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Publication numberUS2840224 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1958
Filing dateApr 24, 1957
Priority dateApr 24, 1957
Publication numberUS 2840224 A, US 2840224A, US-A-2840224, US2840224 A, US2840224A
InventorsLefief Frank M
Original AssigneeBaljak Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conveying devices for accelerating and timing articles
US 2840224 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. M. LEFIEF June 24, 1958 CONVEYING DEVICES FOR ACCELEEATING AND TIMING ARTICLES Filed April 24, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 7 8 3 9. I aq a ounce coco a IH Q.

INVENTOR. FRANK M. LEF'IEF ATTORNEY June 24, 1958 F. M. LEFIEF com/2mm; DEVICES FOR ACCELERATING AND TIMING ARTICLES Filed April 24. 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 fi o o Z Z I a m. .h @m .0 O0 8 I 2 74 Q 3 H 3 Q k 3 v M l U fl. W

INVENTOR. FRA /v/( M. LEF/EF ATTORNEY F. M. LEFlEF 2,840,224

CONVEYING DEVICES FOR ACCELERATING AND TIMING ARTICLES June 24, 1958 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 24, 1957 INVENTOR. FRA IYK M LEF/EF BY g A TTOR/VEY F. M. LEFIEF June 24, 1958 CONVEYING DEVICES FOR ACCELERATING AND TIMING ARTICLES 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed April 24, 1957 IN VEN TOR. FRA NK M. L EF/EF BY W$.W

Fig. 6

ATTORNEY June 24, 1958 F. M. LEFIEF 2,840,224

CONVEYING osvxcss FOR ACCELERATING AND TIMING ARTICLES Filed April 24, 1957 7 Sheets-Shet 5 Fig. 9

INVENTOR. FRANK M. LEFIEF' A TTORNEY June 24, 1958 F. M. LEFIEF 2,340,224

CONVEYING DEVICES FOR ACCELERATING AND TIMING ARTICLES Filed April 24, 1957 7 Sheets$heet e INVENTOR. FRANK M. LEF/EF A TTORNE'Y June 24, 1958 F. M. LEFIEF 2 CONVEYING DEVICESFOR ACCELERATING AND TIMING ARTICLES Filed April 24, 1957' '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 INVENTOR. FRANK M. LEF/EF ATTORNEY 2,840,224 Patented June 24, 1958 nited States Patent Qfiiice CONVEYING DEVICES FOR ACCELERATING AND TIMING ARTICLES FrankM. Lefief, Palo Alto, Calif., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Baljak' Corporation, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Application April 24, 1957, Serial No; 654,928

17 Qlaims. (Cl.198'34)- This invention relates to the art of packaging.

Articles of merchandise to be packaged undergo a series of operations which are performed by special mechanical equipment at individual stations, and a conveyor is commonly employed for moving the articles from one station to the next. The conveyor motion may be of the stop-and-go type, in which case the output is relatively limited.-, The conveyor motion may also be continuous, in which event the output is greater.

There are many instances where a packagingstation must receive articles in a precisely defined position andin predetermined intervals of time. Frequently a further requirement is added, namely that the articles must pass the station at a predetermined rate of speed.

Problems arise where the supply to a conveyor or packaging line is irregular; Such instances occur, for example, where manual operationsare involved either. at the initial stage, or at an intermediate stage, of the packaging operation. Such situations arise, for example, where packages are manually filled, weighed, or checked. Similar situations arise at a point of convergence of the output of several fully mechanized supply lines in anyone of which irregularities may develop leading to a temporary scarcity or oversupply of articles which th'en'reach the packaging line singly, or in groups comprising a plurality of units backed up'end-to-end, with irregular space intervals between the units or groupsof units.

Further complications arise where from a point of sometimes'uniform and sometimes non-uniform supply the articles must be accelerated toa high velocity. for passage through subsequent stations.

Slow rates of acceleration are undesirable, since they result in a great length of the path during which the required acceleration takes place, thus requiring much floor space. Limits are set to the permissible rate of acceleration by the nature of the merchandisewhich may-bedamaged or displaced by too rapid rates of acceleration.

A typical example of the aforementioned problems is presented in the packagingof fresh fruits and vegetables about to be frozen. The food is packaged in preformed hinge-cover folding boxes. The packaging is generally done by hand and requires weighing, since many types of food do not lend themselves to loading by volumetric measurement. The output of a manual packaging and weighing line is by necessity non-uniform. At certain times individually filled boxes pass down the line while at other times boxes arrive in such numbers that they are backed up end-to-end. At this point the boxes are-still open, to be closed at a subsequent station at which the boxes pass an automatic box closing machine capable of operating at high rates of speed, up to 400 boxes per minute.

Where the packaged food is bulky and where there is danger that portions of the contents project above the top edges of the boxes, so as to interfere with the'operation of thebox closing machine, it isnecessary to compact the contents at a station before the closing station.

The compacting station is usually equipped with an 2- 7 i automatic machine for pressing downthe box contents below the top edgesof the box by means of paddles or plungers. During this operation the side walls andthe end .walls'- of the box must be firmly supported to prevent bursting of the box. Compacting machines are capable of operating at rates of the order of 400boxe's per minute, and it is readily seen that the box must arriv'e: at -the machine at a precisely predetermined moment and-in a precisely predetermined position so that'the paddle or plunger of the machine is accurately ce'ntered -and 'bears down on the contents, butnot on thetboxawa lls."

The compactingstation is followed: by a closing station at which the hinged coverof the'boxais closedand locked. The closed box is then usually overwrapped at an overwrapping station at whicha sheet of wax paper, regenerated cellulose or other suitable sheet. material is applied.

In the given example the problem of conveying. the filled boxes from a point of supply at which the boxes are practically at rest, or slowly moving, to a station past which the boxes must move at predetermined. spaced and timed intervals and at a predetermined high rate of speed is further complicated by the need for accelerating the boxes and their contents without dislocation or loss of a portion of the contents. Certain foods, such as linia beans, peas, Brussels sprouts, are easily thrown fron'rthe boxesunless the acceleration is' gradual;

Problems identical with or similar to the ones'describ'ed are encountered in other phases of the packaging industry and are solved by the present invention which provides a device which'accepts articles suppliedtovthe device in irregular order and conveys and delivers them, in timed and spaced order of delivery andat a prede termined high rate of speed.

The invention, illustrated and explained by its'particular application to a conveyingdevice for handling filled frozen food boxes, teaches how articles accepted-singly or in groups, with irregular spaces between individual articles and groups may be automatically separated-and spaced, accelerated, and, if desired, so controlled that they pass certain stations not only at a predetermined high linear velocity, but also in aarequired positionalrelationship. a s l The objects, features and advantages of this invention will appear more fully fromthe detailed description which follows accompanied by drawingsshowing; for the purpose of illustration, a preferred embodiment ofthe invention.- Theinvention also resides in certain new and original features of construction and combination, as well as sub-combination, of elements hereinafter set forth and claimed.

Although the characteristic features of this invention which are believed to be novel will be particularly pointed out'inv the claims appended hereto, the invention itself, its objects and advantages, and themanner'in which it may be carried out, may be better understood by referring to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part of it, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view, from above, of the receiving end of the conveying mechanism, the mechanism being shown empty of boxes; 7

Figure 2 shows the mechanism of Figure 1 after entry of two spaced boxes into the mechanism;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the mechanism'fof Figures 1 and 2 at an advanced stage of the operation at whichthe boxes shown in Figure 2.have' advanced and are followed by a group of boxes backed up end-toend;

Figure '4 shows themechanism of Figures 1 to 3 at a further advanced stage of the operation at which certain boxes have moved off and additional boxes are received;

, generic in their application.

- the receiving end of the machine;

- Figure 6 is a perspectiveview of the transfer portion, the direction of the view being toward the delivery endof themechanisrn atwhich the pack-down machine is located;

Figure 7 is a perspective side view of a portion of the drive lyingon the opposite side of the transfer portion shown in Figure T Figures 8 and 9 are perspective views, from above, showing the separation of boxes which are interlocked or entangled by reason of overlapping of cover flaps;

Figure 10 is a diagrammatic plan view of theportion of the conveying mechanism shown in Figure 1;

Figure 11' is a diagrammatic elevational view of the mechanism of Figure. 10 showing details of the drive, portions of which are also seen in Figure 7;

' Figure 12 is a diagrammatic plan view of a modified mechanism in which the timing conveyor has lugs along one side of the box track, instead of along both sides as shown in Figures 1 to 11; and

4 Figure 13 illustrates the action of the mechanism of Figure 12 when handling a group of boxes backed up 'end-to-end. s r In the following description and in the claims various details will be identified fby specific names for convenience. The names, however, are intended to be Corresponding reference characters refer to corresponding parts in the several figures of the drawings. a I

The drawings accompanying, and forming part .of,'this specificationdisclose certain specific details of the invention for the purpose of explanation ofv broader aspects, but it is understood that the details may be modified in various respects without departure from the principles of the invention and that the invention may be applied to other structures than the one shown.

'minute. The compacting mechanism is described and illustrated in considerable detail in a prior Patent No. 2,718,992 to T. R. Baker et al. dated September 27, 1955, entitled Pack-Down Machine for Folding Boxes and Cans.

As previously indicated, the compacting machine is served by a conveyor in which the filled folding boxes are walled in. along four sides to prevent bursting of the boxes when the plunger compresses the box contents below the level defined by the top edges of the box walls.

The walling in of the folding boxes is accomplished by two wide vertically extending rails along the conveyor. .These rails are stationary and engage the front wall of the box as well as the back'wall to which the cover is hinged. The conveyor proper carries an upright wall or plate for each box against which the leading side wall of the box bears, and a further wall or plate on the conveyor engages the trailing side wall of the box. The latter wallor plate of the conveyor is tharithe conveyor, so as to move the box against the front plate before the .backplate swings into vertical position to complete the enclosureof the box along its fourth side. a r

"The conveyor of a compacting machine is visible at the left of Figure 6 and will be described later.

cepts boxes either singly or in groups.

The conveyingmechanism about to be described in greater detail comprises a receiving conveyor which ac- The receiving conveyor is combined with a timing conveyor which automatically spaces the boxes and times them. An intermediate conveyor then picks "up the spaced and timed boxes and advances them to a delivery conveyor. The delivery conveyor discharges the boxes accurately timed and spaced and at a high linear velocity. In the illustrated application of the invention the delivery conveyor discharges into the conveyor of the pack-down machine.

During the travel of the boxes from the receiving end of the receiving conveyor to the discharge by the delivery conveyor the boxes are accelerated, but the acceleration is so gradual, even though occurring within a relatively short distance, as to prevent loss or even displacement of the box contents.

Referring now to the drawings, Figure 1 shows the receiving end of the conveying mechanism. A pair of rails 11 and 12 define a track 13 within which folding boxes may move from the far end towards the observer.

A receiving conveyor for feeding boxes into the track 13 comprises two friction belts 14 and 15 trained around pulleys 16, 17, 18 and 19 on horizontal shafts 20 and 21. Shaft 21 carries a sprocket gear 22 around which a drive chain 23 extends. Between the shafts 20 and 21 the belts 14 and 15 are supported by rollers 24. The receiving conveyor 14, 15 may he termed a vertical conveyor because the feed and return runs of the belts lie in substantially the same vertical plane.

A timing conveyor also extends into the track 13. The timing conveyor may be termed a horizontal conveyor and comprises chains 25 and 26 equipped with sets of lugs 27 and 28, respectively. The chains 25 and 26 extend around terminal sprocket gears 29, 30 and 31, 32 on vertical shafts 33, 34, 35 and 36. Shafts 34 and 36 are drive shafts and are also seen in Figures 6 and 7. a

The chains 25 and 26 are so spaced that only the lugs 27 and 28 protrude beyond the rails 11 and 12 and extend into the track 13. The lugs 27 of the chain 25 are staggered with respect to the lugs 28 of the chain 26, and the space between a lug and the opposite rail is slightly more than the width of the boxes to be handled. The space between the two rows of opposite lugs 27 and 28 is less than the width of the boxes.

The distance between alternate lugs, i. e. the distance from a lug 28 to the next lug 27 is less than the length of the box to be handled. These dimensions are also apparent from Figures 2 and 3 showing boxes 37 on the track 13. Supporting rails 38 and 39 support the lugs 27 and 28 and prevent sagging of the chains 25 and 26.

For the purpose of explanation of the operation of the device it may be assumed that the boxes to be handled measure four inches in width and five and onequarter inches in length. It may further be assumed that both belts 14 and 15 of the receiving conveyor move at a velocity of 6.5 inches per time unit, and that the lugs 27 and 28 of the timing chains advance at a slower velocity of 4.5 inches per time unit.

In Figures 2 to 7 the boxes 37 are shown without covers for the sake of clarity. The covers were removed so as not to obscure portions of the mechanism, particularly the lugs of the conveyors and other elements about to be described.

Figure 2 shows two boxes 37 and 37 Box 37, entered the track 13 first and was grasped by the receiving conveyor 14, 15, which engages the bottom of the box. Box 37 entered the track shortly after box 37 sufficiently later to provide a substantial space between the two boxes. It is apparent from Figure 2 that box 37 entered the track in a slightly slanted position.

The conveyor 14, 15 moves both boxes at a faster rate than the rate of advance of the lugs 27, 28 of the timing conveyor 25, 26. Because of its slanted position the box 37 cleared the lug 27 appearing near the center of the figure and is in a position in which its left leading corners will come to bear against the lug 28' appearing between the two boxes. When this happens, the traveling speed of the box which originally was 6.5 inches per time unit is reduced to 4.5 inches per time unit. Box 37 is shown in the position which box 37 will assume when it approaches the end of the run of the timing conveyor 25, 26, except that the box 37 will then be engaged by the lug 28 visible in Figure 2 between the two boxes.

It is also readily seen that box 37 would have engaged a lug 27, if the box had been slanted in the opposite direction when it entered the track 13. Since the distance between the lugs 27 and 28 is slightly less than the width of the boxes, spaced boxes automatically run into the row of lugs 27 or into the opposite row 28, whereafter the boxes advance at the rate of the timing conveyor.

Additional means are provided to insure positive engagement of the boxes by the lugs of the timing conveyor. Horizontally disposed pusher elements are provided which are so arranged that all boxes are positively forced into engagement with the lugs of the timing conveyor on one side or on the opposite side of the track.

Referring to Figure l, rotating arms 40 and 41 are mounted on vertical shafts 42 and 43. The shafts also carry sprocket gears 44 and 45 in mesh with the inner runs of the chains 25 and 26, resulting in rotation of the arms 40 and 41 in timed relationship with the lugs of the timing conveyor.

The distance between the end of the fully extended arm 40 and the opposite rail 12 is slightly more than the width of the box, but the distance between the arm 40 and the lug 28 is less than the width of the boxes, so

that boxes engaged by the arm are positively forced into engagement with one of the lugs 28. Similarly, the arm 41 swinging into the track from the opposite side forces boxes engaged by the arm 41 into engagement with the lugs 27.

This actionis illustrated in Figure 2 where the arm 40 is shown in approximately fully extended position in which box 37 is forcedinto the path of the lug 28 at the bottom of the illustration. At this phase of the operation the opposite arm 41 is in fully retracted position, 180 degrees out of phase with the arm 40.

In comparing the angular position of the arms 40 and 41 it should be remembered that arm 40 moves in a clockwise direction while arm 41 moves in a counterclockwise direction. At the instant illustrated in Figure 2 the arm 40 has moved a few degrees past the position in which it is fully extended into the track and arm 41 is shown an equal number of degrees advanced beyond the position in which it formed a right angle with regard to the rail 12.

Figure 3 illustrates the machine at a later phase of the operation at which the box 37 has nearly reached the end of the track 13. Three further boxes entered the track in the meantime. The first of these, identified as 37 has come to rest against the lug 27 visible near the center of the figure. The next two boxes, 37., and 37 are backed up end-to-end, but have assumed slightly staggered positions because of the staggered arrangement of the lugs 27, 28. The boxes are arrested with respect to the timing conveyor only by reason of the engagement of the leading box 37 with the lug 27 and will continue to advance in this position until box 37 is released by the timing conveyor. This is shown in Figure 4 illustrating the instant at which the lug 27, which had previously engaged the leading end of box 37 was just withdrawn from the track 13. At this point the released box 37 is advanced by an intermediate conveyor comprising belts 46 and 47 later to be described. At this point it is suflicient to state that the "6 intermediate conveyor 46, 47 moves at a higher velocity than the timing conveyor 25, 26, thereby removing the released box 37 at an accelerate'drate. v i

As soon as the box 37 is released by the lug 27which previously held it, the entire row of boxes 37 through 37'; advances under the action of the receiving conveyor 14, 15 which, as will be remembered, advances two inches farther per time unit thanth'e timing conveyor. The box 37 however, which previously was only retarded by its engagement with the trailing wall of the box 379 is only free to advance until it comes to bear against the lug 28 which is a fraction of an inch in advance of the box 37 and is visible. near the bottom of the figure. The box 37 cannot'escape engagement by the lug 28 because of the action of rotating pusher arm 40 which forces the box over, if the box' is not already in a'position to move against the lug 28. When the box 37 is finally released, the next box 37 comes to bear against the lug 27 visible just above the pusher arm 40 and the opposite pusher arm 41 insures that the box 37 will not miss the lug 27..

It is seen from Figure 4 that the staggered arrangement of the lugs on the timing conveyor automatically results in a corresponding arrangement of the boxes traveling along the track 13. Since folding boxes are deformable to a certain degree and since the boxes may comprise structural elements, such as covers or flaps (not shown in Figures 1 to 4) which c'ause'the boxes to be entangled to such an extent that theboxes undergo deformation rather than lateral shifting, the pusher arms 40 and 41 are provided as a safety measure to insure that each box prior to its release moves into positive engagement with one of the lugs of the timing conveyor. An example of such entanglement will later be described in connection with Figures 8 and 9.

Figure 5 illustrates the central portion of the conveying mechanism, the end of the rails 11 and 12 and the'beginning of further rails 111 and 112 which define a con tinuation 113 of the track 13 beyond theend of the timing conveyor 25, 26.

The run of the intermediate conveyor-46, 47 is coextensive withthe end of the run of the timing conveyor, and boxes released by the timing conveyor are frictionally engaged by the intermediate conveyor and accelerated before being moved into the grip of a further'delivery conveyor also located between the rails 111 and 112.

The belts 46 and 47 of the intermediate conveyor are trained around pulleys 48 and 49 on the shaft 21 (Figure 1) at one end and the other end of the intermediate conveyor is defined by further pulleys 50, 51 (Figure 6).

The intermediate conveyor 46, 47 frictionally engages the bottom of the boxes and advances them at an accelerated rate of the order of 8.75 inches per time unit into the track extension 113.

The ditference between the speed of 4.5 inches per time unit of the timing conveyor, and the speed of 8.75 inches per time unit of the intermediate conveyor automatically causes separation of boxes which were backed up end-to-end during their travel between the rails 11 and 12.

The delivery conveyor comprises a substantially vertically disposed chain 52 carrying lugs 53 moving alongside the intermediate conveyor 46, 47. The run of the delivery conveyor 52 is coextensive with the end of the run of the intermediate conveyor 46, 47 which feeds the conveyor 11 inches in the illustrated example. The lugs 53 of the delivery conveyor 52 are so timed that boxes carried by the intermediate conveyor 46, 47 move into the path of the lugs 53,sorne .distancel behind the last lug raised into the path of the track portion 113, but well in advance of the next lug 53'about to rise into the path ofthe boxes at. the end of the delivery? conveyor. This relationship is illustratedin Figure 6 where the box 37 is being moved into the track portion 113 ,behind the box 37 whose of the next lug 53 which moves into the path of the boxes behind the b01137, as the chain 52 moves around the end sprocket wheel 54 (Figure 11).

By reason of the higher speed of the delivery conveyor 52 the lug 53, whichis shown some distance behind the box 37,, catches up to the box and positively advances it by the time the box hasreached the position occupied by the box 37 in Figure 6. i

Once the boxes are engaged by the lugs 53 of the delivery conveyor they advance at intervals determined by the spacing of the lugsj53 at thelhigh rate of speed of the delivery conveyor. ,7

In Figure 6 the delivery conveyor is shown to discharge the boxes into the pockets of a further conveyor forming a part of a packdown machine. The chain portion of the conveyor 60 of the packdown machineis not visible, but the elements. between which the boxes' are walled in are shown. These comprise twofixed lateral rails 58 and 59 snugly engaging the front and back Walls of the boxes. The conveyor 60 carries upright leading walls or plates 61 and trailing walls 62 hingedly arranged and so controlled that the walls are automatically moved downto admit a box, as the. respective conveyor pocket moves intothe space between the lateral rails 58 and 59. The box 37 in advance of the box 37 in Figure 6 is in the process of being moved against a' leading wall 61 of the conveyor 60. At this moment the box 37 is still being advanced by the lug 53 engaging its trailing side wall. Shortly thereafter the lug 53 withdraws downwardly as, the chain 52 moves around its far end sprocket (not visible). At this moment the hinged trailing wall 62 of the conveyor pocket rises, so that the box 37 is now confined along .all four walls in preparation of the decent of the pad or plunger 63 of the packdown machine which enters the space between the box walls and compacts the box contents to a level below the top edges of the box walls. i

In Figure 6, as in the preceding figures, the boxes are shown with theircovers removed. In actual practice, however, the box covers extend upright from the back walls of the boxes on the far side with respect to the observer, and a guide rail 64 isprovided for deflecting any box covers which might accidentally lean over a box body as the boxes approach the packdown station.

Figures 8 and 9 show filled boxes passing towards the intermediate conveyor 46, 47. The boxes are frozen food boxeswith box covers 65. The covers include flaps along three sides which during the closing operation are folded over and locked'with the front and side walls of the box. A detailed disclosure of this form of hinge cover box is found in the United States patent to Stenger, No. 2,785,845, issued March 19,1957.

Prior to the closing of the ,boxes the fiapsof the box cover overlap, if the boxes are backed up end-to-end. This position is shown in Figure 8 where the trailing flap 66 of the cover 65 on the box about to be released by the timing conveyor overlaps the inside of the'leading flap 67 extending from the cover 65 of the next box. This overlap tends to draw the second box away from thelug 28. At thismoment the pusher arm comes into action and forces the leading end of the second box towards the The gear 22 is also visible in Figure l.

rail 12. Figure 9 illustrates the result of this operation and shows the second box a safe marginbehind the lug 28 to insure timing of the box prior to its release to the action of the intermediate conveyor 46, 47.

The shifting of the second box involves a flexing or folding of the flaps 66 and 67 along their respective fold lines.

The driving mechanism of the conveying device and the interrelation between the various conveyors is best explained by referring to thediagrarnmatic Figures 10 and ll.

The main drive shaft 55 of the conveying device carries a chain gear 56 around which the drive chain 57 extends. The chain 57 in the installation shown in Figure 6 extends to a further gear 68 on a power driven shaft 69 of the packdown machine which contains a main prime mover for operating the packdown machine and the conveying mechanism which feeds it.

Referring again to Figures 10 and 11, the drive shaft 55 carries a sprocket gear 70 from which a drive chain 71 extends to a further sprocket gear 22 on the shaft 21. The shaft 21 carries the end pulleys 18, 19 of the vertical receiving conveyor whose other terminal pulleys 16, 17 are on the shaft 20. The receiving conveyor 14 extends over three guide rollers 24 of which the third one, counting from the left, changes the direction of the upper run of the conveyor 14 so as to move away from the boxes which are about to be engaged by the intermediate conveyor 46, 47.

The drive shaft 21 further carries drive pulleys 48, 49 for the intermediate conveyor belts 46 and 47. The pulleys 48 and 49 have a larger diameter than the pulleys 1.8, 19, thereby imparting to the conveyors 46, 47 a higher linear speed than the speed of the conveyors 14, 15.

The chain 71 which extends from the gear 70 and drives the sprocket gear 22 also extends over an idler sprocket gear 72.

The main drive shaft 55 further carries the sprocket gear 54 around which the delivery conveyor chain 52 carrying lugs 53 is trained. A further sprocket gear 73 on the drive shaft 55 carries a drive chain 74 extending over an idler gear 75 and a sprocket gear 76 on a shaft 77. The shaft 77 is also visible in Figure 7 and carries teeth and gear 54 as having 44 teeth.

Gear 76 on shaft 77 is shown as having 14 teeth and being driven by the gear 73 which has 28 teeth. The sprocket gear 22 on the shaft 21 is indicated as having 15 teeth and being driven by the gear 70 which has 21 teeth. The gear 44 of the rotating arm 40 and the gear 30 of the timing conveyor are ,both indicated as having 18 teeth.

Figures 12 and 13 illustrate a modification of the receiving and timing conveyors in which only one timing conveyor chain 25 having lugs 27 is employed. The conveyor chain 25 extends around gears 29 and 30 and is driven in the same manner as previously described. For the purpose of an example of relative conveyor velocities it may be assumed that the conveyor chain 25 moves at the rate of 4.5 inches per time unit. Its cooperating pusher arm 41 is mountcd oppositely, as in the previously described form of the mechanism, but makes twice as many revolutions.

The, receiving conveyor is of modified construction and comprises two friction belts 14 and 15 of which the belt 15' moves ata faster rate than the belt 14. A suit- 9 able speed relationship is 6.5 inches per time unit for the belt 14 and 7.75 inches pertime unit for the belt '15.

As a: result, boxes entering the track 13 are pivoted clockwisely to run against the lugs 27 of the timing con veyor 25. Figure 12 illustrates the position which spaced boxes 37 assume within the track 13. The boxes are pivoted until'their left trailing corner meets the rail 12 whereafter they advance as shown.

Figure 13 illustrates the passage of boxes through the conveyor which were backed up end-to-end when entering. The pressure between the boxes prevents the boxes from pivoting fully. When the boxes reach the position at which the arm 41 engages the boxes, they are pivoted to such an extent that they cannot escape the arresting action of the lugs 27.

Obviously the principles of the invention explained in their particular application to a conveyor for supplying a pack-down machine may be applied with similar advantages to conveying devices for other purposes.

What is claimed is:

l. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the ar ticles at such velocity in timed and spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track'for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; a timing conveyor having spaced lugs laterally disposed with respect to the track for engaging the leading ends of articles moved on said track by said receiving conveyor, said timing conveyor being coextensive with a least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; means within the extent of said. timing conveyor for laterally displacing at least theleading ends of articles on said track into engagement with lugs of said timing conveyor; an intermediate conveyor for receivingand frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; a delivery conveyor having spaced lugs thereon, the beginning of the delivery conveyor being spaced from'the end-of the timing conveyor, but overlapping a portion of the extent of said'intermediate conveyor, the lugs of the delivery conveyor being so timed that they move into the path of said track behind articles carried on said intermediate conveyor, the length of the delivery conveyor being sufiicient to permit its lugs to catch up with articles conveyed by said friction conveyor so that its lugs engage the backs of articles moved by said friction conveyor and advance them positively; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, the speed of the intermediate conveyor is higher than the speed of the receiving conveyor, and the speed of the delivery conveyor is the highest.

2. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and fordelivering the articles at such velocity in timed and spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; atiming'conveyor having lugs lata deliveryconveyor having lugs spaced apart farther than the. length of the articles to be conveyed, the beginning of the delivery conveyor being spaced from the end of the timing conveyor, but'o'erlapping a portion of the extent of said intermediate conv'eyor, the lugs of the de livery conveyor being so timed that they move into the path of said track behind articles carried on said intermediate conveyor, the length of the delivery conveyor being sufiicient to permit its lugs to catch up with articles conveyed by said friction conveyor so that its lugs engage the backs of articles moved by said friction conveyor and advance them positively; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, the speed of themtermediate conveyor is higher than the speed of the receiving conveyor, and the speed of the delivery conveyor is the highest.

3. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles at such velocity in timed and spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track;'a timing conveyor having lugs disposed along one side of the track and adapted to engage the leading ends of articles on said track by said receiving conveyor, said lugs being spaced less than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; a pusher projectible intoand retractable v from the path of the articles moving on said track, said pusher being mounted on the other side of the track opposite saidlugs and timed with regard to said timing conveyor for displacing the leading ends of said articles into the path of the lugs, the space between the lugs and the projectecl pusher being less than the Width of the articles; an intermediate conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; a delivery conveyor having lugs spaced apart farther than the length of the ar ticles to be conveyed, the beginning of the delivery conveyor being spaced from the end of the timing conveyor, but overlapping a portion of the extent of said intermediate conveyor, the lugs of the delivery conveyor being so timed that they move into the path of said track behind articles carried on said intermediate conveyor, the length of the delivery conveyor being sufiicient to permit its lugs to catch up with articles conveyed by said friction conveyor so that its lugs engage the backs of articles moved by said friction conveyor and advance them positively; and commondrive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, the speed of the intermediate conveyor is higher than the speed of the receiving conveyor, and the speed of the delivery conveyor is the highest.

4. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles at such'velocityin timed and spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles. are movable;la receiving conveyor "below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing timing conveyor and adapted to engage articles moving on said traclr to displace the leading ends of said articles into the path of the lugs of one row or the other, o'ne'of said pushers being mounted on one side of the track, the other pusher being mounted on the opposite side of the track and longitudinally offset with respect to the one pusher; an intermediateconveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; a delivery con- ,veyor having lugs spacedapart farther than the length ticles moved by said friction conveyor and advance them positively; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, the speed of the intermediate conveyor is higher than the speed of the receiving conveyor, and the speediof the delivery conveyor is the highest.

5. A device for gradually'accelerating articles, such as foldingboxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles at such velocity in timed and spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articlesare'movable; a substantially vertically disposed receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging the underside of articles on said track; a substantiallyhorizontally disposed timing conveyor having lugs laterally extending into the path of articles on said track for engaging the leading ends of articles advanced on said trackby said receiving conveyor, said lugs being spaced less than the lengthof the articles to be conveyed, the run of the timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; a pusher arm mounted for rotation in a substantially horizontal plane and adapted to swing into and out of the path of articles moving, on said track to engage the sides of said articles and displace at least the leading ends of the articles into the path of lugs of the timing conveyor opposite said pusher arm, said pusher arm being geared to rotate in timed relationship with said timing conveyor; an intermediate conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; a delivery conveyor having lugs spaced apart farther than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the beginning of the delivery conveyor being spaced from the end ofthe timing conveyor, but overlapping a portion of the extent 'of'said intermediate conveyor, the lugs, of the delivery the speed of the timing conveyor is; the slowest, the speed 7 of the receiving conveyor is higher, the speed of the in- 'termediate conveyorishigher, than the speed of the receiving conveyor, and the speed of the delivery conveyor is the highest. I

6. A device for gradually accelerating articles, suchas folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined, velocity. and for delivering the articles at such velocity in timed and spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a substantially vertically disposed receiving conveyor below said track for fric- '12 a a a tionally engaging the underside, of articles on said track; a substantiallyhorizontally disposed timing conveyor composed of two horizontally disposedconveyor units carrying lugs laterally extending into the path of articles on said track, said lugs being adapted to engage the leading endsof articles advanced on said tracklby said receiving conveyor, the lugs of one unit being staggered with respect to the lugs of the other unit, successive lugs of the timing conveyor being spaced less than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; two pusher arms mounted for rotation in a substantially horizontal plane and adapted to swing into and out of the path of articles moving on said track, one arm being mounted on one side of the track, the other arm being mounted on the opposite side of the track and offset with respect to the one arm in the direction of the track, said arms being adapted to engage the sides of the articles and displace at least the leading ends of the articles into the path of the lugs of the timing conveyor unit opposite the respective pusher arm, said pusher arms being geared to rotate in timed relationship with said timing conveyor; an intermediate vertically disposed conveyor for receiving, and frictionally engaging the underside of, articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of said timing conveyor; a substantially vertically disposed delivery conveyor having lugs spaced farther apart than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the beginning of the delivery conveyor being spaced from the end of said timing conveyor, but overlapping a portion of the extent of said intermediate conveyor, the lugs of the delivery conveyor being so timed that they move into the path of said track behind articles carried on said intermediate conveyor, the length of the delivery conveyor being sufiicient to permit its lugs to catch up with articles conveyed by said friction conveyor so that its lugs engage the backs of articles moved by said friction conveyor and advance them positively; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, the speed of the intermediate conveyor is higher than the speed of the receiving conveyor, and the speed of the delivery conveyor is the highest.

7. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, 'to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles at such velocity in timed and spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track, said receiving conveyor comprising two conveyor units of which one moves at a higher rate of speed than the other, thus tending to pivot articles engaged thereby; a timing conveyor having spaced lugs along one side of said track for engaging the leading ends of articles advancing and pivoting on said track, said timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor, its lugs being adjacent the slower of the two units of the receiving conveyor; an intermediate conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; a delivery conveyor having spaced lugs thereon, the beginning of the delivery conveyor being spaced from the end of the timing conveyor, but overlapping a portion of the extent of said intermediate conveyor, the lugs of the delivery conveyor being so timed that they move, into the path of said track behind articles carried on said intermediate conveyor, the length of the delivery conveyor being sufficient to permit its lugs to catch up with articles conveyed by said friction conveyor so that its lugs engage the backs of articles moved by said friction conveyor and advance them positively; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds ofwhich the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speeds of both units of the receiving conveyor are higher than the speed of the timing conveyor, and'the speed of the intermediate conveyor is higher than the speed of the faster of the units of the receiving conveyor, and the speedof the delivery conveyor is the highest.

8. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocityand for delivering the articles in uniformly spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forminga track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; a timing conveyor having spaced lugs laterally disposed with respect to the track for engaging the leading ends of articles moved on said track by said receiving conveyor, the said timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; means within the extent of said timing conveyor for laterally displacing at least the leading ends of articles on said track into engagement with lugs of said timing conveyor; a further conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, and the speed ofsaid further conveyor is" higher than the speed of said receiving conveyor.

9. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding'boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for deliveringv the articles in' uniformly spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; a timing conveyor having lugs along at least one side of the track for engaging the leading ends of articles moved on said track by said receiving conveyor, successive lugs being spaced less than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of saidreceiving conveyor; means within the extent of the timing conveyor for laterallydisplaci'ng at least the leading end of articles on said trackinto'engagement with lugs on the timing conveyor; a'further conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timingconveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor ishigher, and the speed of said further conveyor is higher than the speed of said receiving conveyor.

A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predeterminedvelocity and for delivering the articles in uniformly spaced order, the-device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articleson' said track; a timing conveyor having a row of lugs along one side of the track and a further row of lugs along the opposite side of the track, the lugs of the one row being staggered with respect to the lugs of the other row, successive lugs of the timing conveyor being spaced apart less than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; means within the extent of the timing conveyor for laterally displacing at least the leading end of articles filling the track alternately into engagement with the lugs within one row and the other row; a further conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of thetiming conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, and the speed of saidfurt'ner conveyor is higher than the speed of said receiving conveyor.

ll.' A devicefor gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles in uniformly spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receivingconveyor below said track for frictionally engaging'and advancing articles on said track; a timing conveyor having lugs along the side of the track for engaging the leading ends" of articles moved on said track by said receiving conveyors, successive lugs being spaced less than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the timing conveyor being coextensive with'at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; a pusher periodically projectible into the path of articles moving on said track, said pusher being timed with regard to said timing conveyor and mounted on the side of the track opposite said lugs,'the distance between the projected pusher and the row of lugs being less than the width of the articles, so that the projected pushed displaces the leading ends of the articles into the path of the lugs; a further conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, and'the speed ofsaid further conveyor is higher than the speed of said receiving conveyor.

12. A' device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles in uniformly spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track;

lugs of the other row, successive lugs of the timing conveyor being spaced less than the length of'the articles to be conveyed, the'timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; 7 a pair of pushers projectible into and retractable from the path of the articles moving on said track, said pushers being timed with regard to said timing conveyor and adapted to engage articles moving on said track to displace the leading ends of said articles into the path of the lugs of one row orthe' other, one of said pushers being mounted on one side of the track, the other pusher being mounted on the opposite side of the track and longitudinally oifset with respect to the one pusher; a further conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released'by said timing conveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; and common drive means for driving said con veyors at interrelated speeds ,of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, thespeed of the receiving conveyor is higher, and'the speed of said further conveyor 'is'h'igher than the speed of said receiving conveyor.

13. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles in uniformly spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; a substantially horizontally disposed timing conveyor havingrlugs along at least one side of the track for engaging the leading ends of articles moved on said track by said receiving conveyor, successive lugs being spaced less than the length of the articles to be conveyed, the timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portions of said receiving conveyor; a pusher arm "is, a

mountedfor rotation in asubstantially horizontal plane and adapted toswing into and out of the path of articles moving on said tracltto engage-the sides or said articles and displace at least ,theleading ends of the articles into the path of the lugs of the timing conveyor opposite said engaging articles-released bysaid timing conveyor at the end of the, timing "conveyor; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds 'of which,

. the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, and the speed of I saidturther conveyor is higher than the speed of said receiving conveyor.

14. A device for gradually accelerating articles, such as folding boxes, supplied to the device inirregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles in uniformly spaced order, the device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along. which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said trackv for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; a timingconveyor composed of two horizontally disposed conveyorunits carrying lugs extending into the path ofarticles on said track adjacentthe sides of the track, said lugs being adapted to engage the leading ends of articles advanced on said track by said receiving conveyor, the lugs of one unit being staggered with respect tothe lugs of the other unit, successive lugs of, the timing conveyor being spaced less than the length of articles to be conveyed, the timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor; two pusher arms mounted for rotation in a substantially horizontal plane and adapted to swing into and out of the path lugs of 'the timing conveyor unit opposite the respective pusher arm, saidpusher arms being geared to rotate in timedrelationship with said timing conveyor; a further conveyor for receiving and, frictionally engaging articles released by said timingconveyor at the end of the timing conveyor; and common drive means for driving said conveyors at interrelated speeds of which the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the speed of the receiving conveyor is higher, and the speed of said further conveyor is higher than the speed of said receiving conveyor.

15. 'A device for gradually accelerating articles, such asrfolding boxes, supplied to the device in irregular order, to a predetermined velocity and for delivering the articles in uniformly spaced order, the device comprising, in

combinatiommeans forming a track alonglwhich said articles are movable; a receiving conveyor below said track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; said receiving conveyor comprising two conveyor units of'which one moves at a higher rate of speed than the other, thus tending to pivot articles enreceiving conveyor.

1e 7 g a gaged thereby; a timing conveyor having spaced lugs along one sideof said track for engaging the leading ends of articles advancing and pivoting on said track,

:sa'id'timing conveyor being coextensive with at least the end portion of said receiving conveyor, its lugs being adjacent the slower of the two units of the receiving conveyor; a further conveyor for receiving and frictionally engaging articles released by said timing conveyor at the endof the timing conveyor; and common drive means for driving said conveyor at interrelated speeds of which .the speed of the timing conveyor is the slowest, the

speeds of both units of the receiving conveyor are higher than the speed of the timing conveyor, and the speed of said further conveyor is higher than the speed of said .16. In a device for conveying and delivering articles,

such: as folding boxes, supplied to the devicein irregular order, in timed and spaced order of delivery, the 'device comprising, in combination, means forming a track along which said articles are movable; a receiving conveyorbelowsaid track for frictionally engaging and advancing articles on said track; a timing conveyor hav- 'ing spaced lugs laterally disposed with respect to the track for engaging the leading ends ,ofarticles moved on said track by said receiving conveyor, the timing conveyor being coextensive with atleast the end portion of said receiving conveyor; means within the extent of the timing conveyor for laterally displacing at least the leading ends of articles on said track into engagement with lugs of said timing conveyor, said lugs being spaced less than the length of the articles to be conveyed; and drive means for moving said receiving conveyor at a higher linear speed than said timing conveyor. v.

17. In'a device for conveying and delivering articles, such as folding boxespsup'plied to the device in irregular order, in timed and spaced order of delivery, the device tcornprising, in combination, means forming a track along of articles moving on said track, said pusher being timed with regard to said timingconveyor and mounted on the side of thetrack opposite said lugs, the distance between the projected pusher and the lugs being less than the width of the articles, so that the projected pusher displaces the leading ends of the articles into the path of said lugs; and drive means for propelling said receiving conveyor at a higher linear speed than said timing conveyor.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Guefiroy Feb. 1 2, 1957 Jones Sept. 10, 1957 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 2,840,224 June 24, 1958 Frank Ma Lefief It is hereby certified that error appears in the-printed specification of the above "numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1, line 60, for "individually" read m individual column '7,

line 48, for "decent" read descent column 14, line 23, for "pushed" read pusher Signed and sealed this 2nd day of December 1958o XSEAL) ttest:

Attesting Oflicer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3072095 *Apr 1, 1957Jan 8, 1963United States Gypsum CoAutomatic spraying apparatus
US3103237 *Aug 10, 1960Sep 10, 1963Jefferson Crum EbenWire handling apparatus
US3110388 *May 8, 1961Nov 12, 1963Elliott GeorgeLive poultry conveyor and counter
US3139663 *Sep 29, 1961Jul 7, 1964Joseph I BoswellConcrete casting machine
US3250375 *Sep 20, 1963May 10, 1966Rapids Standard Co IncTiming conveyor
US3352403 *Jul 12, 1966Nov 14, 1967Kliklok CorpDevices for accelerating and timing articles
US3452855 *May 3, 1966Jul 1, 1969Kliklok CorpConveying device for accelerating and timing articles
US4101020 *Mar 1, 1977Jul 18, 1978H. J. Langen & Sons Ltd.Packaging machine transfer mechanism
US4124113 *Jun 9, 1977Nov 7, 1978The Lodge & Shipley CompanyCase indexer
US4569181 *Feb 10, 1984Feb 11, 1986Standard-Knapp, Inc.Case feed for continuous motion packer
US5341915 *Nov 6, 1992Aug 30, 1994Kliklok CorporationArticle phasing, transfer and squaring system for packaging line
US5379879 *Oct 21, 1993Jan 10, 1995Bielomatik Leuze Gmbh & Co.Positioning device for a piece good
US6000528 *Jun 22, 1998Dec 14, 1999Klockner Hansel Tevopharm B.V.Conveyor device for accelerating a series of products
US6557693 *Jun 3, 1999May 6, 2003Knapp Logistik Automation GmbhConveyor section arrangement for containers being filled with items or bulk material at a filling station
US6585262 *May 9, 2001Jul 1, 2003Nec CorporationConveying interval adjusting method and apparatus
US6634487 *Dec 11, 2001Oct 21, 2003Sig Pack Systems AgConveying apparatus for forming and loading groups of containers
DE1284349B *Oct 16, 1964Nov 28, 1968Kliklok CorpVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Schliessen, Ausrichten und Verkleben von Klappdeckel-Faltschachteln mit drei Deckelklappen
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/461.1, 53/77, 198/726
International ClassificationB65G17/26, B65G17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65G2201/02, B65G17/26, B65G2811/0631, B65G17/002
European ClassificationB65G17/26, B65G17/00B