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Publication numberUS2844964 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1958
Filing dateDec 6, 1952
Priority dateDec 6, 1952
Publication numberUS 2844964 A, US 2844964A, US-A-2844964, US2844964 A, US2844964A
InventorsGuibert Francis W
Original AssigneeGuibert Francis W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid sampler
US 2844964 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 29, 1958 F. w. GUIBERT 2,844,964.

LIQUID SAMPLER Filed Dec. 6, 11952 3 Sheets-Sheetl T 5R. Q QM Q mm E MV 5w. a .Q Mw \|l\\ M uw l wm m NE July 29,1958 F. GUIBERT f '2,844,964'

LIQUID SAMPLER Filed Dec. 6, 1952 's sheets-smet 2.

\ TMW Gij" E? if Q INVENoR.

FuNc/ s a @wafer 7 @Trae/viv' United States Patent() LIQUID SAMPLER Francis W. Guibert, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application December 6, 1952, Serial No. 324,481

6 Claims. (Cl. 73-422) This invention relates to a device for collecting samples of liquids, such as Water and hydrocarbon mixtures owing in a conduit. The samples so collected are then made the subject of laboratory analysis.

The desirability of a continuous liquid sampler has been recognized, since intermittent sampling may not be reliable by virtue of the fact that the characteristics of fluid at a given point in a conduit are not unchanging with time. Intermittent sampling is nevertheless resorted to by virtue of certain problems arising in connection with continuous sampling. Continuous sampling has heretofore required a substantial quantity of sampled fluid and consequent waste and inconvenience unless provisions for exceedingly small flow are made.

Heretofore, an exceedingly small ow aperture introduced vsuch problems as different rates of flow of the constituent'materials through theaperturegiving a completely inaccurate sample, and the presence of colloidal foamsV on'the exhaust side of the aperture tending to block flow or to 'cause unsteady liow characteristics.

It is an object of the present invention to' provide a rr' j ice Itis another object of this invention to provide a device of this character that is simple and reliable, and easily disassembled for purposes of maintenance.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of several embodiments of the invention. For this purpose, there are shown a few forms in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. These forms will now Vbe described in detail, illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that this deh tailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense,

sampler incorporating an exceedingly small'ow aperture v in whichxthe constituent materials of the uid being sampled pass the aperture atthe same rate,-and in which the colloidal foam is dispersed. Accordingly, extremely small quantities of liquids can be continuously, regularly and iaccurately collected inthe form of drops. It is another'objec't of the present invention to provide a device iof this character in which the effective size of the flowtaperture'may be varied, in order to control the` rate of collection and to compensate for diierent pressure andother characteristicsV of the uid being sampled.

To accomplish these objects, a movable valve member, generally in the form of a needle valve, cooperates with a flow aperture. In some forms of the present invention, aV knife-edge aperture is provided, anda needle valve' either rotatable or reciprocable. In other forms of the presentinvention, a nozzle type aperture is provided,1anda needle valve either rotatable or reciprocable, the nozzle type being particularly desirablein connection with extremely'high pressures.'v Y

It is contemplated that, forV purposes of accuracy, the sampler. be located immediately downstream of a metering device. Without the agitatingactionof such meter, some constituent ymaterials might tend `to How to the outside of the pipe to the partial exclusion of other constituents. Byrso locating the sampler, it is ensured that thesample withdrawn is a proportional representation of therentire ilow, such ow through the pipe being homogeneous.

It-is another object of this invention to provide a device of 'this character that serves to agitate the liquid at the inlet to the ow laperture in order that an accurate sampleV be made independently of another agitating device.V YFor this purpose, the rotatable valvemernber carries iinpeller blades, alsov serving as a source of motion for ithe valve member.

since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional View of a uid sampler incorporating the present invention;

Fig. la is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the device illustrated in Fig. 1;

Figs. 2 and 3 are enlarged fragmentary sectional views illustrating modied forms of a portion of the apparatus embodying the present invention;

Figs. 4 and 5 are longitudinal sectional views illustrating other forms, respectively, of the present invention; and

Fig. 6 is a sectional view, taken along the plane indicated by line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

A small representative portion of the fluid owing 11 for accommodating an end 12dof a body member 12.l

The end 12a of the body member 12 is correspondingly threaded, and an O-ring 34 accommodated inappropriate grooves' of the pipe 10 andbody 12maintains a` proper sealing`relationship to prevent undesired flow of Huid through the aperture 11.

The body member 12 is generally of hollow or tubular configuration, forming an interior chamber or space 13 int-o which a portion of the Huid of the pipe 10 is bypassed. For metering the iluid into the chamber 13, a small orice 14 (see, also, Fig. la) forms the only communication between the interior of the pipe line -10 and the chamber 13 of the body. 'Ihis orifice is formed in a valve seat `insert 15 that is of suitable wear resistant material. A conical surface 15a (Fig. 1a) on the inner side of the insert 15 intersects the outer plane surface of the insert 15 to provide a knife edge forming the orice 14. An enlarged recess 16 in theV end 12a of the body 12 thati is exposed to the interior of the pipe line`10, and surrounding the converging end 13a ofl the chamber 13, accommodates the insert 15, as by force-fitting. The conical surface 15a'(Fig. la) of the insert 15 forms a smooth continuation of the converging end 13a of the chamber 13.

A collection jar 17 receives the iluid from the chamber 13. For this purpose, a tubular outlet forming member 18 communicates with the chamber 13 and the jar 17. The outlet memberV 18 is secured by the aid of threaded engagement with a lateral aperture 19 of the body 12 that is spaced from the inlet orifice 14. The jar 17 is detachably coupled to the bodyby the aid of a jar holding cap 20. This cap 20 has a depending flange 21 provided with interior threads 22 for receiving the corresponding threads 23 at the upper opening of the jar 17. The jar Vcap20 is forced-fitted to the conduit member through the cover member 20 and is accommodated in a bossed aperture 24 thereof. A vent 56 provides suitable exhaust to the atmosphere for maintaining `proper pressure differential to permit fiow through the body 12 and into the jar 17.

In order to provide a ow through the inlet orifice 14 of the order of a few drops per minute, the clearance at the orifice is quite small, such as about a thousandth of an inch, more or less. Such small flow is necessary in order that continuous sampling be practical, obviating waste and inconvenience in handling.

lf the fiuid being sampled be a mixture-of water and oil, such as may be obtained directly from a Well, the large pressure reduction due to the slight clearance at the orifice 14 causes the constituent elements of the fluid to break up into extremely small globules. A stiff foam or colloid is thus formed on the inside of the orifice 14. Such foam extends over and near the edges of the orifice 14 and, through forces arising largely through surface tension and adhesion, resistance to flow through the orifice occurs. If the fiow is not almost entirely prevented by the foam, the vagaries in the formation thereof introduce substantial variations in the rates of flow through the orifice 14; incorrect sampling may therefore result. The tendency of such foam to oppose flow through the orifice 14 is especially great in connection with oils of substantial viscosity.

In order that sampling at a continuously uniform rate be achieved without increasing the orifice size, means are provided for preventing the colloid or foam from retarding uniform ow through the orifice. For this purpose, an agitator member 2S ending in a needle is provided that serves to break up and disperse the foam. The needle end of the agitator 25 extends into the closes the orifice 14 when the sampler is not used. When the sampler is used, the needle is slightly withdrawn. The annular clearance between the needle and the orifice permits flow through the sampler. The extent of withdrawal of the needle determines the clearance, and hence regulates the iiow through the sampler. The agitator member 25 is of elongate form, and is rotatably supported by a sleeve 26.

For this purpose, the member 25 extends through a longitudinal aperture 27 of the sleeve 26. Ball bearing structures 28 and 29 are carried internally of the sleeve aperture 27 and also accommodate reduced portions of the needle member 25. Split spring snap rings 30 and 31 that are accommodated in appropriate recesses of the sleeve 26 cooperate with shoulders 32 and 33 of the member 25 properly to retain the member 25 and bearings 28 and 29 in definite longitudinal positions with respect-to the sleeve 26.

The sleeve 26 is, in turn, guidingly received in the right-hand end of the chamber 13, as viewed in Fig. 1. For this purpose, the recess forming the chamber 13 opens at the end 12b of the body 12 remote from the inlet end 12a. The sleeve carries external threads 35 in engagement with internal threads 36 of the valve body 12.

The end of the agitator 25 is tapered to serve additionally as a valve member controlling the rate of flow through the orifice `14. Such control is achieved by adjusting the position of the sleeve 26 on the body, made possible by the threaded engagement between the sleeve 26 and the valve body 12. In order to facilitate this adjustment, a knurled adjusting knob 37 is carried at that end of the sleeve 26 that projects rearwardly of the body 12. The knob 37 forms a cup-shaped recess 38 receiving the end of the sleeve 26. The valve member 25 extends with substantial clearance through a central aperture 39 of the knob 37. The knob 37 and sleeve 26 are secured against relative rotation by the aid of a set screw 40.

Adjustment of the position of the sleeve 26 in the chamber 13 by the aid ofthe knob 37 serves to adjust the clearance between the pointed end ofthe valve member 25 and the orice 14. Accordingly, by these means, the effective fiow area of the orifice, and hence the rate of flow, is controlled.

Rotation of the valve member 25 causes the colloidal foam at the inside of the orifice 14 to be broken and dispersed so that uniform and continuous fiow can be achieved.

For rotating the valve member 25, a coupling member 41 is provided that serves to connect the end of the member 25 to a exible shaft 42. This shaft 42 may be driven by being suitably connected to a motor or the like. The connector 41 at one end has an aperture 43 receiving the end of the member 25. A knob 44, extending over the end of the connector 41, mounts a set screw 45 engaging the end of the valve member 25 to prevent relative rotation thereof with respect to the connector 41. A sleeve 49 and sleeve cap 50 serve to restrain the shaft 42 against separation from the connector 41, all in a conventional manner.

A slinger 54 operates further to urge the liquid in the chamber 13 radially outwardly, preventing flow along the rotatable member 25, and helping to clear chamber 13 through the exhaust or outlet member 18.

Preferably, the sampler is inserted in that portion of the pipe line 10 that is immediately downstream of a meter or the like. Accordingly, the agitation of the liquid thereby caused ensures a uniform consistency throughout the area of the pipe line 10. The portion of the liquid passing through the orifice 14 is thus accurately representative of the entire body of fluid passing through the pipe line 10.

Continuous ow is ensured through the small orifice 14 by the adjustment and aid of the cyclic motion of the rotary member 25 dispersing the foam or colloid. The knife-edge form of the orice 14 ensures uniform rates of ow therethrough of the constituent elements of the fluid. Samples may thereby be Vcollected uniformly and accurately throughout a substantial period of operation. The jar 17, while of small size, has a capacity sufficient, with respect to this small flow, to collect the fluid throughout a period of the order of twenty-four hours.

Fig. 2 illustrates a slightly varied form of an agitator member 60 and inlet passage forming insert 61. The insert 61 has a through aperture 62, which diverges in the direction of ow for only a portion of the length of the aperture. The member 60has a configuration corresponding to that of the aperture 62, the valve member 60 having a substantially frusto-conical portion 63 thereof diverging from a cylindrical end portion, the frusto-conical portion forming a surface opposed to the diverging portion of the inlet passageway 62. Longitudinal adjustment of the valve member 60 causes these opposed surfaces to move toward or away from each other to alter the rate of flow. The valve member 60 is mounted in a manner identical to that disclosed in the form illustrated in Fig. 1, the rotation of the valve member 60 serving to ensure proper and uniform flow through the inlet passage 62.

The form illustrated in Fig. 3 may be particularly useful where extremely high pressures are encountered. The present form is similar to, but the reverse of, that disclosed in Fig. 2. In this instance, however, a valve member 70 and an inlet passage forming insert 71 have opposed tapered surfaces 72 and 73 that converge inwardly in the direction of flow.

In the form illustrated in Fig. 4, the body member 12 provides a chamber 13, as in the previous forms. The insert 15 provides an inlet orifice 14 to the chamber; and an outlet passage forming member 18, communicating with the chamber, discharges the sampled fiuid'into the collection jar 17.

In the present form, however, a needle valve or agitator member is provided that is longitudinally reciprocable to provide a cyclic motion for dispersing the liquid -at the inner `side of the orifice.' The `valve member 80 may manually be worked back and forth in the orifice 14, or otherwise be cyclically moved, so that the tapered end 81 closely approaches the edge of the orifice 14, to jar loose collections of wax or the like.

The member 80 is supported for such longitudinal movement by the aid of a sleeve 82 telescopingly received in the right-hand end of the chamber 13. The sleeve 82 has a longitudinal recess 83, through which the valve member 80 extends. An inwardly extending flange 84 of the sleeve 82 provides an aperture 85 guidingly receiving the forward portion of the valve member 80. A fiange 86, near the other end of the member 80, is slidably engageable with the walls of the recess 83. The member 80 is not only supported for longitudinal movement, but is also rotatably supported. Thus, rotation may also be imparted to the member 80 which, coupled with cyclic longitudinal movement, may be especially effective in clearing the orifice 14.

The sleeve 82 is adjustably mounted in the chamber 13 by the aid of threaded engagement therewith. A knob 87 has a cup-shaped recess 88 receiving the end of the sleeve 82. A set screw 89 secures the knob 87 of the sleeve 32 against relative angular movement. The knob 87 may be appropriately knurled to facilitate adjustment of the sleeve 82 with respect to the body 12.

The end 80a of the valve or agitator member 80 extends rearwardly of the sleeve 82, an aperture 90 in the bottom of the recess 88 of the knob 87 providing ample clearance for passage of this end 80a. Aknurled knob 91 is secured to this end 80a as by the aid of a set screw 92. An eccentric 93, the eccentricity of which is exaggerated, is in engagement with the end 80a of the valve member S0. Accordingly, rotation of the eccentric 93 causes a continuous cyclic or reciprocatory movement of the needle valve member 80. A compression spring 94 engages respectively opposed surfaces of the knobs 87 and 91 for maintaining the end 80a ofthe valve member 80 in engagement with the eccentric 93.

In the forms illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive, the valve structures can be readily removed without otherwise disassembling the remaining structure. Thus, the sleeve 26 and the sleeve 82 can be entirely detached from the body 12 for replacement and repair.

In the forms illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6, a body member 101 has a through transverse passageway 102 aligned with and forming a part of a pipe line formed by inlet and outlet conduits 103 and 104, respectively. These conduits 103 and 104 register with opposite ends of the passageway 102.

A through passageway 105 intersects the possageway 102 at right angles thereto. Hollow fittings 106 and 107 extend into the through aperture 105 from opposite ends thereof. The fittings 106 and 107 are provided with suitable threads 108 and 109 engaging threads 110 provided in the aperture 105.

The the inner ends 10661 and 107a of the fittings 106 and 107 are spaced from each other to define an enlargement 111 of the passage 102. A chamber formed by a recess 112 of the fitting 106 communicates with the enlargement 111 through a restricted opening. For this purpose, an orifice forming insert 117 is accommodated against a shoulder 118 formed at the inner end of the recess 112. A conical surface 117a on one side of the insert 117 provides a knife-edge orifice 119, as in the form illustrated in Fig. 1. This orifice 119 has proportions similar to those described in connection with the form illustrated in Fig. l. This orifice 119 provides restricted iiow into the chamber from the enlargement 111 of the passage 102. Accordingly, a small portion of the fluid fiowiug through the passage 102 is continuously diverted into the chamber formed by the recess 112.

A tubular outlet forming member 113 is in communication with the recess or passage 112 and forms the outlet therefrom to a collection jar 114. The outlet conduit 113 6 extends through a bossed aperture ^in a jar holding cap 116, substantially as in the previous forms.

A needle valve member 120 is rotatably and adjustably carried by the other fitting 107. A sleeve 121, similar to the sleeve 26 of the form illustrated in Fig. 1, rotatably mounts the needle valve structure 120. The valve member 120 extends in a through aperture 124 of the sleeve 121. For rotatably mounting the valve member 120, ball-bearing structures 122 and 123 are accommodated on reduced portions of `the valve member 120. Resilient split rings 125' and 126, accommodated in appropriate recesses in the sleeve aperture 124, cooperate with shoulders 127 and 128 of the valve member 120 to retain the valve member 120 and the bearing structures 122 and 123 in definite longitudinal positions with respect -to the sleeve 121.

The sleeve 121 is telescopically and guidingly received in a through bore 129 of the fitting 107. The valve member 120 extends across the chamber 111 and isaligned with the orifice 119. The tapered end of the valve member 120 is located adjacent the edges forming the orifice 119 or within the orifice 119. Exterior threads 130 of the sleeve 121 and interior threads 131 of the fitting 107 serve to mount the sleeve 121 for longitudinal adjustment. Such longitudinal adjustment serves to move the end of the valve member 120 with respect to the orifice 119 to control the effective flow area thereof.

To facilitate this adjustment of the sleeve 121 and valve member 120, a knul-led knob 132 is provided. This.

knob 132 has a cup-shaped recess 133 receiving the end of the sleeve 121. A set screw 134 holds the knobs 132 against angular movement with respect to the sleeve 121. A cap 135 threadedly engages the exterior of the fitting 107, and encloses the adjusting knob 132.

In order to agitate the fluid passing through the body member 110 so that it is of homogeneous consistency, an impeller blade structure 136 is mounted upon the valve member 120. For this purpose, the impeller 136 has a central aperture 137 through which the end of the valve member 120 extends. A ange 138 on the valve member 120 cooperates with a lock nut 139 to secure the impeller 136 to the valve member 120.

As shown most clearly in Fig. 6, the axis of the valve member 120 lies substantially below the axis of the fluid passageway 102 of the body member 101. Accordingly, there is an appropriate imbalance produced to cause rotation of the valve member and the impeller 136 in a clockwise direction with the direction of fiuid fiow indicated by the arrows. By virtue of the agitating action of this impeller, that portion of the uid passing through the orifice 119 is an accurate sample of the fluid passing through the body member 101. In addition, the rotation of the valve member 102 caused by the impeller 136 promotes continuous and uninterrupted ow through the orifice 119.

The form illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6 brings the fluid Aof the conduit 103, 104 to a homogeneous mixture so that the sample received in the jar 114 is accurate. This is achieved by the impeller 136. This form is useful where the installationlis made remote from a meter, which meter might otherwise be relied upon for this function.

By providing a connector, such as is shown in connection with the form illustrated in Fig. l, an outside source of rotary motion could be used to impart rotary motion to the Valve member 120.

The inventor claims:

1. In a device for collecting samples from a stream of fluid: means forming an orifice for the passage of fluid; a member having a surface cooperating with the orice to define a flow path through the orifice; said member having a stem aligned with the orifice; a sleeve supporting the stem; means adjustably mounting the sleeve for movement in a direction longitudinally of the stem for varying the size of the flow path through said orifice; and

-7 means for moving said member through repeated cycles with respect to the orifice.

2. In a fluid sampler: a conduit for the through flow of fiuid; means defining a sampling passage transverse to the conduit; an outlet member for the passage; means defining an orifice between the conduit and the passage; a member having a surface cooperating with the orifice to determine the effective area of the orifice opening; said member having a stern aligned with the orifice; means for rotatably supporting the stem; and means carried by the stem and located in the path of through fiow of the fiud in the conduit for rotating the stem.

3. In a fluid sampler: a conduit; means forming a sampling passage from the conduit; means defining an inlet orifice between the conduit and the sampling passage; a member having a surface cooperating with the orifice to determine the effectivey area of the opening of said orifice; said member having a rotary shaft aligned with said orifice; a mounting fixed with respect to the orifice; a sleeve carried by the mounting for longitudinal movement, the sleeve extending substantially parallel to the shaft; bearings carried by the sleeve for rotatably supporting the shaft; means coupling the shaft and the bearings for longitudinal movement with the sleeve; means for adjusting the longitudinal position of the sleeve with respect to the mounting and with respect to the orifice; and means for rotating said shaft.

4. In a fiuid sampler: a conduit for the through flow of fluid; means defining a sampling passage transverse to the conduit; an outlet member for the passage; means defining an orifice between the conduit and the passage; a member having a surface cooperating with the orifice t0 determine the effective area of the orifice opening; said member having a stem aligned with the orifice; a mounting fixed with respect to the orifice; a sleeve surrounding the stern and carried by the mounting for longitudinal movement in la direction toward and away from said orifice; 'bearing structures carried by hte sleeve for rotatably supporting the stem; means coupling the stern and the bearings for longitudinal movement with the sleeve; means 'cr adjusting the longitudinal position of the sleeve with respect to the mounting and with respect to the orifice; and means for rotating the stem.

5. The combination as set forth in claim 4, in which the meansV for rotating the stern comprises an impeller structure mounted on the stem and in the path of through flow of fluid in the conduit.

6. The combination as set forth in claim 4 in which the means for rotating the stem is operated by the through flow of fluid in the conduit.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,055,063 Meriam Mar. 4, 1913 1,470,974 Hai-dinge Oct. 16, 1923 1,805,733 Eckstine May 19, 1931 1,865,316 Hanrahan et al June 28, 1932 1,911,351 Cole May 30, 1933 2,520,430 Pearson Aug. 29, 1950 2,589,712 Langsenkamp etal Mar. 18, 1952

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Classifications
U.S. Classification73/863.86
International ClassificationG01N1/20
Cooperative ClassificationG01N1/2035
European ClassificationG01N1/20B