartridge 60 is provided, as seen in Figures 2 and 3, with a separate nozzle 71 which is configured to engage in an orifice 69 in the front end of the polyethylene bottle. Orifice 69 is frusto-conical in shape, tapering rear` wardly, and its Ainterior conic surface bears a three-turn pipe-thread 70, as contrasted to a standard helical thread on a cylindric surface. The nozzle 71, which may be composed of any suitable material, but preferably of an organic, synthetic thermoplastic, such as one of the Teflons or one of the aforementioned polyethylenes, has a rearwardly tapered, or hollow frusto-conical, rear end portion 72, and the outer surface of member 72 is provided with three turns of a matching pipe-thread 73. The nozzle bears fluting 74 at its rear end portion to facilitate secure gripping and easy rotary removal of the nozzle, which, being jam-screwed in place, would otherwise be quite difficult to remove with the bare fingers, since Teflon and other suitable materials have a surface of high lubricity. This fluting may be dened by the edges of a pair of coaxial pyramids rotated 45 relative to each other about their common axis.

Since these threads are cut in a polyethylene, which is a somewhat yieldable material, only two complete turns of the nozzle are required in order to effect disengagement. For, after the second turning or revolution, the nozzle may be pulled out axially from its engagement, the threads being axially flexible and yielding to allow this axial movement to this end.

Since the rear end of the nozzle, kincluding the threaded portion thereof, is tapered rearwardly as a part of a frusto-cone, the same being true of the wall-surface of the socket in the forward end of the bottle, the nozzle can be plugged into the threads in the orifice for about one-third of its length before the threads mutually interengage. Thereupon, about two complete turns of the nozzle reach the threads on each other.

It will be observed that the angle of rearward taper of the'inner end of the nozzle is greater, or more obtuse, than that of the socket in the bottle. That is, the unthreaded portion of the frusto-conical inner end of the nozzle has a greater diameter than the greatest diameter of the outer end of the orifice in the bottle. Thus, when the threads are reached, this pulls the wide, unthreaded portion of the inner end of the nozzle into the narrower outer end of the orifice in the same manner in which a cork is pushed into a bottle-mouth, thereby itself forming an adequate seal.

The invention contemplates that the entire nozzle may be made of metal, with a self-tapping feature consequent upon this fact and the fact that the threads on the nozzle be pipe-threads and not standard, cylindric-helical threads. When such a metal nozzle is jammed or plugged into the orifice and turned, it then taps its own threads into the wall of the orifice.

As demonstrated in Figures 1 and 8, the invention enables the employment of a sealant tool on jointures lying either overhead or below the worker and either difficult or easy of access. In most cases, the tool is manipulated in the form of a spray gun, with both the handle and the barrel present. For use as a stylus or in places difficult of access, the Dzus fastener 21 is manipulated and the barrel-and-valve unit are removed from the frame and are thereafter maintained as a unit by means of the receiver and the set screw, as shown in Figure 6. The elongate tubular article of Figure 6 can then be grasped in one hand and held either underhand with the fingers manipulating the tip of the lever 51 to operate the gun; or held overhand, in the manner of a pencil, between the thumb, index finger and middle finger. In either case, the nozzle can be accurately applied to and directed along the seam with the minimum of effort.

In any technique of employing the tool, upon operating the lever 51 and with the barrel unit properly locked in place, the pressure-fluid, herein envisioned as compressed air or its equivalent, already pressing into bore 33 from the air hose and connections aforesaid, is simultaneously released thru pressure port 44 and bleed port 45. Thus a differential amount of the air initiallyl enters vpressure port 44, because some airis also exiting thru bleed port 45. This differential is maintained until valve head or closure member 46 on the push rod seats tightly on its seat 47. Consequently, there is no possibility of the full value of the air pressures being applied directly and suddenly to the free piston in the sealant cartridge. No sudden spurting, or ejaculation of4 sealant in an unconstrained, indeterminate amount or'` shape, can hence occur. TheV work, the operator andi the environment are hence relieved of danger lof dis figurement or soilure. In lieu of this far from unusual; occurrence with conventional sealant guns, this device effectuates a graduated discharge up to maximum,. because of the novel infinitely variable outward action, of the pressure-differential throughrport 44. As a con-- sequence, the free piston is moved with accelerationl from a slow start, initially applying a rather low force: which is controlledly augmented to the maximum.

By means of the same partsv and configuratiom. tapered off termination of the discharge of sealant, orl drooling of the nozzle, is obviated. For, by virtue: of the aforedescribed conguration, upon release of the trigger or lever 51, sudden or rapid cut-off of the pressure on the sealant is achieved. The aforementioned biasing spring 77 on the lever 51 returns the lever to its inactive position upon release of the trigger and, by virtue of the bleed and its arrangement, instead ofthe air remaining trapped and expanding behind the free piston, and continuing to force the latter forwardly against the sealant or seeping forwardly around the edges of the piston, it will be entrained backwardly thru the pressure port 44, downwardly past the polygonal headfof the push rod, now well below port 44 and dissipate to the lower pressure circumambient atmosphere thru the bleed port 45. This action occurs rapidly because of the pressure differential between the bore 33 and the atmosphere. However, there is little likelihood of the venting high pressure air impinging upon the sealant, upon dust, orupon the operator, for this vent is rearwardly directed.

It is worthy of note that the gun is readily adapted to apply the sealant in corners and other places diflicult of access, for the thermoplastic polyethylene nozzle can be heated in situ and easily bent to the desired curvature. It can also be easily cut off on a bias to provide angled discharge orifices of different diameters, which latter, moreover, can be heated and shaped to any desired crosssectional contour.

If desired, the forward end of the bottle 60, around the orifice therein, may be provided with an integral annular flange serving, among other things, to facilitate attachment of the bottles orifice to a gang sealantfilling machine when the bottles are outside the retainer 57. This beading also servesto Vstilfen the neck in which the nozzle seats as well as constituting an annular base to which a cap or other closure may be thermoplastically bonded. In the latter case, this closure cooperates with the similar closure bonded to the annular flange or base at the opposite end of the cylindric body in order to define a closed container. Th'ese two caps, or either of them, however, can be readily removed by means of a cutter-tool, which can be run annularly around the edge and portion of the closure to sever it from the annular fiange.

The hitherto onerous task of cleaning residual sealant from the gun is entirely obviated by means of the present invention. For, by merely removing the easily detachable uted nozzle in the manner described, the empty cartridge shell or barrel liner 60 can be slid rearwardly out of the retainer or barrel 57, leaving no residue. In its place, a fresh, clean filled cartridge can be readily inserted. Because of the simple yet rugged design of the cartridge, it can be made of a cheap but strong plastic material at such a very low cost per unit that each empty unit can be discarded after a single use.

Since the time and labor costs of cleaning and refillingA 11 a conventional such gun are far from negligible, this feature of the invention is of more than a little significance in this art.

The container 60 can be readily sealed as aforementioned at each end to convert it into a bottle or storage unit for sealants, so that an operator may have a supply of filled cartridges on hand at all times, obviating the necessity for taking time out to fill a cartridge. The stored, filled cartridges may well be gang-filled at a central station by a gang filling machine, employing the beading at the forward end.

It can be readily seen by an inspection of Figures 2 and 3 that all major components of the gun are closely grouped around a design center, which lies very'near the center of gravity of the article. This center of gravity, further, lies near the geometrical center of the handle, thereby conferring balance of the gun in the hand of the holder and thus enabling accurate pointing of the nozzle along the seam to be sealed while minimizing hand fatigue incident to necessarily tightly grasping imbalanced applicator-tools for long periods of time.

It is contemplated that the removable liner-unit o1 cartridge-shell 60, etc., can be made and sold as a general type of container for contents other than sealants, adhesives and the like, being well adapted as an article of general commerce containing a liquid, a semi-solid or other pressurally owable material such as synthetic frosting and whipped cream for bakeries; electrical potting compounds, caulking materials and similar pressurally owable materials.

To these ends, the cylindric member, minus the applicator, can be temporarily sealed at cach of its ends by either a disc bonded thereto or snap-ring fastened thereto and in either case readily removable by means of a knife or the like. Although plastic, such filled containers, or packages, can withstand storage for a long time without deterioration, for one reason, because of the inertness, imperviousness, insolubility and heatresistivity of the wrapper, or polyethlene wall and bottom.

With no such end-caps or closures present and with the nozzle in p lace and the movable bottom accessible to pressural, axially directed forces for extruding the contents thru the nozzle, the removable barrel-liner or cartridge shell is salable as a dispensing container for paste-like, or semi-solid contents.

Although certain of the elements of construction constituting the presently preferred embodiment of the inventive concepts have been specifically described with reference to their shapes, proportions and geometry, it is to be understood that such particularization in no wise constitutes the invention itself or limits the scope of the concepts. The ambit of the invention itself is defined in the sub-joined claims.

Wc claim:

l. A dispenser, comprising: a main frame; a socket mounted atop the rearmost end of said main frame and constituting a secondary frame; a cartridge-unit, containing dispensable material, for mounting coaxially in said socket, said socket being closed at its rear end and open at its front end for coaxially and removably receiving the rear end of sm'd cartridge unit in said front end and to enable the rear end of said socket to effectuate sealing of said cartridge unit, said cartridge unit being open at a pair of opposed, front and rear, loci thereof; powering-fluid receiving and valvular powering-Huid directing means mounted in said socket coaxially of, and rearwardly adjacent, the rear one of said pair of loci; said flowdirecting means being in communication with the open rear of the cartridge unit at said rear locus; and means for controlling the said means, said controling means being operatively connected on occasion to said flowdirccting means, so as to effectuate controlled dispensing of said dispensable material thru the front one of said loci.

2. A dispenser, comprising: a main frame, a singlepiece complete socket mounted atop thc renrmost end of said main frame and constituting a secondary frame; a cartridge-unit containing dispcnsable` material for mounting coaxially in said socket, said socket being closed at its rear end and open at its front end for removably receiving the rear end of said cartridge unit conxially in Vsaid front end and to enable the rear end of said cartridge unit coaxially in said front end and to enable the rear end of said socket to effectuate sealing of said cartridge unit, said cartridge-unit being open at a pair of opposed, front and rear, loci thereof, power-fluid receiving and flow valving and directing means mounted substantially coaxially with and rearwardly of said cartridge unit; said flow-directing means being in flow-communication with the open rear end of said cartridge unit; and means operatively associated with said flow-directing means for effecting occasional operation thereof and dispensing of said dispensable material thru said open front end.

3. A dispenser, comprising: a main frame; a forwardly facing socket mounted atop the rearmost end of said main frame and constituting a secondary frame, said socket being closed at its rear end and open at its front end; a hollow, elongate rigid first member open at its opposite ends and disposed coaxially in the open front end of the socket; a second member slightly lesser in diameter and length than the first member, said second member being composed of a non-rigid or collapsible plastic material so incapable of being self-sustaining as to require external encompassing support and open at its opposite ends, said second member being mounted coaxially in said first member so as to enable the rigid first member to receive hoop tensions from the second member and stabilize` same, said second member being adapted to contain a dipensablc sealant; valve means mounted nt the rearmost ends of the first and second members and communicating with the rear openings therein for channelling powering-huid into the rear end of said seco-nd member; and control means connected to said valve means and operable to cause said valve means to dispense said sealant through the openings in the front ends of the first and second member.

4. A Huid-actuated dispenser, comprising: a main frame; a socket-member mounted atop same; reservoir means mounted coaxially in said socket and adapted to contain a dispensable material and having open front and rear ends; powering-fluid receiving and directing means mounted coaxially rearwardly of the open rear end. of said reservoir means and Flow-communicable therewith; means in said receiving means operable to admit powering fluid thereinto; differentially and sequentially directing valving means located onwardly in said receiving means, said valving means being operable so as to initially pass onwardly from said receiving means to the open rear end of said reservoir, only a minor portion of the fluid admitted to the receiving means and venting to atmosphere the major portion of said received fluid, thereby to relieve said end of said reservoir and the material therein of sudden impulses of powerfluid, said means located onwardly in said receiving means being constructed and arranged to subsequently and graduatedly admit the major portion of the fluid to saidV open rear end so as to exert the full fluid-pressure head on the material therein; and means for controlling said differential valving means on occasion; whereby to obviate sudden, uncontrolled emission, or sporting of said material from said open front end when said controlmeans are actuated.

5. A fluid-actuated dispenser, comprising: reservoir means adapted to contain a dispensuble material, the reservoir having open front and rear ends; pressure-fluid receiving and directing means mounted coaxially rearwardly of the open rear end of said reservoir means; said receiving means including a pressure port communicabing with said rear end of said reservoir and a bleed port communicating with the atmosphere; means in said receiving means constructed and operable to admit pressure uid into said receiving means; controllable differential valving means disposed in said receiving means onwardly of said admitting means and shaped land arranged to operate so as to pass backwardly through said pressure port from the rear end of said reservoir, and thence thru said bleed port to the atmosphere, the residual portion of the pressure fluid admitted to said valving means from the receiving means; the means associated with said valving means for directing said backwardly passed residual iluid towards the atmosphere, thereby relieving the material remaining in the reservoir from cut-off lag due to the residual pressure of said pressure Huid after the valve-opening means are de-actuated; and means for actuating said valving means; whereby to effect substantially instantaneous cut-off of sealant discharge from the dispenser upon de-actuation of said actuating means thereby to prevent drooling discharge from said dispenser.

6. A dispenser, comprising: a substantially hollow, elongate barrel open at its front end and in effect closed at its rear end; detentive means disposed at peripherallyspaced points on the periphery of said barrel and adapted to be detained by complementary .detent means in the dispenser; a member including complementary detent means for detaining the first said detent means; reservoir means for dispensable material disposed coaxially in said barrel and having open front and rear ends registering with the corresponding ends of the barrel; controllable pressure-fluid receiving and directing means arranged coaxially rearwardly of said reservoir means, said directing means controllably flow-communicating with the open rear end of the reservoir; means peripherally spaced on the rear end of saiddirecting means for dsengageably engaging in said detaining member; and means lying adjacent the forward portion of the unit for controlling said flow-communication.

7. A dispenser, comprising: a substantially hollow, elongate barrel open at its front end and in effect closed at its rear end; detentive means disposed at peripherallyspaced points on the periphery of said barrel and adapted to be :detained by complementary detent means in the dispenser; a member including complementary detent means for detaining the first said detent means; reservoir means for dispensable material disposed `co-axially in said barrel and having open front and rear ends registering with the corresponding ends of thel barrel; controllable pressure-fluid receiving and directing means arranged coaxially rearwardly` of said reservoir means, said directing means controllably flow-communicating with the open rear end of the reservoir; means peripherally spaced on the rear end of said directing means for disengageably engaging in said detaining member; means lying adjacent the forward portion of the unit for controlling said ow-communication; and axial thrust exerting means mounted coaxially on said detaining member at its rear end and arranged and adapted to direct a thrust forwardly against the means detained by said detaining member so as to compact same together and stabilize and rigidify same unitarily thereby to facilitate manipulation of the article.

8. Safety means for preventing inopportune actuation of a pressure-fluid actuated material dispenser of the kind that includes a material reservoir and means operatively organized therewith for applying pressure-fluid to the material therein, comprising: socket means constructed for coaxially receiving the reservoir; means in said socket and on the reservoir for releasably detaining the reservoir therein; controllable pressure-fluid receiving and directing means disposed coaxially rearwardly y*of said reservoir means and flow-communicable therewith; actuator means for actuating said controllable directing means; and means arranged on said actuator 114 means so as to obstruct the' detentive means on said reservoir when the latter means is therein in vother than its properly detained position thereby to then prevent' discharging operation of said dispenser.

9. Safety means for preventing dispensing from a pressure-fluid actuated dispenser that includes reservoir means coaxially lockable in a socket member axially adjacent a pressure-fluid flow controller ow communicating therewith upon actuation of an actuator for the controller, comprising: locking means on the reservoir means adapted to assume a locking position in the socket member to resist fluid-pressure thrust on the reservoir means from the flow-controller; and detent means on said actuator adapted to engage said locking means in positions other than the proper locking position of said locking means so as to prevent operation of the actuator.

-10. A magazine unit for a pressure-fluid actuated dispenser, comprising: reservoir means for containing a dispensable material, said means having coaxial, open front and rear ends; and a free, floating unidirectionally displaceable piston means mounted coaxially in said reservoir means rearwardly of the dispensable material therein, said piston means being hollow and open at its rear portion, the front wall of said piston means being forwardly convex, the convex front face of said wall being urged penetratively forwardly against said material by the piston-displacing forces so as to exert its dispensing force first along a line in alignment with the opening in the front end of said reservoir means.

11. A dispenser, comprising: a main frame; a socket open at itsfront end and closed at its rear end and m-ounted coaxially in said main frame in the rearward portion thereof; means mounted by its rear end coaxially in said socket for dispensably containing a material to be applied; valvular pressurefluid flow controlling and directing means mounted in said socket means rearwardly adjacent the rear end of said containing means and coaxially thereof inside said socket at the rearward end of the dispenser; means operatively connected to said flowcontrolling means for supplying pressure-fluid thereto; actuator means extending into operative juxtaposition with said flow-controlling means; and means flexibly mounted at the forward portion of said containing means for enabling constrained localized application of said material.

12. A dispenser, comprising: a frame having a top and a bottom; reservoir means demountably mounted atop the frame for containing a owable material, said means including a pair of oppositely disposed open ends; pressure-fluid receiving and flow controlling means mounted rearwardly coaxially adjacent said reservoir means and adapted to effect application of pressure to said material; and actuator means for actuating said flow-controlling means; said reservoir means and said flow-controlling means having their -combined center of gravity lying adjacent the geometrical center of said frame, whereby to balance the dispenser and enable the dispenser to be handheld in balance therein.

13. A dispenser, comprising: an elongate supporting frame having an upper portion and a lower portion; receiver-means demountably mounted atop said upper portion, Vsaid means having an open rear end for receiving a cartridge of owably-dispensable material and having an open front-end for dispensing the material; a cartridge of flowably-dispensable material mounted coaxially in said receiver-means, said cartridge having a front and a rear end and being open at each of said ends; axially reciprocatable means mounted coaxially in the rear end-portion of said cartridge; pressure fluid receiving and directing means mounted rearwardly adjacent said open rear end and flow-communicating with.

said reciprocatable means so as to controlledly apply duid-pressure thereto; and actuator means for operating said flow-controlling means to effect dispensing of said material thru said open front end.

14. A dispenser, comprising: an elongate supporting frame having an upper portion and a lower portion; receiver-means demountably mounted atop said upper portion, said means having an open rear end for receiving a cartridge of owably-dispensable material and having an open front-end for dispensing the material; a cartridge of flowably-dispensable material disposed coaxially in said receiver-means, said cartridge having a front and a rear end and being open at each of said ends; axially reciprocatable means mounted coaxially in the rear end-portion of said cartridge; pressure fluid receiving and directing means mounted rearwardly adjacent said open rear end and flow-communicating with said reciprocatable means so as to controlledly apply fluidpressure thereto; means in said pressure fluid receiving and controlling means for venting the accumulative pressure fluid from adjacency to said closure in the opposite end of said cartridge thru said receiving and controlling means to circumambient atmosphere; and actuator means for operating said flow-controlling means.

l5. In a device of the nature described including a frame having an upper, and a lower, end, an elongate, substantially hollow member for containing a dispensable material, said member having force-receiving means at the one end and material egress means at the opposite end, cylindric, pressure-fluid receiving and directing means mounted coaxially of, and rearwardly adjacent, the forcereceiving end of said hollow member so as to constitute a geometrical continuation of said hollow member; actuator-means for said fluid-directing means disposed generally at the same end of said containing-member as said force-receiving means, and said member extending continuously, from end to end thereof, in one and the same rectilinear direction and being substantially free of surface irregularities and adjunc-ts and cooperative detent means atop said frame, and on said hollow member, respectively, said means disengageably mutually engaging to removably secure said hollow member in place, whereby to enable its demountable mounting atop said frame and to enable its demounting therefrom for use as a pencil-like dispenser of said material.

16. A dispenser for dispensing, without refilling, a volume of material which is disproportionately large referred to the overall bulk of the dispenser, comprising: an elongate hollow member for containing a predetermined amount of pressurally-flowable material; outlet means for said material at the front end of said member; and cylindric pressure-iluid-receiving and directing means mounted coaxially of, and rearwardly adjacent, the rear end of said hollow member and forming a geometric continuation thereof; said receiving and directing means lying so closely axially adjacent the rear end of said elongate hollow member as to in effect constitute them unitary; and means exerting a thrust axially of said containing member and control means to rigidly and stably maintain same substantially unitary; said controlling means being adapted to be manipulated to control the passage of power-huid to and from said rear end; whereby to render the dispenser disproportionately roomy for its overall bulk and to render same so compact as to enable its facile use iu locations ordinarily difficult of access.

17. A container, comprising: an elongate, substantially hollow body open at its opposite ends; an axially movable bottom wall coaxially mounted in the one end of the body for axial pressure movement toward the opposite cud of the body so as to extrude the contents thereof out said opposite end; said one end of said body having an integral continuation thereof extending annular-ly therearound, said continuation having a rigidity suicient to reinforce said open end against radial forces yet having compressibility adequate to constituteit a gasket for sealing said one end to abutting-surface means.

18, A container, comprising: an elongate, substantially hollow body having a forward wall-portion adapted to receive a contents-dispensing nozzle; an elongate hollow nozzle mounted coaxially in said forward wall-portion and adapted to be forcefully pressed laterally against a work-piece; the remainder of the forward wall being plastic and collapsible and constituting the remainder of a hemisphere so as to constitute said wall a forwardly convex portion of said body, the hemisphericity of said forwardly convex plastic portion being adequate to resist collapse of the body under the reaction of said lateral pressure of said nozzle against the work-piece.

19. A container, comprising: an elongate, substantially hollow body of yieldable-elastic material having a forward wall portion apertured to receive an elongate nozzle; said aperture having a rearwardly tapered, frustoconical surface bearing tapered pipe-threads; the rearward end portion of said nozzle bearing a rearwardly tapered, frusto-conical surface, said latter surface bearing tapered pipe-threads matching the aforesaid threads whereby the nozzle may be axially plugged partially into said aperture to engage the threads therein and seated by rotation thereafter and whereby the nozzle may be removed by axial pull after disengagement of the interengaging inner most turns of said threads; thereby to expedite and facilitate the seating and removal of said nozzle.

20. A container, comprising: an elongate, substantially hollow body of .yieldable-plastic material having a forward wall-portion apertured to receive an elongate nozzle, the surface of said aperture being rearwardly, frusto-conically tapered at a predetermined included angle and bearing tapered pipe-threads at its inner end; the rearward end portion of said nozzle being rearwardly tapered frusto-conically at an included angle greater than that of the first-said included angle, said end portion of said nozzle bearing tapered pipe-threads matching those aforesaid whereby the reaching of the threads of the nozzle in those of the aperture effects fluid-tight seating of the threadless portion of said inner end of said nozzle in the threadless portion of said aperture.

21. A magazine unit for a pressure fluid actuated dispenser, comprising: reservoir means for containing a dispensable material, said reservoir means having a constricted opening arranged at its forward end along its longitudinal center line; and a free plastic forwardly displaceable piston mounted coaxially in said reservoir means rearwardly of the dispensable material therein, the front wall of said piston being forwardly convex, the convexity of said front wall being arranged to neutralize the reaction on said plastic piston of said dispensable material so as to prevent rearward collapse of the piston while facilitating penetration of said dispensable material by said piston.

22. In a dispenser of the class described: a hollow, open-ended container adapted to receive uid pressure at one end, and an axially movable closure for said one end of said container, said closure comprising a hollow cylinder domed at its forward end and open at its rear end, the rim of said open rear end being inwardly bevclled or feathered so as to enable the fluid pressure applied into said open end to force said rim radially outwardly against said container, thereby to seal the longitudinal surface of said closure to the adjacent surface of said container.

23. A container, comprising: a rst elongate, substantially hollow rigid body open at its opposite ends; a second, similar open-ended body, composed of a plastically deformable material less rigid than the first body, the second body being mounted coaxially in the first body; an axially movable bottom wall coaxially mounted in the one end of the second body, said one end of the second body having an annular, compressible flange extending peripherally thereof and integral therewith, said flange having a face abutting the adjacent end of the first body; a rigid pressure-Huid flow controlling and directing unit mounted coaxially of the rst body rearwardly adjacent the opposite face of said ange; and means exerting axial pressure on said controlling and directing unit so as to clamp said flange sealingly against said rst body and said unit.

24. In a dispenser of the nature described: a first substantially hollow and rigid body open at its opposite ends; a second, similarly shaped open-ended hollow body, less rigid than the first body, mounted coaxially in the rst body, said second body being adapted to contain a dispensable material and including a nozzle-attachment hollow prolongation extending coaxially thru the forward opening in the first body and beyond the foremost portion of said rst body; means for exerting dispensing pressure on said dis-pensable material; and a dispensing nozzle mounted coaxially in said prolongation and engaged therewith beyond said foremost portion.

25. A duid-actuated dispenser, comprising: reservoir means adapted to contain a ilowable material to be dispensed, said reservoir means having open forward and rearward ends; power-fluid receiving and now-directing means mounted coaxially rearwardly adjacent the open rear end of said reservoir means, said receiving and controlling means being in How-communication with said rear end; actuator-means extending alongside the generally rearward end of said reservoir means and operatively associated with said receiving and controlling means for effecting operation thereof, said actuator means being independently and directly manually operable; a handle for the dispenser extending angularly from sai-d reservoir means and operatively connected thereto; and triggermeans for effecting indirect operation of said actuator means, said trigger-means being carried by said handle operatively adjacent said actuator means.

26. A dispenser, comprising: open-ended reservoir means for containing a owably dispensable material; power-huid receiving and directing means mounted coaxially of said reservoir means rearwardly adjacent the open rear end of said reservoir means, said receiving and directing means being in flow-communication with said open rear end; a handle for the dispenser extending angularly from the lower side of said reservoir means, said handle being detachably attached to said reservoir means and including a rst aperture in the bottom of its lower end portion and including a second aperture in the upper end portion of one face of the handle; and a power-fluid supplying flexible conduit passing successively and loosely thru the rst and second apertures and into communicating connection with said receiving and directing means so as to effect shielding of said conduit with the handle in place while enabling removal of the handle with the conduit intact and to enable removal of the conduit with the handle intact.

27. A container, comprising: a hollow, unitary body having a front end-portion, a rear end-portion and a portion intermediate the aforesaid two portions and joining same, said portions being organized and constructed to directly and fluid-tightly contain and dispense a dispensable material; the rear end-portion of said body including a forwardly domed, substantially flexible surface extending transversely of said portion and closing same substantially duid-tightly, said surface being free of back-up means and being rigid enough to independently apply forward axial displacement to Vthe body contents under forward axial thrust on said forwardly domed surface exerted by other than rigid, force-applicators or forcetransmitters; and elongate, hollow applicator means coaxially carried by, and unitary with, said body at its for- 18 ward end, whereby the container is also adapted for use as a low-pressure independent dispenser.

28. A container, comprising: a hollow body having a front end-portion, a rear end portion and a portion joining the aforesaid portions, said portions being organized and constructed to directly and fluid-tightly contain and dispense a dispensable material, the rear end-portion of said body including a free, or 11oating, closure-andpiston, same having a forwardly convex front surface and being rigid and self-contained and domed enough to adapt it to independently apply forward axial displacement to the body contents under forward axial thrust thereon exerted by other than rigid back-up means applied thereto; andelongate hollow, applicator means coaxially unitarily carried by the front end portion of said body; whereby the container is adapted for use as a selfsufficient low-pressure, independent dispenser.

29. In a dispenser of the nature described:l a substantially rigid open-ended barrel,having a forwardly con. Vex front-end; and an open-ended container for dispensable material disposed coaxially in said barrel; said container being composed of a material which is axially elongatable under axially-directed forces, said container having a forwardly convex front end adapted to substantially congruently tit the inner face of the forwardly convex end of the barrel and said container having an annular, outwardly extending ange around its open rear end, said flange bearing against the periphery of the open rear end of said barrel and adapted to be clamped thereto; whereby when dispensing force is applied to said contents and same exerts longitudinal tension upon said elongatable container, the latter will be prevented from elongating.

30. In a dispenser of the nature described: a first,.

substantially rigid hollow body open at its opposite ends; a second such body, composed of less rigid material and adapted to dispensably contain a dispensable material, and open at its forward end, at least; said second body being disposed coaxially in the iirst body substantially congruently therewith; a hollow prolongation of the periphery of the opening in said forward end of said second body extending forwardly beyond the confines of the rst body thru the forward opening in the first body; means on the inner face of said prolongation for disengageably engaging a nozzle at a locus beyond the foremost portion of said first body; and means for exerting dispensing pressure on the contents of said second body; whereby to prevent soilure of said first body by the dispensing of said dispensable material, thereby to obviate the necessity for cleaning or discarding said first body.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,259,474 Barr Mal'. 19, 1918 1,633,357 Albertine June 2l, 1927 1,709,445 Tomes Apr. 16, 1929 1,751,128 Cocks Mar. 18, 193() 1,812,643 Albertine June 30, 1931 2,111,582 Crewe Mar. 22, 1938 2,175,522 Ginter Oct. 10, 1939 2,198,564 Robison Apr. 23, 1940 2,206,985 Vogt July 9, 1940 2,373,774 Murnane Apr. 17, 1945 2,512,178 Sherbondy June 20, 1950 2,615,598 Watkins et al Oct. 28, 1952 2,649,999 Burch Aug. 25, 1953 2,692,706 Wiksten Oct. 26, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF lCORRECTION l Patent No. 2,888,210 June 1o, 1958 Arthur J Detrie et al`l It is herebjr certified that error appears in the-printed specification of the above 4numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 2, line 58, strike out "as the thiokols, mastics,

asphaltcs and the like and is"1":and insert instead as the mastics, asphaltics, polysulfide polymer sealants, and the like and is e Signed and sealed this 31st day of January 1961.

(SEAL) 1- Attest:

KARL H., AXLINE ROBERT C. WATSON Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2943768 *May 27, 1958Jul 5, 1960Lindsay Myles WAir operated sealant dispenser
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US3144966 *Apr 16, 1962Aug 18, 1964Semco Res IncCartridge for mixing and dispensing sealant compound
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/327, 222/473, 222/389
International ClassificationB05C17/005, B05C17/015
Cooperative ClassificationB05C17/015
European ClassificationB05C17/015