Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2845959 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1958
Filing dateMar 26, 1956
Priority dateMar 26, 1956
Publication numberUS 2845959 A, US 2845959A, US-A-2845959, US2845959 A, US2845959A
InventorsSidebotham John B
Original AssigneeSidebotham John B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bifurcated textile tubes and method of weaving the same
US 2845959 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 5, 1958 J. B. SIDEBOTHAM 2,845,959

BIFURCATED TEXTILE TUBES AND METHOD OF WEA-VING THE SAME Filed March 26, 1956 INV NTO J04 5. Grazia #0 BY QM ATTORNEY United States Patent BIFURCATED TEXTILE TUBES AND METHOD OF WEAVING THE SAME John B. Sidebotham, Philadelphia, Pa. Application March 26, 1956, Serial No. 573,744 13 Claims. (Cl. 139-387) This invention relates to bifurcated textile tubes and a method of weaving the same, and it relates more particularly to tubes adapted for use in surgical operations, namely, for the replacement of certain diseased or damaged arteries.

'It frequently happens that arteries ofhuman beings and other animals become diseased or injured whereby replacement of the same becomes necessary. It has been found particularly diflicult to replace such arteries with artificial tubing "at locations such, for example, as where the aorta branches into the iliac arteries, or in similar conditions in a living body wherever a larger artery branches into two smaller ones.

In such locations, Where the branching of the arteries occurs, it is desirable that the cross-sectional area of the two tubes beyond the branching shall be substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the large or main tube, as otherwise differences in pressure and flow would occur in the tubes.

-It has been found by actual experimentation that woven tubes may be used in which the warp and weft are made of certain of the modern plastics, the various surgical operators, however, preferring yarns of diflferent materials, and it therefore follows that the particular yarn employed in the carrying out of the present invention is not an essential feature thereof, although in the use of certain of the plastic yarns which are available and adaptable, advantage may be taken of the inherent characteristics thereof, such for example, as the known heatfusibility of nylon and various other plastic yarns.

The principal difliculty encountered in attempts to make woven bifurcated tubes for arterial replacements arises out of the desirability of the elimination of distortion, such as bulging or constriction, at the place of branching from a larger tube into two smaller ones.

The principal object therefore of the present invention is to provide seamless woven textile bifurcated tubes which are particularly adaptable for use as artificial arteries employed by surgeons for the replacement of diseased or damaged arteries at places where a larger tube branches into two smaller ones.

A further object of the invention is to provide woven bifurcated tubes to serve as arterial replacements in which there will be no objectionable bulging or constriction at the place where an artery branches from a single larger tube to two smaller tubes.

A further object of the invention is to provide bifurcated arterial replacements of the character aforesaid, in which the cross-sectional area of the small tubes beyond the branch will be substantially equal to that of the crosssectional area of the main tube when said tubes are distended in use.

The nature and characteristic features of the present invention will be more readily understood from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing forming part hereof, in which:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of a portion of a biapproximately one-half 2,845,959 Patented Aug. 5, 1958 furcated woven textile tube made in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a view somewhat similar to Fig. l, but with a portion of a branch tube raised at the place of bifurcation for the purpose of illustrating a preferred manner of sealing at the bifurcation to prevent leakage at that "location;

Fig. 3 is a view also somewhat similar to Fig. 1, illustrating another form of sealing means at the place of branching;

Fig. 4 is a schematic or diagrammatic cross section illustrating the manner of weaving the main tube;

Fig. 5 is a similar view illustrating the manner of weaving at the place where the bifurcation occurs; and

Fig. 6 is a similar view illustrating the manner of weaving the branch tubes beyond the bifurcation. I

-It should, of course, be understood that the description and drawing herein are illustrative merely, and that various modifications and changes may be made in the structure'and method disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1 of the drawing, there is there shown a portion of bifurcated tubing woven in accordance with the present invention, which consists of a larger or main tube 11, branching into two smaller tubes 12 and 13. It should be understood that, for the best results, the cross-sectional area of the larger tube 11, when distended, should be substantially equal to that of the combined cross-sectional area of the branch tubes 12 and 13, when distended, and for this purpose it will be found that the number of warp ends in the larger tube will be proportioned to the number of warp ends of each of the smaller tubes in a ratio of approximately 10 to 7. i

As the warp ends in the main tube 11 are necessarily less than the number used in the branch tubes 12 and 13, there will, during the weaving of the main tube 11, be an excess of warp ends which may be internally floated during the weaving of the main tube.

The main tube 11, as well also as the branch tubes 12 and 13, are each woven in a manner similar to that used for weaving pillow cases and other tubular fabrics. the simple form of such weaving, it is Well known that at least two sheds must be formed, and one shed contains the other shed, thereby to avoid inclusion of two warp ends between the successive crossings of the filling at one side during the weaving.

"In the weaving of the present product, at least two shuttles are required, which are used in a manner to be presently explained. in the weaving controls would be The filling inserted in the weaving of the main tube 11 is designated S this filling also being used in the weaving of a closure tab 26, and one of the branch tubes, whereas the filling inserted by the other shuttle is designated as S the same "being used for the Weaving of another closure tab 27, and the other branch tube.

Each of the branch tubes is thus woven by a separate shuttle as indicated in Fig. 6 of the drawing, during the weaving of which the warp ends which have been floated during the weaving of the main tube 11, are subdivided, going into one of the branch tubes, and the other half going into the other of the branch tubes.

For the proper formation of the fabric as above set forth, it is necessary in the weaving that portions of the tubes 12 and 13 should overlap to the extent of the width in the shed of the warp ends which are internally floated duing the weaving of the main tube 11.

During the weaving of the tubes it is preferable for the connection with the weaving 3 manipulation of the warp to use at least twelve harness frames, although it is possible to use a different or larger number.

A careful consideration of Figs. 4, 5 and 6 of the drawing will make clear the manner in which the weaving may be accomplished.

It is, of course, well known that in the weaving of tubular fabrics such, for example, as pillow cases and the like, at least four harness frames must be employed, as two separate sheds must be successively formed for the alternate passage of the shuttle therethrough, and there should be one more warp end in one shed than in the other shed as, otherwise, there would be two warp ends included between successive crossings of the filling at one of the sides during the weaving.

As hereinbefore set forth, in the weaving of bifurcated tubes in accordance with the present invention, a greater number of warp ends are required in the branch-tubes 12 and 13 than in the main tube 11, and consequently, there will be .an excess of warp ends during the weaving of the main tube 11, which warp ends are internally floated during the weaving of the main tube 11.

The warp ends which are floated during the weaving of the main tube 11, at the branching of the single tube into the two branch tubes, are subdivided to form two separate sheds, each interwoven with filling threads S and S supplied by the several shuttles, this being done for the purpose of more effective sealing, and for preventing leakage. The feed of the loom is stopped for about ten picks at the time the floating threads above referred to are being interwoven with the filling at the branching.

' Referring now more particularly to Fig. 4 of the drawing, which illustrates diagrammatically the weaving of the main tube portion 11 of the fabric at which time one set of warp ends 14 is controlled by one harness frame, and another set of warp ends 15 is controlled by another harness frame to form successive sheds for weaving the portion of the top cloth at the center and left end. Another set of warp ends 16 is controlled by another harness frame, and a corresponding set of warp ends 17 is controlled by another harness frame to complete the weaving of the top cloth of the main tube 11.

For the purpose of weaving the bottom cloth of the main tube 11 there is provided a set of warp ends 18 and a corresponding set of warp ends 19, each set being controlled by a harness frame for the purpose of successively shedding the same to weave the portion of the bottom cloth of the main tube 11 at the left end of Fig. 4. For weaving the remaining portion of the bottom cloth of the main tube 11, there are provided two sets of warp ends 20 and 21, each controlled by a separate harness frame for successively shedding said warp ends disposed at the center and right end of Fig. 4.

Passing now to a consideration of Fig. 6, which is a diagrammatic illustration of the weaving of the two tubes 12 and 13, it will here be noted that the top cloth of the tube 12 formed by the interweaving of the filling S from one of the shuttles with the warp ends 14 and 15. The left portion of the bottom cloth of tube 12 is formed by the interweaving of said filling with the warp ends 18 and 19.

The remaining portion of the bottom cloth of tube 12 is formed by the interweaving of two sets of warp ends 22 and 23, each controlled by a separate harness frame, with the filling S from the first shuttle which had previously been used for the weaving of the main tube 11.

The other tube 13 is formed in a similar manner, in this instance, the lower cloth being formed by interweaving the filling S from the second shuttle with the warp ends 20 and 21 hereinbefore described as being used in of the main tube 11. The right end of the upper cloth of the tube 13 is formed by the interweaving of said tle with the warp ends 16 and 17, previously referred to,

filling S from the second shut- '4 which are used in the weaving of the top cloth of tube 11, whereas, the remaining portion of the top cloth of tube 13 at the left end thereof is formed by the interweaving of said filling S with the warp ends 24 and 25 controlled by their respective harness frames.

Referring now to Fig. 5 of the drawing, there is there shown diagrammatically a preferred manner of weaving at the place where the branching occurs. Upon referring to Fig. 5 of the drawing it will be noted that at this place the warp ends 22 and 23 are interwoven with the filling S whereas the warp ends 24 and 25 are interwoven with the filling S thereby providing two separate woven tabs 26 and 27 for a purpose to be presently explained, which tabs are initially disposed interiorly and tightly woven. During the weaving of the tabs 26 and 27, the cloth feed of the loom may be stopped and the tabs 26 and 27 woven during a short run of approximately ten picks.

During the weaving of the main tube 11, the warp ends 22, 23, 24 and 25 are floated interiorly as indicated in Figs. 1 and 4 of the drawing. However, in the form of the invention in which the tabs 26 and 27 are woven as aforesaid, the yarns used are preferably of the heatfusible or scalable type, whereby the tabs 26 and 27 may be subsequently fused or joined to each other.

For the purpose of efiecting the sealing by uniting the tabs 26 and 27 to each other, the terminal portions of the warp ends 22, 23, 24 and 25 at the upper end of the tube 11 are tied to each other, whereupon a hook (not shown) may be inserted through the opening between the tabs 26 and 27, and the said warp ends may then be pulled through at the branch to a location between the branch tubes 12 and 13 on the outside thereof, together with the tabs 26 and 27, as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawing. When in this condition the tabs 26 and 27 may be secured to each other by heat-fusing or, if preferred, the tabs 26 and 27 may be joined by a suitable adhesive, or any other means may be used to close the fabric at the place of branching.

After the sealing has been effected, the loose warp ends 22, 23, 24 and 25 may be severed from the tabs, as they are of no use and would be objectionable in the finished structure.

In Figure 3 of the drawing there is illustrated another manner of closing the fabric at the branching place which consists in first turning the main tube 11 inside out, down to the branching and then pairing and separating a number of the loose or floating yarn ends and tying the same, after which the free ends may be severed adjacent the knots 28.

By the foregoing arrangement and method of weaving there is provided a woven bifurcated tube particularly adaptable for surgical use in the replacement of diseased and damaged arteries. Such bifurcated tubes have been found experimentally to be very effective for their indicated purpose.

I claim:

1. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the total cross-sectional area of the branch tubes, when distended, is substantially the same as the cross-sectional area of the main tube when distended.

2. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the number of interwoven warp ends in the main tube is less than the total number of warp ends in the smaller tubes.

3. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the number of interwoven warp ends in the main tube is less than the total number of warp ends in the smaller tubes, and in which the excess ends are interwoven with filling at the place of the branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube.

4. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the total cross-sectional area of the branch tubes, when distended, is substantially the same as the cross-sectional area of the main tube, when distended, in which. the

number of interwoven warp ends in the main tube is less than the total number of warp ends in the smaller tubes, and in which the excess ends are interwoven with filling at the place of the branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube, and in which certain of the yarns are of the heat-scalable type and are fused at the place of branching.

5. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the total cross-sectional area of the branch tubes, when distended, is substantially the same as the cross-sectional area of the main tube, when distended, in which the number of warp ends in the main tube is proportioned to the number of warp ends in each of the smaller tubes in a ratio of approximately to 7, and in which the excess ends are interwoven with filling at the place of branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube to provides tabs which are secured to each other.

6. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the total cross-sectional area of the branch tubes, when distended, is substantially the same as the cross-sectional area of the main tube, when distended, in which the number of warp ends in the main tube is proportioned to the number of Warp ends in each of the smaller tubes in a ratio of approximately 10 to 7, and in which the excess ends are interwoven with filling at the place of the branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube, to provide tabs which are secured to each other at the place of branching.

7. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the total cross-sectional area of the branch tubes, when distended, is substantially the same as the cross-sectional area of the main tube, when distended, in which the number of warp ends in the main tube is proportioned to the number of warp ends in each of the smaller tubes in a ratio of approximately 10 to 7, and in which the excess ends are interwoven with filling at the place of branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube to provide tabs in which certain of the yarns are of heatsealable type and are fused to provide a closure at the place of branching.

8. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in using, for the weaving of the main tube, a number of warp ends less than the total number of warp ends in the smaller tubes, and floating the excess ends internally during the weaving of the main tube.

9. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes in which the total cross-sectional area of the branch tubes, when distended, is substantially the same as the cross-sectional area of the main tube, when distended, which consists in using, for the weaving of the main tube, a number of warp ends proportioned to the number of warp ends in each of the smaller tubes in a ratio of ing for a short run with the approximately 10 to 7, and floating the excess ends internally during the weaving of the main tube.

10. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of pairs of warp ends during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing certain of the ends which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabric of each of the branch tubes.

11. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of pairs of Warp ends during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing certain of the ends which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabric of each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes interweaving the fillwarp ends which are floated as aforesaid, to form tabs for sealing the tubes at the branching.

12. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of pairs of warp ends during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing certain of the ends which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabric of each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes interweaving the filling for a short run with the warp ends which are floated as aforesaid to provide tabs, securing the tabs to each other, and cutting off the loose portions of the floating ends beyond said tabs.

13. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of pairs of warp ends during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing certain of the ends which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabric of each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes interweaving the filling for a short run with the warp ends which are floated as aforesaid to form sealing tabs, certain of the yarns employed having heat-scalable qualities, heat-sealing the tabs to each other, and cutting off the loose portions of the floating ends beyond said tabs.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 462,040 Fox Oct. 27, 1891 1,062,238 Jennings May 20, 1913 1,095,740 Seidman May 5, 1914 1,794,159 Dinsmore Feb. 24, 1931 2,046,039 Schaar June 30, 1936 OTHER REFERENCES Surgery, 1955, vol. 37, pp. 169 to 171. Surgery, 1955, vol. 38, pp. 68, 69. Annals of Surgery, 1955, vol. 142., pp. 628 to 630.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US462040 *Jun 19, 1890Oct 27, 1891 Woven pantaloons
US1062238 *Feb 8, 1911May 20, 1913Mills Woven Cartridge Belt CompanyHolster-web and method of weaving the same.
US1095740 *May 9, 1913May 5, 1914Charles SeidmanNecktie.
US1794159 *May 28, 1930Feb 24, 1931Hope Webbing CompanyFinishing welt
US2046039 *Aug 4, 1934Jun 30, 1936Arnold SchaarTextile article
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2978787 *Apr 18, 1957Apr 11, 1961Meadox Medicals IncSynthetic vascular implants and the manufacture thereof
US2990605 *Jan 30, 1957Jul 4, 1961Demsyk PaulMethod of forming artificial vascular members
US3011527 *May 23, 1957Dec 5, 1961RhodiacetaProsthesis consisting of textile materials
US3019821 *Jul 31, 1957Feb 6, 1962White Charles SLow friction fabric material
US3029819 *Jul 30, 1959Apr 17, 1962J L McateeArtery graft and method of producing artery grafts
US3096560 *Nov 21, 1958Jul 9, 1963William J LiebigProcess for synthetic vascular implants
US3272204 *Sep 22, 1965Sep 13, 1966Ethicon IncAbsorbable collagen prosthetic implant with non-absorbable reinforcing strands
US4562596 *Apr 25, 1984Jan 7, 1986Elliot KornbergAortic graft, device and method for performing an intraluminal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair
US6077296 *Mar 4, 1998Jun 20, 2000Endologix, Inc.Endoluminal vascular prosthesis
US6090128 *Feb 20, 1997Jul 18, 2000Endologix, Inc.Bifurcated vascular graft deployment device
US6117117 *Aug 24, 1998Sep 12, 2000Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated catheter assembly
US6156063 *May 28, 1998Dec 5, 2000Endologix, Inc.Method of deploying bifurcated vascular graft
US6165195 *Aug 13, 1997Dec 26, 2000Advanced Cardiovascylar Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6187036Dec 11, 1998Feb 13, 2001Endologix, Inc.Endoluminal vascular prosthesis
US6197049Feb 17, 1999Mar 6, 2001Endologix, Inc.Articulating bifurcation graft
US6210380Apr 4, 2000Apr 3, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated catheter assembly
US6210422Feb 16, 2000Apr 3, 2001Endologix, Inc.Bifurcated vascular graft deployment device
US6221090Sep 23, 1999Apr 24, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent delivery assembly
US6221098Dec 9, 1999Apr 24, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6254593Dec 10, 1999Jul 3, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated stent delivery system having retractable sheath
US6261316Mar 11, 1999Jul 17, 2001Endologix, Inc.Single puncture bifurcation graft deployment system
US6264682Oct 5, 1999Jul 24, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6331190Jan 14, 2000Dec 18, 2001Endologix, Inc.Endoluminal vascular prosthesis
US6361544Dec 1, 1999Mar 26, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6361555Dec 15, 1999Mar 26, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and stent delivery assembly and method of use
US6371978May 8, 2001Apr 16, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated stent delivery system having retractable sheath
US6383213Mar 24, 2001May 7, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6387120Apr 26, 2001May 14, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6428567Apr 24, 2001Aug 6, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6475208Jan 22, 2001Nov 5, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated catheter assembly
US6494875Sep 8, 2000Dec 17, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated catheter assembly
US6500202Mar 15, 2000Dec 31, 2002Endologix, Inc.Bifurcation graft deployment catheter
US6508835Nov 28, 2000Jan 21, 2003Endologix, Inc.Endoluminal vascular prosthesis
US6508836Jun 14, 2001Jan 21, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6544219Dec 15, 2000Apr 8, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter for placement of therapeutic devices at the ostium of a bifurcation of a body lumen
US6579312Jun 14, 2001Jun 17, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6582394Nov 14, 2000Jun 24, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcated vessels
US6599315Nov 20, 2001Jul 29, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and stent delivery assembly and method of use
US6660030Dec 22, 2000Dec 9, 2003Endologix, Inc.Bifurcation graft deployment catheter
US6663665Feb 28, 2001Dec 16, 2003Endologix, Inc.Single puncture bifurcation graft deployment system
US6673107Dec 6, 1999Jan 6, 2004Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated stent and method of making
US6695877Feb 26, 2002Feb 24, 2004Scimed Life SystemsBifurcated stent
US6733523Jun 26, 2001May 11, 2004Endologix, Inc.Implantable vascular graft
US6780174Dec 16, 2002Aug 24, 2004Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated catheter assembly
US6802856Apr 16, 2002Oct 12, 2004Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated stent delivery system having retractable sheath
US6875229Jan 27, 2003Apr 5, 2005Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6896699Oct 8, 2003May 24, 2005Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US6951572Aug 12, 2003Oct 4, 2005Endologix, Inc.Bifurcated vascular graft and method and apparatus for deploying same
US6953475Sep 30, 2003Oct 11, 2005Endologix, Inc.Bifurcation graft deployment catheter
US6955688Jul 16, 2003Oct 18, 2005Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US7481837Oct 7, 2004Jan 27, 2009Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Bifurcated stent delivery system having retractable sheath
US7520895Apr 8, 2002Apr 21, 2009Endologix, Inc.Self expanding bifurcated endovascular prosthesis
US7753950Aug 7, 2007Jul 13, 2010Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US7799064Feb 26, 2002Sep 21, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcated stent and delivery system
US7892277May 3, 2006Feb 22, 2011Endologix, Inc.Self expanding bifurcated endovascular prosthesis
US7955379Aug 7, 2007Jun 7, 2011Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc.Stent and catheter assembly and method for treating bifurcations
US8034100Nov 25, 2003Oct 11, 2011Endologix, Inc.Graft deployment system
US8118856Jul 27, 2010Feb 21, 2012Endologix, Inc.Stent graft
US8147535Jul 25, 2005Apr 3, 2012Endologix, Inc.Bifurcation graft deployment catheter
US8167925Mar 25, 2010May 1, 2012Endologix, Inc.Single puncture bifurcation graft deployment system
US8216295Jul 1, 2009Jul 10, 2012Endologix, Inc.Catheter system and methods of using same
US8236040Apr 11, 2008Aug 7, 2012Endologix, Inc.Bifurcated graft deployment systems and methods
US8343211Dec 14, 2005Jan 1, 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Connectors for bifurcated stent
US8357192Mar 11, 2011Jan 22, 2013Endologix, Inc.Bifurcated graft deployment systems and methods
US8435284Dec 14, 2005May 7, 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Telescoping bifurcated stent
US8491646Jul 15, 2010Jul 23, 2013Endologix, Inc.Stent graft
US8523931Jan 12, 2007Sep 3, 2013Endologix, Inc.Dual concentric guidewire and methods of bifurcated graft deployment
US8632579Sep 15, 2010Jan 21, 2014Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcated stent and delivery system
US8764812Jan 18, 2013Jul 1, 2014Endologix, Inc.Bifurcated graft deployment systems and methods
USRE40404Dec 15, 1999Jun 24, 2008Maquet Cardiovascular, LlpThinly woven flexible graft
WO1998036708A1 *Feb 6, 1998Aug 27, 1998Endologix IncBifurcated vascular graft and method and apparatus for deploying same
WO1999065419A1May 28, 1999Dec 23, 1999Endologix IncSelf expanding bifurcated endovascular prosthesis
WO2000053251A1Mar 7, 2000Sep 14, 2000Endologix IncSingle puncture bifurcation graft deployment system
WO2003045284A2Nov 27, 2002Jun 5, 2003Univ New York State Res FoundEndovascular graft and graft trimmer
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/387.00R
International ClassificationD03D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D3/00
European ClassificationD03D3/00