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Publication numberUS2840267 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1958
Filing dateOct 10, 1955
Priority dateOct 10, 1955
Publication numberUS 2840267 A, US 2840267A, US-A-2840267, US2840267 A, US2840267A
InventorsNelson Howard N
Original AssigneeKimberly Clark Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing carton
US 2840267 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.June 24, 1958 H. N. NELSON 2,840,267 w DISPENSING CARTON Filed Oct. 10, I955 United States Patent DISPENSING CARTON Howard N. Nelson, Neenah, Wis., assignor to Kimberly- Clark' Corporation, Neenah, Wis., a corporation of Delaware Application October 10,1955, Serial No. 539,374 3 Claims. 01. 22148) The present invention relates to a dispensing carton for sheet material which is arranged in a stack so as to be self-feeding, as the sheets are withdrawn from the stack, and it has especialutility in connection with interfolded tissues of the type generally referred to as facial or cleansing tissues. More particularly, this application is directed to an improvement of the dispensing carton described and claimed in my copending application Serial No. 511,841, filed May 31, 1955, and is a continuationin-part of such earlier application.

In the packaging of sheet material which is to be dispensed one at a time, it is desirable to use a carton which is provided with a relatively narrow sheet dispensing opening, and to have the sheets arranged in a stack within the carton, as by interfolding or other suitable means, so that as each sheet is withdrawn'it causes the succeeding sheet .to follow and remain partially extending through the dispensing opening. Restricting the area of the sheet dispensing opening is important for sanitary reasons, it being undesirable to have any great portion of the stack of sheets exposed to collect dirt etc. The feature of having a self-feeding arrangement. for the several sheets in the stack is an obvious convenience.

It is also desirable, of course, that the self-feeding arrangement be operable to provide one sheet at a time throughout the use of the entire packaging. This has been particularly difficult to achieve heretofore, and the difficulties have been increased with the advent of deeper cartons containing a greater number of sheets. As the pile diminishes and the angle at which the sheets are moved toward the dispensing opening approaches the vertical, it becomes more diflicult to separate the sheets and, consequently, there is a tendency to withdraw a plurality of sheets instead of but one as desired. Further, withthis vdifficulty inseparating the sheets and the reduction in the weight of the package due to removal of most of the sheets, there is a tendency to lift or move the carton, as the leading sheet is pulledfrom .the carton and sufiicient force is applied to separate the .sheet from the stack in the carton. This latter condition is particularly disturbing when the user attempts to withdraw a tissue and :has only one hand available for the job.

Still another difliculty that'is encountered in the packagingof sheets of the type referred :to above, particularly with larger packs of tissues and-the like, is the satisfactory accommodation of bulk variationv of the tissues. The amount of moisture in the surrounding atmosphere plays an important part in determining the bulk of a package of sheets, and this bulk may vary quite widely. Consequently, it is desirable to provide "a carton which can accornmodatetthis bulk variation in a :given. number of sheets, without :having the pack too loose in the carton when the bulk .isqlow and yet will permit proper withdrawal of the sheets one at a time, when the bulk is high zandthe pack presses against the top of the carton.

The :principal object of :the present .invcntionis to provideanimproved'carton for dispensing tissue sheets and V of dispensing opening, which is particularly ettective in separating the sheets as they are withdrawn, from the carton. a

The selected embodiment of the invention'is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein: Y a

Fig. 1 is a perspectiveviewlof the closed carton;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view showing the carton opened and in use;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 33 in Fig. .2; and

Fig. 4 is a plan view of a blank for forming the carton shown in the preceding figures.

The present invention has special utility in packages .of sheet material, wherein the sheets are interfolded or otherwise arranged for sequential self-feeding, with each sheet being made accessible through the dispensing .opening by movement of the preceding sheet. Consequently, the invention .is described with respect to a carton designed especially for a stack of tissues or the. like which are so arranged. It should be noted, however, that .certain of the disclosed features are of more generalutility and may be used advantageously in other types of cartons,

various package arrangements, and with other types .of

sheet material. a

With reference now to the drawings, wherein the selected embodiment of the invention is illustrated, it :is seen that there is provided a carton 10 having a dispensing opening 12 defined in the top of the carton. More particularly, as seen inFigure .4, the cartonis formed from a generally rectangularly-shaped, paperboard .blank 14 having fold. or crease lines 16 therein defining the bottom 18, top 20, .and a pair of sidewalls or panels 22 and 24. Each of these. walls include .tabportions at opposite ends thereof for forming the .endsof the carton, and there is also provided a narrow strip 28 adjacentthe free side of the bottom-defining wall 18of the blank to afford means for securing the bottomto the side wall 24. The dispensing opening 12 is formedby' a linear .cut 30 in the top panel 20, which extends from one end of'the carton to the opposite .end. The line 30, which maybe either in the .form of a continuous .cut .or an interrupted cut, such as the perforated line .shown in ,Fig- 1 ofthe drawings, starts adjacent one end of the carton with a cut 32 in the end flap 2 6 and then crosses the end edge or told 36 intothe top panel 20. The line 30 then cur-ves toward the side edge of the top panel ,Ztlbefore taking a relatively sharp, reverse curve to form the curved section indicated at 38. The dispensingopening continues from the .curved section 38 with an oppositely curvingsection 40 which terminates in ,a central portion of the ,line 30. This central portion of theopening-defining,cut 30 is generally straight in the illustrated embodiment, and the dispensing opening continues at the other .end, of the carton in curving. sections 40a and 38a which are similar to sections 40 and .38, respectively, but which curve in opposite directions. The section 38a of the opening ends in a cut 32a extending into the adjoining .end flap 2.6. In this manner, thedispensing opening is preferably made symmetrical with respectto the. intersection of the longitudinal and the transverse axes of the carton. This centrosymmetrical feature of the access opening ofiers an important advantage in that it provides for a balancing of the forces exerted on the top panel during withdrawal of a tissue therefrom, and thus aids in preventing tipping of the box during such use. Although the central portion of the illustrated opening 12 is generally a straight line and is inclined slightly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the carton, it will become apparent as the disclosure 13 progresses that the present invention has utility with other forms of dispensing openings. T

A very important feature of the disclosed embodiment is the proyision-of, means for effectively separating each sheet fror'njthe remainderof'the stack' as it is withdrawn from the carton. More particularly, it will be noted that theicurving line 30 which forms the dispensing opening includestheoppositely but similarly curving end portions 38 and 38a, which are joined at their inner ends to the central section of the dispensing opening through another pair of oppositely curving portions 40 and 40a, respectlvely. These oppositely curving flap or finger portions 40 and 40a arejparticular'ly effective with stacks of interfolded tissues, in alternately acting upon the second "sheet in the stack to deter the movement of this sheet through the opening30 and thereby aid in the withdrawal of the first sheet. Further, if the int'erfolded sheets are held together by bonds, the flaps 40 and, 40a provide a resistance to the withdrawal of thesecond sheet to thereby facilitate breaking sheet,

This action .of the flapsorfingers 40 and 40a is illustrated in Fig. 3,"where it isiseen that the finger 40 bears against the leading edge of the second sheet S to hold back the latter as the first'sheet S is being withdrawn through the dispensing opening. In the illustrated example, the sheets are lightly bonded together, as well as interfolded, and the bond holding the first sheet Syis indicated at bon the side of the second sheet S opposite the finger 40 and generally adjacent the fold in the second sheet S5. Consequently, in holding the second sheet S the fingers 40 permit more of thewithdrawal force to be applied to the breaking of the bond b which is holding the first sheet against separation from the stack. Similarly, after sheet S is removed and sheet S becomes the leading sheet, the finger 40aat the opposite end of the carton iseffective infassisting in-the separation-of the sheet S from its succeeding sheet S5. The latter are bonded together at b (Fig. 3), and the succeeding sheet S is, therefore, disposed to the left of sheet S Consequently. the finger 40a is disposed toIenga'ge the upper edge of sheet 8;; and. retard its movement as sheet is withdrawn from the carton.

It is seen, therefore, thatthe function provided by the fingers 40 and 40ais important in making possible one-ah, a-time withdrawal of the sheets from the carton. An additional advantage is gained as the stack nears the bottom of the carton and. the force required to separate the top 'sheetfrom thestack may be' sufficient tolift 'or tip the box. With the fingers 40 and 40a acting in the described manner, a greatly reduced force is ,sufiicient to separate line is used.

The use-of alinear cut for the dispensing opening 12 and theextension of the ends 32 and 32a of the cut.

into the end panels 26, of the carton also provide certain other advantages: For) example, this arrangement divides thefcarton top into two relatively narrow sec tions, which are sufii cientlyfie'xible to accommodate opening of the carton and withdrawal of the upper tissues without damagingthe carton or the sheets, when the carton is tightly filled with highbulk tissue.

.Furthermore'fthe adjoining edges of the dispensing opening remain in substantial contact after the carton is opened. Consequently, as a sheet ,is. withdrawn, the two sections of'the top panel fiex sufiicierltly to permit easy withdrawal of the tissue. However, as the tension of the bondholding the leading or first on the sheet is released, the edges resume their generally coplanar, abutting relationship and grasp a projecting sheet therebetween. This feature is important in preventing the sheet from falling back into the box. Thus with interfolded sheets, or similar arrangements for providing sequential feeding of the tissues, the succeeding sheet is always held in position for use in partially projecting relation to the carton. This is particularly advantageous when a relatively deep carton is employed and it would otherwise be ditficult to reach a sheet near the bottom of the carton without tearing the carton.

It is also important to note that the curving or deviating path of the line forming the dispensing opening 30 is effective in producing a curve in the tissue sheets as they are withdrawn and left projecting from the carton. The curvature thus provided for the limp tissue sheet .provides sulficient rigidity for the sheet to cause it to assume a generally, normally extended relation to the box, as seen in Figure 2. Thus the sheet is maintained readily accessible at all times and does not tend to lay across the top of the box, as is the natural tendency of the limp sheets ordinarily used for cleansing tissues and the like.

Then too, the disposition of the end cuts 32 and 32a is particularly effective in preventing tearing of the carton during use. In the formation of cartons of the type generally used to contain cleansing tissues and the like, it is customary to have the fibers in the paperboard extending transversely of the length of the box, otherwise the carton will'not have a well defined shape and be sufiiciently rigid This necessary arrangement of the fibers, however, makes the paperboard relatively weak in the direction of the fibers. Consequently, there is a tendency for'the cartonto tear alongthe direction of the fibers, when the carton is opened and/or during use of the carton as a tissue dispenser. The greatest source of difiiculty in this respect is at the :ends of'the dispensing opening, where there frequently occurs a transverse tearing of the paperboard carton This tendency to tear is virtually eliminated in'the illustrated opening by the provision of the endcuts 32 and 32a which, partially through their permitting more flexing of the carton top 20 and partially through their disposition in the end panels 26 transversely of the fiber direction, are most effective in confiningfthe carton opening to the line defined by thefcut 30, and preventing any tearing of the carton top. It should also be noted that it has been found advantageous to avoid scoring or pre-creasing the carton blank in the path of the end cuts 32 and 32a.

In the formation of a carton from the blank shown in Fig. 4, the tabs 34, which extend from opposite ends of the side walls 22 and 24, have their upper edges immediately beneath the end folds 36 (Figs. 1 and 2) of the carton top 20. Consequently, these tab edges provide a support or bearing along the end fold lines 36 and prevent much of the downward pressure which may be exerted on the carton top 20 from being directed along the dispensing opening to the end panels 26. This feature, in conjunction with the flexibility afforded 'by the end cuts 32 and 32a, and the disposition of the latter transversely of the fiber direction, helps toupreserve the carton intact through the opening of the carton and the subsequent repeated usage of the carton as a tissue dispenser. 'A more detailed description of this feature will be found in my copending application, Serial No. 532,481 filed September 6, 1955. s

fications might readily be made to secure the advantages of the invention without departing from the principles thereof. It should also be understood that the top pane referred to in the disclosure is the panel from which the tissue is dispensed and, therefore, may be what might otherwise be considered a bottom, side or end panel in a particular arrangement. tain advantages are gained by providing a linear cut for the dispensing opening that is perforated, another form of partial severance or a complete cut may also be used, the term linear cut being considere generic to any form of partial severance and to a complete cut, whether curving or straight.

It will be apparent that many other forms of dispensing openings may readily be made which incorporate one or more of the features discussed with respect to the illustrated embodiment, without departing from the principles of this invention.

I claim:

1. In combination with a stack of sheets which are interfolded and bonded at their edges to provide sequential feeding of each of the sheets from the stack in response to movement of the immediately overlying sheet away from the stack, a dispensing carton comprising means defining the walls of a generally rectangularlyshaped, paperboard box having top, bottom, side and end panels, the dimensions of the interior of the box being substantially the same as the dimensions of the interfolded stack of sheets, and means defining a dispensing opening in said top panel comprising a linear cut extending lengthwise substantially centrally and entirely across the top panel and including a long substantially straight portion and a pair of oppositely curving end portions extending generally transversely of said top panel a major portion of the distance from the center to the edge of the top panel and defining a pair of fingers disposed in spaced relation along said cut and extending in opposite directions, whereby the opening of said linear cut affords flexing of said top panel and provides a linear dispensing opening having the opposite edges thereof normally in substantial engagement with each other, so that when the leading one of said sheets is pulled through said linear dispensing opening one of said fingers is effective to retard the withdrawal movement of the succeeding one of said interfolded sheets, to thereby provide for relative movement between said leading sheet and .said succeeding sheet and to aid in breaking the bond holding said leading sheet in the stack, and whereby the opposite-' ly facing disposition of said fingers is adapted to alternately affect the bonds holding the leading sheets as they appear on opposite sides of the succeeding sheets.

2. In combination with a stack of sheets which are interfolded and bonded at their edges to provide sequential feeding of each of the sheets from the stack in response to movement of the immediately overlying sheet away from the stack, a dispensing carton comprising means defining the walls of a generally rectangularlyshaped, paperbooard box having top, bottom, side and end panels, the dimensions of the interior of the box being substantially the same as the dimensions of the interfolded stack of sheets, and means defining a dispensing opening in said top panel comprising a linear cut ex- Further, while cer-' tending lengthwise substantially centrally and entirely across the top panel, said linear cut including a long substantially straight portion disposed at an angle with re-,

spect to the longitudinal axis of said box and terminating in a pair of oppositely curving end portions extending generally transversely of said top panel a major portion of the distance from the center to the edge of the top panel, said curving end portions defining a pair of fingers disposed in spaced relation along said cut and extending in opposite directions, said linear cut being. arranged symn'ie y with respect to the longitudinal and transverse axes of said top panel, whereby the opening of said linear cut affords flexing of said top panel and provides a linear dispensing opening having the opposite edges thereof normally in substantial engagement with each other, so that when the leading one of said sheets is pulled through said linear dispensing opening one of said fingers is effective to retard the withdrawal movement of the suc ceeding one of said interfolded sheets, to thereby provide for relative movement between said leading sheet and said succeeding sheet and to aid in breaking the bond holding said leading sheet in the stack, and whereby the oppositely facing disposition of said fingers is adapted to alternately affect the bonds holding the leading sheets as they appear on opposite sides of the succeeding sheets.

3. In combination with a stack of sheets which are interfolded to provide sequential feeding of each of the sheets from the stack in response to'movement of the immediately overlying sheet away from the stack, a dispensing carton comprising means defining the walls of a generally rectangularly-shaped, paperboard box having top, bottom, side and end panels, the dimensions of the interior of the box being substantially the same as the dimensions of the interfolded stack of sheets, and means defining a dispensing opening in said top panel comprising a linear cut extending lengthwise substantially centrally and entirely across the top panel and including a long substantially straight portion and a pair of oppositely curving end portions extending generally transversely of said top panel a major portion of the distance from the center to the edge of the top panel and defining a pair of fingers disposed in spaced relation along said cut and extending in opposite directions, whereby the opening of said linear cut affords flexing of said top panel and provides a linear dispensing opening having the opposite edges thereof normally in substantial engagement with each other, so that when the leading one of said sheets is pulled through said linear dispensing opening one of said fingers is effective to retard the withdrawal movement of the succeeding one of said interfolded sheets, to thereby provide for relative movement between said leading sheet and said succeeding sheet and to aid in separating said leading sheet from the stack.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,935,905 Gresenz Nov. 21, 1933 2,580,982 Weiss -Jan. 1, 1952 2,672,233 Baxter Mar. 16, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 21,213 Great Britain of 1907

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1935905 *Jun 4, 1932Nov 21, 1933Int Cellucotton ProductsPackage for interfolded sheet material
US2580982 *Feb 7, 1949Jan 1, 1952Alexander C H WeissTissue sheet dispenser
US2672233 *Nov 30, 1949Mar 16, 1954Continental Can CoPackage
GB190721213A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2927714 *Sep 6, 1955Mar 8, 1960Kimberly Clark CoDispensing carton
US3868052 *Feb 26, 1973Feb 25, 1975Winston G RockefellerMoist tissue dispensing
US4535912 *Jan 7, 1980Aug 20, 1985Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPre-moistened towelette dispenser
US4562938 *Apr 2, 1984Jan 7, 1986Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySheet dispenser
US5884804 *May 20, 1996Mar 23, 1999Kimberly-Clark CorporationFolded sheet dispenser
US6230929Apr 30, 1999May 15, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Folded sheet adapter
US6585131May 31, 2001Jul 1, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible orifice for wet wipes dispenser
US6592004 *May 31, 2001Jul 15, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible orifice for wet wipes dispenser
US6766919 *May 30, 2002Jul 27, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible orifice for wet wipes dispenser
US6817484 *Oct 26, 2001Nov 16, 2004Sca Hygiene Products GmbhContainer for a stack of interfolded tissue sheets and a method for manufacturing such a container
US6905025 *Jan 16, 2003Jun 14, 2005Sca Hygiene Products GmbhContainer for a stack of interfolded tissue sheets
US6959834Mar 6, 2003Nov 1, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Windowless tissue carton
US7063245Jul 6, 2001Jun 20, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.System for dispensing plurality of wet wipes
US7070143Mar 1, 2004Jul 4, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.System for dispensing plurality of wet wipes
Classifications
U.S. Classification221/48
International ClassificationA47K10/00, A47K10/02, B65D83/08, A47K10/42, A47K10/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47K10/025, A47K10/421, B65D83/0805
European ClassificationA47K10/42B, A47K10/02B, B65D83/08B