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Publication numberUS2838759 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 17, 1958
Filing dateMay 10, 1956
Priority dateMay 10, 1956
Publication numberUS 2838759 A, US 2838759A, US-A-2838759, US2838759 A, US2838759A
InventorsDonald Tassie John William
Original AssigneeAdvance Glove Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glove
US 2838759 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 17, 1958 J. w, D, TAsslE 2,838,759

GLOVE Filed May 10, 1956 E@ Cyr/W A from/vir;

United States patent O 2,838,759 GLovE John William Donald Tassie, Somerset, Ky., assignor to Advance Glove Manufacturing Co., Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application May 10, 1956, Serial No. 584,105

3 Claims. (Cl. 2-167) This invention relates to an improved glove.

More particularly the invention relates to an improved plastic and/ or plastic-coated glove. Plastic and/ or plastic-coated gloves are common and well known. Such are usually hot and uncomfortable forthe wearer. Passage of air through the glove material is prevented by the plastic which is relatively moisture resistant and relatively impervious. If the glove fits closely about the hand and fingers of the wearer, there is little fiow of air thereabout to cool the hand.

An object of this invention is to provide a plastic-coated glove particularly designed as a work glove which glove is so formed that the plastic coating holds the woven or other glove forming material distended so that the hand portion and linger portions of the glove are held at all times open and free, and so that there is air circulation permitted about the hand and fingers of a wearer of the glove.

A further object is the provision of a plastic-coated glove which is so formed that the fingers thereof are held open and distended and shaped to a generally rectangular shape in cross section, such generally rectangular cross sectional shape extending throughout the length of the fingers. As a result of this cross sectional shape, there is an open space within each linger of the glove and extending throughout the length thereof particularly about the sides and back of the fingers of the wearer. Such open space provides ventilation for the fingers of the wearer because the glove fingers do not fit snugly about the wearers fingers along the sides and along the back thereof. Such glove ngers do fit sufficiently closely against the work faces of the fingers of the wearer to permit a glove to eiciently serve its intended purpose. There is normally a tendency for conventional plasticcoated gloves to collapse particularly toward the ends of the fingers and to generally follow the contour of the fingers so that when such a glove is put upon the hand Y of a wearer, it tends to hug the fingers of the wearer particularly toward the ends thereof. The glove of this invention is so constructed, formed and coated that the plastic coat maintains the sides of the fingers roughly perpendicular with respect to the working face thereof and "ice 2 line as Fig. 2 but through the glove prior to its being coated with plastic; Fig. 5 is a cross sectional View taken on the same line as Fig. 3 but through the glove prior to its being coated with plastic; and

Fig.v6 is a cross sectional view taken on the same line as Fig. 2 through the glove with the form in place within the glove and upon which the glove is coated and cured; and,

Fig. 7 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of Fig. 1.

Work gloves in association with which the instant invention may be employed are commonly formed of sheet fabric which is coated with plastic. Normally this is a woven canvas such as is well known. Such canvas is normally porous to the extent that air passes freely therethrough for ventilation. When such gloves are coated with the plastics commonly used for coating cloth, such as in raincoat or glove practices, the coating renders the material substantially impervious to the passage of air. At least it is sufficiently impervious to prevent the free fiow of air therethrough for normal ventilation and cooling of the hands of the wearer of the glove.

The instant glove is so shaped and formed that the fingers are maintained normally at a cross sectional shape which is not only sufficiently oversize the fingers of the intended wearer of the glove but possesses such shape that ventilation about the sides and backs of the wearers fingers is facilitated. ln Fig. l such a glove is illustrated as provided with the usual finger and thumb openings and the material of which the glove is formed may be canvas, such as indicated by the numeral 10 in Fig. 3. Such glove foundation is coated exteriorly with a suitable plastic coating indicated by the numeral 12. Such coating is so applied as to form a complete coat over that portion of the glove, all of it or such parts of it as are desired to be coated, and the coating is of sufficient thicki ness, strength and rigidity to serve its intended purpose.

maintains the back portions of the fingers free and spaced above the Working portions by the roughly perpendicular sides even to the ends of the fingers. lts shape therefore provides a roomy air space right up to the ends of the fingers of the glove along both sides and the back thereof.

Other objects, advantages, and meritorious features will more fully appear from the following description, claims, and accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a perspective of a glove embodying the invention of this application;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary cross sectional View taken on the line 2 2 of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 3--3 of Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view taken on the same In the fabrication of the glove of this invention, such glove is formed of suitable glove-forming material. The foundation of this glove-forming material may be canvas. Such canvas glove is cut sufficiently large so that when the glove is placed upon the hand there is sufficient material to provide a free air spaceV around Veach finger of the wearer and within thenger of the glove. A glove so formed is placed upon a form. A finger portion of a form is indicated by the numeral 14 in Fig. 6. This form has finger portions larger than the fingers of the intended wearer of the glove and so shaped in cross section as to impart the desired shape to the glove fingers. Such fingers of the form are preferably square or rectangular in cross section. They are so shaped that the distended or expanded shape given by the fingers of the form to the fingers of the finished glove cause the `fingers of the glove when received upon the fingers of the hand of a wearer to provide a free space within the fingers of the glove about the fingers of the wearer.

In the shape shown, the sides of the fingers of the glove extend substantially perpendicularly with respect to the face portions thereof. The back portions of the fingers of the glove are therefore supported free and clear above the back portions of the fmgers of the wearer. A clear space would therefore be provided around sides and back of the fingers of the wearer within the finger portions of the glove. Furthermore it will be noted that the ends of the fingers of the glove are squared off but slope rearwardly slightly from the working face toward the back. This provides an edge formation at the ends of the working faces of the fingers which facilitates the picking up of small articles by the wearer of such gloves.

A canvas glove so formed is placed upon a form such as 14 and may then be dipped in a suitable plastic dis- Vas a coating on a work glove.

persion or solution. Polyvinyl chloride or suitable plastisol dispersione have been found satisfactory. Organasol dispersions might also be used. Various suitable polyvinyl chloride or other synthetic thermoplastic resins are upon the market and have been used in the coating of materials to render them liquid-resistant and might be here used. Latex or neoprene might be used. Such plastic coating is moisture resistant and also resistant to many liquids in connection with which the gloves may be used.

Gloves which haverbeen found satisfactory have been formed of canvas and coated with polyvinyl chloride and shaped to exhibit the characteristics above set forth. Such gloves might be formed entirely of the plastic material without the foundation of canvas if such were desired.

The kind and character ofthe liquid plasticizers and other liquid constituents in the dispersion are such as to permit the coating when cured to function satisfactorily The plasticizers or other liquid constituents used in the resin dispersions facilitate provision of a coating which is fiexible, tough, and wearresistant. That degree of toughness and flexibility desired would determine the character of the plasticizer employed.

While coating by dipping is set forth above, it is apparent that any one of the known processes of coating might be employed. Following coating of the glove, and the coating is extended over the entire glove or that part that is intended to be coated, the coating is cured by subjecting the same while upon the form to the required heat to accomplish the desired cure. Such is carried out according to well known practices.

It is noted that the form upon which the fingers of the glove are placed (and in Fig. 6 only two fingers of a form are shown but it is understood that the form would be such as to fill all the fingers and thumb and palm portion of the glove) is of such size that the finger portions of the gloveare held expanded or distended to substantially their full extent but without undesirable stretching. It is also noted that the finger portions of the form shown are roughly square or rectangular in cross section so that the sides of the glove fingers extend substantially perpendicularly with respect to the working faces thereof. The backs of the fingers are held spaced from the working faces thereof. When the plastic coating which has been applied to the glove is cured and the form is removed, the fingers retain the shape to which they were set by the curing of the plastic coat, such coat being suficiently thick to maintain such set and the material of the coating being such as to preserve the necessary shape following cure.

In the construction shown, the fingers are formed in a generally square shape in cross section. In such shape when the fingers of a wearer are inserted into the fingers of the glove there will be provided within the fingers of the glove sufficient space along both sides and along the back of the fingers of the wearer to ensure free ventilation. The glove lingers do not closely hug the fingers of the wearer particularly along the sides and back thereof. The same is true as to the other coated portion of the glove such as the portion which covers the palm, the back of the hand, and thc thumb. Shapes other than the square shape might be used but it is desirable that whatever shape is employed, the sides extend substantially normal with respect to the Working face portion of the hand or lingers and support the back of the glove as hereinabove set forth. Y

Fig. 7 shows that the ends of the fingers are so shaped that the working face of the linger has a tip portion which facilitates picking up small objects. In other words, the end of the `linger slopes toward the back thereof from the working face substantially perpendicularly with respect to the working face. It cornes substantially to a line juncture with the working face.

v/hat l claim is:

1. A glove for the hand of a wearer having linger portions of fiexible sheet material cxteriorly coated with a thermoplastic adhered thereto and cured thereupon, said plastic coating being tough and fiexible and yet sufiiciently self-supporting to maintain the sides of the finger portions ofthe glove fully extended and disposed substantially normal to the working faces of said finger portions, the backs portion of said finger portions being rendered self-supporting by the plastic coating and extending between the side portions and supported thereby spaced by the width of the side portions from the working faces of the finger portions.

2. A glove for the hand having finger portions of suitable fiexible sheet material coated with a plastic coating which is tough .and fiexible and yet sumciently selfsupporting to maintain the backs of the finger portions supported spaced above the working faces of the finger portions by the fully extended width of the lsides of the finger portions, said sides being self-supporting and disposed substantially normal to the working faces of the finger portions providing finger portions which are individually substantially square in cross section.

3. A glove as define-d in claim l characterized in that the ends of the finger portions project approximately normal to the working faces thereof but slo-pe slightly rearwardly toward the backs of the finger portions and said endsof the finger portions meet the working faces thereof along substantially line edges.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,387,728 Kramer Aug. 16, 1921 2,343,220 Mason Feb. 29, 1944 2,713,548 White et al. July 19, 1955 2,716,241 Goodman Aug. 30, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1387728 *Feb 20, 1920Aug 16, 1921Edward KramerHand-covering
US2343220 *Jan 17, 1941Feb 29, 1944Wells Lamont CorpCurved glove
US2713548 *Feb 4, 1952Jul 19, 1955Harold WhiteMethod of making a protective glove
US2716241 *Mar 8, 1954Aug 30, 1955Pioneer Rubber CompanyGlove making method and glove
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2913729 *May 28, 1957Nov 24, 1959Edmont Mfg CompanyPerforated glove
US3026531 *May 24, 1960Mar 27, 1962Goodrich Co B FNeoprene glove
US3072914 *Mar 3, 1959Jan 15, 1963Galen Entpr IncDisposable sanitary glove and method of making same
US3148235 *May 31, 1961Sep 8, 1964Galen Entpr IncMethod of making plastic gloves
US3173150 *Jan 14, 1963Mar 16, 1965Edmont IncGloves and methods of construction
US3225360 *Jan 26, 1962Dec 28, 1965Charleston Rubber CompanySeamless article
US3416158 *Jul 31, 1967Dec 17, 1968Herman M. KulmanProtective glove
US3787898 *Oct 12, 1972Jan 29, 1974Walker CWriting facilitating glove
US3869726 *Jul 19, 1973Mar 11, 1975Siebe Gorman & Co LtdGlove liner and glove comprising such liner
US4001895 *Sep 4, 1975Jan 11, 1977Magid Glove Manufacturing Company, Inc.Paneled dip-coated work glove
US5113532 *Mar 8, 1991May 19, 1992Golden Needles Knitting & Glove Co., Inc.Method of making garment, garment and strand material
US5224363 *Jun 27, 1991Jul 6, 1993Golden Needles Knitting & Glove Co., Inc.Method of making garment, garment, and strand material
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/167
International ClassificationA41D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D19/0065
European ClassificationA41D19/00P2C