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Publication numberUS2842921 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1958
Filing dateJun 6, 1955
Priority dateJun 6, 1955
Publication numberUS 2842921 A, US 2842921A, US-A-2842921, US2842921 A, US2842921A
InventorsRasmusson Marlin B
Original AssigneeRasmusson Marlin B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stick confection machine
US 2842921 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

\ July 15, 1958 M. B. RASMUSSON STICK CONFECTION MACHINE 9 Sheets-Sheet 1- Filed June 6, 1955 INVENTOR.

Arron [K5 July 15, 1958 M. B. RAsMussoN STICK CONFEICTION MACHINE Filed June 6, 1955 9 Shets-Sheet g 1 INVENTOR Mmw i. 675M550 Arne/vi)? M. B. RASMUSSON 2,842,921

s'rxcx CONFECTION MACHINE July 15, 1958 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 6, 1955 IZIZHE July 15, 1958 'M. B. RASMUSSON ,842,921

STICK CONFECTION MACHINE T Filed June 6, 1955 s Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG-'5 m4 F a I YINVENTOR. ,C'IG 7 Maw 5 evi/vw'saw YW (MM July 15, 1958 Filed June 6, 1955 M. B. RASMUSSON 2,842,921 STICK CONFECTION MACHINE 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG-9 INVENTOR. N424 w 51,. flesmassa/v 32b ZW 49/25 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed June 6, 1955 INVENTOR. Mil/m fiflawz/ssm W 4%;

Illlill'llv 1 M. B. RASMUSSON I STICK CONFECTION MACHINE July 15, 1958 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed June 6, 1955 ITTGP/Vihi July 15, 1958 M. B. RASMUSSON 2,842,921" I STICK CONFECTION MACHINE 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 Filed June 6, 1955 IG-2a INVENTOR. Mil/1V i. xAwMz/ssolv United ates Patento My invention relates to mechanism for handling confections on sticks so that such confections are provided with an enclosed wrapping for protecting them against contamination and for presenting them in an attractive form for sale. Stick confections usually employ acentral member which is ultimately discarded and which is normally a wooden strip or stick on which a confection such as ice cream or water ice is frozen. Often the confection includes a coating such as chocolate around the frozen material. It is customary'to manufacture such confections in machines of the sort shown in my Patent 2,535,231. During manufacturing, the sticks are held in stick holders, usually twenty-four sticks being regularly arranged in a stick holder so that they 'depend therefrom. The sticks with the stick holder are carried into juxtaposition with appropriate molds wherein the material to be frozen is placed surrounding the sticks. After freezing, there is a thawing step so that the sticks and the confections frozen thereto are withdrawn from the molds. Subsequently, the stick confections are released from the stick holder for further handling. Various sorts of stick holders are utilized but all of them embody some means for tightly grippingthe sticks in predetermined locations and all are pro-- vided with releasing handles or trips so that the gripped sticks are all simultaneously released upon appropriate actuation.

The confections, when so released, are available for further handling and for sale just as they are. In many instances it has been found desirable to place the confec tions wholly or partly into envelopes or bags for distribution and sale. More recently, it has been deemed advisable to place the confection including its stick entirely within an envelope and then to close the envelope substantially against all outside contaminants in order to maintain the stick confection in a highly sanitary and presentable fashion for sale. a It is therefore an object of my invention to provide an improved stick. confection machine.

Another object of my invention is to provide a stick confection machine having a relatively high capacity to turn out a plurality of stick confections in a given time.

Another object of the invention is to provide a stick confection machine in which the stick confections are handled gently and positively in order that damage or breakage and destruction of the stick confections during their course through the machine will be minimized.

Another object of the invention is to provide a stick confection machine in which the stick confections are put into envelopes and are sealed therein before discharge from the machine.

Another object of the invention is to provide means for facilitating inspection of the stick confections at various points of advance through the machine.

Another object of the invention is to provide a stick confection machine having means for sealing or closing the envelopes in which the stick confections are contained.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an envelope closure mechanism effective at relatively high capacities and speeds for simultaneously effecting closure of a number of stick confection envelopes.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a stick confection machine in which the sealing mechanism can be utilized or not as local circumstances require.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a stick confection machine having an effective sealing device for all of the envelopes presented to it despite irregularities therein or irregularities in the positioning of stick confections therein.

Another object of the invention is to provide a stick confection machine which is arranged. in such fashion as to be readily maintainable in a sanitary and presentable condition at all times.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a stick confection machine which works substantially automatically and with only small supervision by an observer.

Other objects of the invention, together with the foregoing, are attained in the embodiments of the device described in the accompanying description and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is for the most part a front elevation of a stick confection machine constructed in accordance with the invention, parts of the structure being broken away to show the interior arrangement and parts of adjacent mechanisms which co-operate with the stick confection machine being sufiiciently illustrated to show the environment.

Figure 2 is a cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 22 of Figure 1, with portions of the view being broken away.

Figure 3 is a cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 33 of Figure 2, various adjacent portions of the mechanism being omitted to clarify the disclosure.

Figure 4 is a horizontal cross section, the planes of which are indicated by the line 4-4 of Figure 2, parts of the structure being removed and broken away to reduce the size of the figure. 1 v

Figure 5 is a cross section similar to Figure 2 but showing the carriage in an advanced position and showing part of the bagging structure in cross section.

Figure 6 is a cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 6-6 of Figure 5.

Figure 7 is across section comparable to Figure 6 but showing the parts in a different position. 7

Figure 8 is a cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 8-8 of Figure 6.

Figure 9 is a cross section, the planes of which are indicated by the lines 99 of Figure 1.

Figure 10 is a cross section, the plane of which is shown by the line 1010 of Figure 1, with parts of the mechanism broken away to reduce the figure size.

Figure .11 is a cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 11-11 of Figure 10.

Figure 12 is a detailed cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 1212 of Figure 10.

Figure 13 is a cross section of a part of the sealing structure, the plane of section being indicated by the line 13-13 of Figure 9.

Figure 14 is a cross section in detail, the plane of which is indicated by the line 14-14 of Figure 13.

Figure 15 is a cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 15--15 of Figure 13.

Figure 16 is a cross section comparable to Figure 15 but showing a modified form of sealer jaw.

Figure 17 is a plan of the structure illustrated in Figurel6.

Figure 18 is a side elevation somewhat comparable to Figure but showing a modified form of sealer jaw actuator. I t

Figure 19 is a view similar to Figure 18 but showing the parts in a different position.

Figure 20 is a view somewhat comparable to Figure 13 and is a cross section, the plane of which is indicated by the line 2020 of Figure 18.

Figure 21 is somewhat comparable to Figure 9 and is a cross secion through the form ofsealer jaw and attendant mechanism illustrated in Figures 18, 19 and 20. In the preferred form of stick confection machine, there is preferably provided a frame 31 having suitable supports 32 on a floor 33 and including an enclosing cabinet 34 located so as to be supplied by a supply conveyor 36. rails 37 and a conveyor chain 38 having lugs 39 thereon adapted to engage a convenient part of a stick holder 41. Lugs 42 on the stick holder are slidable along the rails 38. Firmly gripped are depending sticks 43 frozen into confections 44 hanging below the stick holder.

As the conveyor chain 38 advances, the lugs 39 propel the stick holders successively into a central position on the frame 31, the lug 39 disengaging from a stick holder just as that stick holder is centrally located. In that position, the stick holder is supported on rails 46 forming part of a lowering frame 47 connected to the piston rod 48 of a double acting pneumatic chamber 49. Suitable connections extend from the chamber to a source of compressed air and are provided with appropriate controls.

When the stick holder is in the central position illustrated in Figure 1, the chamber mechanism 49 is actuated to lower the frame work 47 and all of the confections 44 are simultaneously positioned within bottomless compartments 51 formed in a horizontally reciprocable carriage 52. This is supported on appropriate rollers 53 on the frame 31. The carriage 52 has the same number of bottomless compartments as there are confections 44 and freely receives the lowered confections. In its rearmost position (Figure 2) the carriage 52 partially overlies a supporting plate 54 mounted on the frame 31 so as to engage or hold up all but the forward row of confections. While the supporting plate can extend under all the confections, if desired, it has been found suitable to terminate Included in the supply conveyor are parallel.

the support plate between the leading and next succeeding row of confections.

The stroke of the piston rod 48 issuch that in the lowermost position of the framed], the overlying confections 44 are deposited gently upon theplate 54 to avoid damage to their shape and to their coating, if any. When the confections are in their lowermost position, they are released from the stick holder 41. That is accomplished by the operation of a pneumatic chamber 56 having a plunger 57. When suitably actuated, the plunger descends against a trip 58 forming part of the standard stick holder and depresses the trip so that the stick holder jaws release all of the sticks 43 simultaneously. Subsequently, the plunger 57 is withdrawn and restored to its original position and the chamber 49 is actuated so that the rod 48 lifts the frame 47. The just discharged stick holder is then brought back into its original location in registry with the rails 38. A succeeding stick holder being adporting location for the confections 54 in the leading row, those confections when released by the trip 58 on the stick holder fall directly into a row of chutes. 61 for further handling. The first row of confections is thus advanced in the machine without the necessity of operating the carriage 5'2.i The next successive rows,,how-

ever, must be advanced in turn over the support plate 54 and discharged from the forward edge thereof to follow the first row into the chutes 61. For that purpose the carriage 52 is appropriately reciprocated from its rearmost extreme position, as shown in Figure 2, toward a forward extreme position, an intermediate location being illustrated in Figure 5.

The carriage 52 is provided with a plurality of lugs 62 projecting into the path of rotation of comparable lugs 63 on a rotating sector 64 fast on a cross shaft 66. As the shaft 66 rotates, the leading lug 63 abuts the leading lug 62 and causes the carriage 52 to advance one step whereupon the next successive lug 63 engages the next successive lug 62 and so on until the carriage is moved to its foremost position. Each degree of advance of the carriage is effective to advance a successive row of confections over the edge of the support plate 52 to discharge the corresponding row of confections into the chutes 61. When the carriage has arrived at its forward extreme position, a roller 67 on an arm 68 fast on the shaft 66 engages a depending leg 69 on the carriage 52 and restores the carriage to-its rearmost position ready for a subsequent-cycle.

The synchronization of this portion of the machine is assured by appropriate mechanism. A common drive motor 71 is mountedon the frame 31 within the cabinet 34 and is connected by various drive chains to the interrelated parts. For example, as shown in Figure l, the motor is connected by a chain 72' to a cross shaft 73 itself joined by a chain 74 to an angle drive 76 connected to the conveyor 36 so that the lugs 39 are appropriately synchronized and deliver the stick holders in proper timed sequence. Also driven from the shaft 73 but at the opposite end thereof is a chain 77 (Figures 2 and 10) which rotates the shaft 66. In this fashion, the advance and retreat of the carriage 52 are synchronized with the operation of the conveyor 36.

When the carriage 52 returns to its rearmost position or substantially thereto, it is effective to engage a switch lever 78 actuating a switch 79-. This is a safety interlock switchconnected in series with switches 81 and 82 (Figure 3) respectively controlling the electro-magnetically actuated. valves (not shown) for the cylinder 49 and for the chamber 56. The switch 81 is actuated by a lever 83 in the path of a sector 84 fixed on the shaft 66 and is actuated slightly before the engagement of the leading lug63 with theleading lug 62. Shortly after the chamber 49 has been actuated fully to lower the frame 47, a lug 86 at an appropriate location on the sector 84 and rotatable also with the shaft 66 engages a lever 87 controlling the operation of the switch 82. Thus, when the chamber 49 is fully extended and the elevator frame 47 is in its lowermost position, the chamber 56 is actuated to release the stick holder. That actuation is momentary and occurs only so long as it takes the lug 86 to rotate over the spring returned lever-87. Similarly, the passage of the sector 84 over the lever 83 reverses the switch 81 so that the effect of the chamber 49 is reversed and the elevator frame 47 is lifted into its original position.

As so far described, therefore, there is an automatic mechanism for transferring the confections from a stick holder into a plurality of side by side chutes 61 with groups of the confections and their contained sticks entering the chutes 61 in a succession or series of rows.

Since all of the confections in a row are similarly treated as they fall gravitationally through their enclosing chutes 61, a description of one of them applies equally to the others. A dropping confection 44 (Figure 5) is confined by the chute 61 but falls freely into a "bagging mechanism. In this location, there is provided a supply 91 of envelopes or bags usually of a transparent or semitransparent wax paper material or plastic or glassine." Each bag is generally rectangular in shape and is expansibleto enclose thethickuess, and width of the confection. Preferably each bag is also of a suitable length to enclose not only the edible portion of the confection but also the stick portion 43 as well. The closure margins of the envelope can 'be brought into abutment with each other beyond the end of the enclosed stick 43 and are usually substantially straight or rectilinear and are provided in most cases with some sort of sealing material, such as wax or a thermo-plastic or other adhesive effective when pressed into contact and sometimes of a material specially activated by an increased temperature. The nature and construction of the particular envelope varies markedly with custom and demand in different parts of the countryand from time to time and depending upon the nature and style of the stick confection to be enclosed, but'the mechanism is well adapted for use with all ofthe usual commercial envelopes or bags 91.

These are preferably stacked or supported on curved rails 92 carried by cross bars 93 supported on the frame 31' of the machine and are urged toward a forward position by a traveller including a heavy wheel 94 adapted to ride on and roll down-the inclined rails 92. The traveller includes a a frame 96 having a trailing stabilizing portion 97 in engagement with the rails 92 and a forward presser plate 98 in abutment with the rearmost bag of the supply 91. The traveller provides a constant tendency to urge the envelopes 91 forward.

The group of envelopes rests against a nozzle 99 immediately alongside the adjacent chute 61 and extending from an air manifold 101. Supplying the manifold is a blower 102 (Figure 1) driven by a suitable electric motor 103 and furnishing a blast of air to the various nozzles 99. The effect of the air blast is to blow open the foremost bag 104 of the supply 91, as shown in Figure 5, so that the open envelope underlies the adjacent chute 61. As

the confection 44 falls through the chute, it enters into the opened envelope 104.

To assist in opening the envelope and to make sure that it is open enough to receive the confection 44 easily,

each chute 61 at its lower opening is provided with a pair of spring returned fingers 106. These lie in the path of the falling confection and are deflected, as shown in Figure 7, about their support rods 107 to enter readily into a partially opened envelope and to expand it and hold it in substantially a rectangular cross section shape. The confection 44 then falls exactly into the envelope 104. As it passes them, the fingers 106 are returned to their position, as shown in Figure 6, for subsequent actuation.

The impact of the falling confection 44 within the envelope 104 and the location of the confection then with respect to the rails 92 is such as to dislodge the enveloped confection from the forward end of the rails onto a retainer bar 108 (Figure 5). The support or retainer bar 108 is eccentric with respect to a square shaft 109 having journals mounted in the framework of the machine for rotation. In its upper position the support bar underlies all of therow of confections which have just been bagged.

The end of the square shaft 109 beyond its journals in the frame of the machine carries a gear wheel'lll (Figures 10, 11 and 12). A rack 1 12 engages the gear 111 and is heldin operating position by an idler 113. The rack is at the end of a reciprocating rod 114 returned by a spring 116 and adjustably engaging a tappet 117 guided in a block 118 secured to the frame 31 of the machine. A roller 119 at the other end of the rod 114 runs on a duplex cam 121 having lobes 122 thereon in appropriate locations. The cam is fast on the shaft 73 and so is driven synchronously with'the remaining part of the structure.

The location of the lobes 122 is such that after the retainer bar 108' has received a row of, enveloped stick confections inits position shown in full lines in Figures 5 and 9, it is rotated for substantially a quarter of a 6 turn into the dotted line position shown in Figure 9 and thus releases the previously supported enveloped confections so that they fall by gravity onto a transfer belt 123 (Figures 9 and 10). The transfer belt, as shown in Fig- 1 ure 9, receives the enveloped stick confections in fiat position and permits ready inspection of the product at that point.

In the event an imperfect confection has been received in the machine or in the event an imperfect bag is discharged or if the confection is not properly enveloped, those defects can readily be observed while the confections are on the transfer belt 123 and any defective ones can readily be removed by an operator. Furthermore, if the envelopes are not to be fully closed but are commercial in their open form, the confections can be removed from the machine by an extension of the transfer belt 123 without any further operation.

In the preferred instance, there is provided a mechanism for closing the filled envelopes tightly against contamination. For that reason, the frame 31 is extended to support a sealing mechanism, generally designated 126 and especially illustrated in Figures 9, 10, 13, 14 and 15. The transfer belt 123 is preferably driven by chains 127 and 128 from the shaft 73 and is effective to advance the enveloped confections and discharge them over its leading portion onto an inclined plate 129 arranged in close juxtaposition to a stop 131, the plate and stop defining a V.

The plate 129 and the stop 131 together abut two sides at least of the enveloped confection in supporting relationship thereto and not only support the confection but locate it in such fashion that the envelope closure margins are situated between a pair of jaws 132 and 133, the enveloped confection having passed completely between such jaws in their open position. The framework 31 of the machine, as shown in Figure 14, serves as a support for a cross bar 134 to the leading or upper edge of which the jaw 133 is appropriately secured. This jaw preferably has a serrated forward surface 136 and is hollow and of metal to receive an electric heating element 137 connected by appropriate conductors to a source of electricity so that heated.

In some instances wherein the envelopes are such as to be sealed without heat, the circuit to the heater 137 can I 'be open or the heater itself can be entirely eliminated but for most instances, it is desired to have the heater because heat sealing is deemed preferable. Also, the serrated edges 136 can be sharp enough to perforate the envelope material somewhat to afford an interlocking action of the closure margins of the envelope, although in some instances this is not desired and merely a corrugated effect on the envelope is adequate. In any event, the serrations 136 when the jaws are closed are opposite a rubber face strip 138 on the upper or forward jaw 132. Preferably, the location of the lower jaw 133 is approximately tangent to the curvature of the transfer belt '123 and is approximately co-planar with the support plate 129 so that an enveloped confection lying against the stop 131 on the plate 129 has its closure margins lying closely adjacent the serrations 136.

In order to effectuate the closure and seal, the upper jaw 132 is moved into a close relationship with the lower jaw 133- To that end, the upper jaw 132 is connected as part of a reciprocating frame 141 having side pieces slidably engaging rails 142 (Figure 14) in the frame 31 and also having a cross bar 143. The cross bar is fas-. tened to the cylinder 144 of a double acting pneumatically ,expansible chamber 146 suitably. supplied at its opposite ends with actuating air and enclosing a piston 147 and piston rod 148 joined firmly to the bar 134, When the chamber is actuated in one direction the jaws are moved apart, as shown in all of the figures whereas when the chamber is actuated in the opposite direction, the

the serrated surface 136 is thoroughly movable frame 141 is lowered so that the movable upper jaw 132 is closely approached to the lower jaw.

The pressure exerted between the jaws upon the engaged envelopes is dependent upon the air pressure utilized in the cylinder 144. In this way, a careful regulation of pressure ensures that just the desired amount of pressure is exerted upon the closure margins of the envelopes to effectuate a proper closure. In the event there are irregularities, such as a partially projecting stick 43 or a fragment of coating material or the like within the closure margins of the envelope, the rubber strip 138 yields sufliciently so that the envelope is appropriately sealed without damage to the stick confection or to the machine.

While the form of jaws shown particularly in Figure 15 is acceptable for most uses, an alternative form, as shown in Figures 16 and 17, is sometimes utilized. In that instance, the upper jaw 151 is substantially unaltered, being provided with a rubber face 152, although the jaw is somewhat wider than before. The lower jaw 153 is preferably comprised of what amounts to a helicallythreaded pair of rods 154 and 156 each of which is hollow to receive electric heaters 157 and each of which is rotatably clamped at its ends by a pinch bolt 158 in the frame bar 134. With this arrangement the threads on the rods 156 and 157 can be made quite sharp in order to pierce or perforate the envelope margins mechanically. The material of the envelopes, however, eventually dulls the sharp threads. In that instance the pinch bolts 158 can be slightly rotated to expose a new sharp surface. When the entire periphery of the rods has become dull, they can be removed and replaced. This arrangement is effective to provide two rows of close mechanical interlocks and of heat sealing of the envelopes if the material of the envelopes or the local requirements make that advisable.

With either sort ofjaw, the motion of the actuating chamber 146 is controlled by an air valve 159 (Figure mounted on the framework of the machine. The valve is suitably supplied with air and is connected to the opposite ends of the cylinder 144. The valve is actuated by a roller lever 161 which extends into the path of duplex cams 162 projecting from the face of the cam disc 121 on the shaft 73 so that at an appropriate point in the synchronized operation of the machine, and after the enveloped confections are positioned against the stop 131 and are supported on the plate 129, the previously open jaws areclosed. The cams 162 operate in proper timed sequence on the valve 159 which effectively actuates the chamber 146. The extent of each of the cams 162 is such that after the jaws 132 and 133 have been held together for an appropriate length of time to effectuate the mechanical interlocking and the heat sealing of the envelope closure margins, the valve 159 is reversed. This reverses the pressure'of the chamber 146 and the jaws 132 and 133 are restored to their open position for the subsequent reception of a succeeding series or row of enveloped confections derived from the transfer belt 123.

After the jaws 132 and 133 return from their closed to their open position, the then sealed and enveloped confections are advanced. For that reason, the plate 129 (Figure 9) adjacent its upper end is mounted on a cross shaft 163 journaled in the frame 31 and at its lower end is engaged by the piston 164 of a pneumatically expansible chamber 166. A valve 167 controls the operation of the chamber 166 and has a latch-lever actuator 168 in the path of a cam 169 mounted on the movable frame 143. As the chamber 146 is actuated to open or spread the jaws 132 and 133 after the sealing of the envelopes, the cam 169 rides over the latch-lever 168 and momentarily actuates the valve 167 so that chamber 166 is expanded and rotates the support plate 129 about the axis of the cross shaft 163 and lifts the plate 129 sothat the=confections thereon can slide over the upper end of the abutting plate or stop plate 131. The closure of the valve 167 is only momentary and the plate 129 returns by gravity to its former position and the cam 169 passes back over the latch-lever 168 without causing an actuation on the return movement.

The confections which are gravitationally discharged from the plate 129 by sliding over the stop plate 131 fall onto a discharge belt 171 for further disposition, for example, for travel to a packaging station. Conveniently, the belt 171 is driven by a chain 172 in synchronism with the belt 123.

There is thus provided a stick confection machine for completely and automatically processing a stick confection from a stick holder through an enveloping station into and through a closure and heat sealing station and finally to discharge for packaging or other disposition.

In some instances, it is preferred that the closure and heat sealing jaws be mechanically rather than pneumatically operated. A construction for such purposes is shown in Figures 18 to 21, inclusive. In this instance, the enveloped confections released by the support bar 108 instead of falling onto a transfer belt 123, fall between an upper jaw 176' and a lower jaw 177 onto a support plate 178 and against a stop bar 179, the support plate and the stop bar defining a V. The function of the plate 178 is identical in many respects to that of the plate 129 while the function of the stop bar 179 is in many respects identical to that of the stop 131. Each of the jaws 176 and 177 is hollow and is provided with a heater 181. The upper jaw 176 is mounted on a cross bar 182 slidable in a slot 183 in the frame 31 and is connected at its opposite ends with end bars 184 through a spring cushion mechanism 185. The end bars 184 abut against pairs of springs 186, effective to urge the jaws 176 away from the jaw 177.

The end bars 184 are connected to cam straps 187 carrying rollers 188 riding on cams 189 on the shaft 73. Lobes 191 on the cams 189 are effective in certain parts of the rotational cycle of the shaft 73 to bear against the rollers 188 and to move the jaw 176 against the urgency of the springs 186 toward the other jaw 177. Simultaneously, the other lobes 191 on the cam 189 are also effective against rollers 192 on cam followers 193 joined to a cross bar 194 carrying the jaw 177 to dis place that jaw toward the jaw 176. The motion of the side members 193 is resisted by the same springs 186 that opposed the approaching motion of the jaw 176. This is arranged by brackets 196 projecting from the side members 193 and engaging. the ends of the springs 186. In this fashion, there is provided a synchronized mechanical arrangement for propelling the jaws 176 and 177 toward and away from each other with a cushioned motion, the springs being effective to regulate the pressure and to compensate for irregularities in the substantially meeting position of the jaws 176 and 177.

Since the support plate 178 (Figure 21) is stationary, the stop member 179 is cyclically made effective to release the confections just after the envelopes have been sealed by the meeting of the jaws. About the time the jaws recede sufiiciently, a cam 197 (Figures 18 and 19) having lobes 198 thereon is effective on a follower 199 to translate the follower in a block 201 on the frame 31. The follower, when displaced, is effective to compress a return spring 202 bearing against a bracket 203 and to reciprocate a rack 204 at its end. This rack is in engagement with a pinion 206 and is held in position by a roller 207. The pinion 206 is at the journaled end of a shaft 208 bearing in the frame 31 and between its ends having a square portion209 carrying the stop plate 179. When the cam lobe 198 displaces the rack 204, the plate 179 is moved from its full line position in Figure 21 into its dotted line position in that figure and permits the sealed confections to fall by sliding along the-plate-178 and into a resting position on a discharge belt 211 suitably'driven to carry the confections to an appropriate point for further handling.

In this form of the invention, also, there is provided a means for eifectuating a mechanical closure, and if desired, a heat seal of the closure margins of the envelope within which the stick confection is enclosed.

What is claimed is:

1. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, means on said frame for supporting a stick holder, means for advancing a stick holder onto said supporting means, means for lowering said supporting means and said stick holder into releasing position, means for releasing stick confections from said holder, a compartmental bottomless carriage mounted on said frame for movement between two extreme positions, one of said positions being in the path of said released stick confections, a support plate fixed on said frame and underlying said carriage in stick confection supporting relationship but only in said one position of said carriage, a plurality of upright chutes on said frame and underlying said carriage in a location between said extreme positions for receiving stick confections dropped from said plate during the movement of said carriage thereover, means on said frame for enclosing each of said stick confections dropping through said chutes in an envelope having adjacent closure margins disposed beyond the end of the stick in said confection, means on said frame for temporarily arresting said dropping enveloped stick confections by engagement with the confection portion thereof, means on said frame for heating and pressing together said closure margins of said arrested envelope, and means on said frame for driving in synchronism said lowering means and said releasing means and said carriage and said arresting means and said heating and pressing means.

2. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, means on said frame for dropping a stick confection, means on said frame for enclosing said dropping stick confection in an envelope having adjacent closure margins, means on said frame for arresting said enveloped dropping stick confection in an inclined position including an inclined bottom support and an inclined side support, and means on said frame moving parallel to said bottom support for heating and pressing together said closure margins.

3. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, means on said frame for introducing a stick confection into an envelope having adjacent closure margins, means for dropping said enveloped stick confection to a closure station, means for arresting the drop of said enveloped stick confection at said station, means at said station for heating and pressing together and then releasing said closure margins While said stick confection is arrested, and means for further dropping said enveloped stick confection after said closure margins are released.

4. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, a pair of mutually approachable heated jaws on said frame, means for moving said jaws toward and away from each other on an inclined path, means on said frame for introducing a stick confection into an envelope h'aving adjacent closure margins, means for dropping said enveloped stick confection between said jaws when said jaws are away from each other, means for arresting said enveloped stick confection in an inclined position with said adjacent closure margins inclined between said jaws, and means for dropping said enveloped stick confection out of said inclined position as said jaws are moving away from each other.

5. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, means on said frame including an inclined bottom and an inclined side portion forming an inclined support for a stick confection in an envelope having adjacent closure margins projecting beyond said support, a pair of mutually approachable heated jaws on said frame, means for moving said jaws toward each other and against said project- 10 ing margins and also away from each other, and means on said frame for removing said inclined bottom portion to drop said enveloped stick confection from said support.

6. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, means on said frame abutting and supporting twosides of a stick confection in an envelope having adjacent closure margins, a pair of heated jaws, means mounting said jaws on said frame for movement against and away from said closure margins, and means on said frame for moving at least one of said abutting means out of supporting relationship with said enveloped stick confection during movement of said jaws away from said closure margins.

7. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, means for supporting an open flexible bag on said frame, said bag having scalable edges surrounding the open portion thereof, means on said frame for dropping a stick confection into said open bag with the stick within said bag and simultaneously dislodging said bag from said supporting means to drop with said stick confection, means on said frame for engaging the bottom and an adjacent side of said bag to support the stick confection therein in an inclined arrested position, means engaging said ba'g while in said position for sealing said scalable edges and then disengaging said bag, and means for removing one of said engaging means from engagement with said stick confection after said edes are sealed.

8. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, means for supporting an open flexible bag on said frame, said bag having scalable edges surrounding the open portion thereof, means on said frame for dropping a stick confection into said bag and dislodging said bag to drop farther with said stick confection therein, means for stopping said bag with said stick confection therein in a predetermined position including members bearing the weight of the bottom and an adjacent side of said stick confection, means momentarily engaging said open portion of said bag in said predetermined position for sealing said bag, and means for shifting one of said members out of weight bearing position after the momentary operation of said sealing means.

9. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, a pair of supporting members on said frame both arranged in weight supporting positions, means for dropping onto said supporting members a bag containing a stick confection and having scalable edges, means on said frame and moving substantially parallel with one of said supporting members for sealing said edges by momentary engagement therewith, and means effective after said momentary engagement for moving said one of said supporting members out of said weight supporting position.

10. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, a pair of supporting members on said frame arranged in a V to support the bottom and one side of a bag containing a stick confection, means for dropping a bag containing a stick confection to lodge in said V of said supporting members, means for sealing said bag while lodged in said V, and means for moving one of said supporting members to drop therefrom said sealed bag containing said stick confection.

11. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, a bottom support and a side support arranged in a V on said frame, means for releasing a plurality of bags containing stick confections to drop in substantially parallel paths to lodge in side by side positions supported on the bottom and one side by said bottom support and said side support, means for simultaneously sealing all of said bags while so lodged, and means for moving one of said supports to drop therefrom all of said sealed bags containing stick confections.

12. A stick confection machine comprising a frame, a bottom support and a side support arranged in a V on said frame, means for releasing at approximately the same time a plurality of bags containing stick confections References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Pease June 30, 1925 Harmon Nov. 8, 1938 Cordrey et a1. May 2, 1939 Canales Oct. 18, 1955

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US2156561 *Feb 10, 1938May 2, 1939Liquid Carbonic CorpMethod and apparatus for packaging
US2721015 *May 20, 1950Oct 18, 1955Dixon Engineering CompanyArticle bagging machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3182611 *Apr 8, 1963May 11, 1965Irving RubensteinApparatus for making and packaging ice cream sandwiches
US3206913 *Aug 14, 1962Sep 21, 1965Albert H GinsburgBag filling machine
US3424290 *Jan 28, 1966Jan 28, 1969Fmc CorpBagging apparatus
US3468100 *Sep 24, 1965Sep 23, 1969Atlantic CoBagging machine
US3889449 *Sep 10, 1973Jun 17, 1975Membrino HerculesOpening, filling and sealing device for thermoplastic bags
US6742321Sep 30, 2002Jun 1, 2004Gates Automation, Inc.Flange alignment and grasping assembly for bag handling apparatus
US6823654 *May 3, 2002Nov 30, 2004Gates Automation, Inc.Bag filling and sealing machine and method for handling bags
US6868655Apr 22, 2003Mar 22, 2005Gates Automation, Inc.Bag handling machine
US6886308Feb 21, 2003May 3, 2005Gates Automation, Inc.Bag holder for bag handling machine
US20030200729 *Apr 22, 2003Oct 30, 2003Gates George C.Bag filling and sealing machine and method for handling bags
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/572, 53/284.7, 53/374.8
International ClassificationA23G9/26, A23G9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA23G9/26
European ClassificationA23G9/26