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Publication numberUS2846687 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1958
Filing dateSep 13, 1955
Priority dateSep 13, 1955
Publication numberUS 2846687 A, US 2846687A, US-A-2846687, US2846687 A, US2846687A
InventorsBernard Lippman
Original AssigneeBernard Lippman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Man's shirt
US 2846687 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 12, 1958 B. LIPPMAN Y 2,846,687

MAN S SHIRT Filed Sept. 13, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEY Aug. 12, 1958 Filed sept. 13. 195s Fly. 7

B. LIPPMAN 2,846,587

MAN's SHIRT 2 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR. BERNARD LIPPMAN ATTORNEY MANS SHIRT Bernard iLippman, New York, N. Y.

Application September i3, 1955, 'Serial No. 534,100 e Ciatms. (ci. z -11s) The present invention relates to a shirt, and more particularly to a mans dress shirt which possesses both the appearance of a dress shirt, and the ease of wear and comfort of a sport shirt. Moreover, the shirt may permit undergarments, such as underwear to be dispensed with, and in fact renders the use of underwear more or less superfluous.

ilens dress shirts or business shirts of woven woven materials, such as woven cotton, or other fabrics Suder from certain serious handicaps. Thus, such shirts, unlike knitted garments, do not tit the body accurately, because the stability of woven fabrics allows insufcient latitude for accurate fitting. To remain sightly and in operative position on the wearer such shirts require tails which are tucked beneath the upper portion of the wears trousers. rhe presence of this extra material inevitably leads to unattractive-bulging or flung of the shirt material. It is also inevitable that body movement of the wearer dishevels the disposition of the garment.

Moreover, because such shirts lack form-fitting characteristics; and because of the inherent nature of woven materials, such shirts lack absorbency or undergarment attributes.

it has not proved feasible to construct a mans dress shirt with a form-retaining permanently attached or integral fold-over collar of knitted fabric, and to a lesser degree with form-retaining cuis of knitted fabric. The laundering characteristics of most knitted fabrics lead to relatively uncontrolled shrinkage (as compared with woven fabrics) and render such materials unsuitable for garments requiring a form-retaining collar and/or form retaining cuffs.

However, knitted fabrics possess a number of marked advantages over woven fabrics as a shirting material. Thus, they are form-fitting and create the impression of ease of wear and Well-being. relationship of knitted yarns, knitted fabrics are relatively more absorbent. Being both form-fitting and absorbent, a knitted garment absorbs the wearers perspiration and markedly aids his comfort. ln addition, knitted fabrics are wrinkle-resistant and do not form unsightly creases.

ln recent years yarns made from synthetic polymers, such as Daeron (a copolymer of ethylene glycol and terepntnalic acid), and nylon (a copolymer of hexamethylene diamine and adipic acid) both of which are manufactured by E. l. duont Company, of Wilmington, Delaware, have been devoloped which form wrinkle-resistant woven fabrics, which are fast drying and resemble knitted fabrics in that ironing after laundering is unnecessary.

The present invention has as an object the provision of a mans dress shirt of the type having a permanently attached foldover collar possessing sightliness.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of an attractive mans dress shirt which will eliminate the need for an absorbent undergarment.

Another object of the present invention is the provision By virtue of the spatial of an attractive mans dress shirt having a much longer useful life than conventional shirts of woven fabric.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of an attractive mans dress shirt which when worn beneat a jacket is indistinguishable from a completely woven dress shirt, but which possesses the comfort, ease of movement and form-fitting characteristics of a knitted sport skirt.

A diierent object of the present invention is the provision of an attractive mans dress shirt in which excess anchorage material is eliminated.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a mans shirt over which a jacket or coat may be draped with the optimum attractive appearance.

Other objects will appear hereafter.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention there are shown in the drawings form which are presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the present arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

Figure l is a front elevation of one embodiment of the shirt of the present invention.

Figure 2 is a rear elevation of the shirt embodiment of Figure l.

Figure 3 is a section on line 3 3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary view of the upper portion of the shirt, opened to reveal the undersurface thereof.

Figure 5 is a front elevation of another embodiment of the shirt of the present invention. Y

Figure 6 is a rear elevation of the shirt embodiment of Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a front elevation of another embodiment of the shirt of the present invention.

Figure 8 is a section on line 8 8 of Figure 7.

Referring initially to Figures l through 4 inclusive, the shirt of the present invention shown therein is designated 10. Shirt l@ is of the slip-over or pull-over dress shirt Variety and is provided with a head opening formed by the neck opening and a slit bosom. The slit bosom terminates at reinforced anchor stitch l2, which forms the uppermost stitching of anchor tab F14. The slit bosom is provided with mating facings i6 and i3, which are superposed when the shirt is worn; facing i6 carrying button-holes 20 superposed above facing i8 carrying buttons 22. Buttons 22 are matingly aligned with button holes 20, and are engaged therewith when the shirt is worn. Facings 16 and i8 are preferably formed of a wrinkleresistant synthetic polymer material, such as Daeron or nylon. When buttons 22 and button holes Zt) are not engaged with each other, the head opening formed by the neck opening and the slit bosom is large enough to permit shirt 19 to be slipped over the head of the wearer.

Shirt lil is provided with a permanently attached foldover collar designated generally as 24, which may be provided with button holes to receive mating tab anchorage buttons 26 for retaining the collar tips or collar tabs in attractive disposition, when worn.

Collar 2d is preferably formed of a plurality of plies of woven collar fabric material, preferably a wrinkleresistant synthetic polymer material, such as Daeron or nylon, retained together by stitching Z8, which is evenly spaced to and parallel with the edge of collar 24.

The body 3i) of shirt i@ is formed of knitted material, preferably knitted material bearing a design such as a diamond or triangular design, so as to simulate the better grades of white on white woven shirting. Cotton fibers are to be preferred for the knitted body portion, because of their high absorbency.

Sleeves 32 are of knitted material identical to that forming body Si?, and are joined to body 36 at armholes 31- by reinforced overlook stitching, which overlock stitching tolerates stretching due to movement of the wearers arms while simultaneously permitting ease of movement, and achieving form-fitting comfort.

rilhe extremities of sleeves 32 are slit at 36 in the region proximate the lower forearm of the wearer. Sleeves 32 are provided with cuifs 33 of multi-ply woven material, such as material similar to fold-over collar 24..

Cuffs 3S are provided with a cuff button 4Q and a mating button hole to permit closure about the wrists of the wearer.

Superposed over body 3@ of the shirt fr@ is a yoke 42, which extends about collar 24 and between arm holes 34. Yoke-42 is of single ply woven material made from awrinkle-resistant synthetic polymer, such as Daeron or nylon, and is joined by line of stitching 44 to the back portion of knitted shirt body 3G and by line of stitching 46 to the collar band 48 formed of multiply woven fabric made from a similar Wrinkle-resistant synthetic polymer. Collar 24 is secured to collar band 48 in any suitable conventional manner as by stitching 50. The front portion of collar band 48 is joined to facings 16 and i3. The outer edges of facings 16 and l are joined by respective lines of stitching 52, 54 to the knitted shirt body 30* and woven shirt front 58.

Woven shirt front S is formed of a continuous piece of fabric, made from a wrinkle-resistant synthetic polymer, such as Daeron or nylon, and extends between parallel lines of stitching 60 and 61. Parallel lines of stitching 60 and 6l, which join shirt'front 5S to the body 30 are spaced inwardly from arm holes 34. viding a band of knitted material 63 in front of and below the outer extremities of yoke 42, superior formiitting in the region of the arm pits can be obtained, than is impossible if shirt front 53 of woven fabric extends to arm holes 34.

Line of stitching 62 which joins the front yoke 42 to shirt front 5S and shirt body 3i? is secured to the shirt body 30 alone, in the region intermediate either line of stitching 66 or 61 and arm holes 34.

` Shirt front 58 is furnished with a pocket 64- of woven fabric likewise made from a wrinkle resistantl synthetic polymer, such as Daeron or nylon.

The front and back portions of shirt body 30 are joined by lines of overlook stitching 66 and 68.

The bottom edge 70I of shirt 1G is formed of a continuous line of overlock stitching, which in thev front of the shirt joins shirt front 58 to shirt body 30. Due

By pro-l to the form-fitting nature of the knit body portion, shirt tails are unnecessary, and the bottom edge of the shirt need extend only to below the upper edge of the wearers trousers. Y

ln the embodiment of the shirt designated 72 shown in Figures 5 and 6 the general construction proximates that of the shirt embodiment of Figures l through 4 except that instead of a pull-over or slip-over shirt, the shirt 72 shown therein is slit from the neck region to the bottom edge, and two shirt front portions 74 and 76 joined to respective'facings 73 and Sil are provided.

Facings 78 and 8@ extend from the neck region to the bottom edge. j

In the embodiment of the shirt designated S4 shown in Figures 7 and 8, the general construction proximates that of the shirt embodiment shown in Figures l through 4 except that the knitted shirt body 56 terminates at parallel lines of stitching 83 and 96, so that but asingle ply of `Jvoven shirt front 92 occupies the front central portion of the shirt.

Preferably, the knitted fabric should be one that has been stabilized against shrinkage and has a low maximum coeicient of shrinkage.

The present invention may be embodied in other specie forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof and, accordingly, reference should be made to the appended claims, rather than to the forer4l t going specification as indicating the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A mans shirt including a body of knitted fabric having armholes, sleeves of knitted fabric secured to said armholes, cuffs of woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling secured at the ends of said sleeves, a yoke of woven fabric of syn` thetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling joined to the knitted fabric, a shirt front of woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling joined to the knitted fabric, said shirt front superposed above said knitted fabric, and occupying substantially the entire area of the front ofthe shirt extending from closely adjacent one armhole to closely adjacent the other armhole, a collar band of woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling joined to said yoke and shirt front, and a fold-over collar of Woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling and including free collar tabs permanently attached to said collar band.

2. A mans shirt including a body of knitted fabric having armholes, sleeves of knitted fabric secured to said armholes, cuffs of Woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling secured at the ends of said sleeves, a yoke of woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling superposed on the knitted fabric, a shirt front of woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling superposed on the knitted fabric, said shirt front superposed above said knitted fabric, and occupying substantially the entire area of the front of the shirt extending from closely adjacent one armhole to closely adjacent the other armhole, a collar band of woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling joined to said yoke and shirt front, and a fold-over collar of Woven fabric of synthetic polymer having a high resistance to wrinkling and including free collar tabs permanently attached to said collar band.

3. A mans shirt including a body of knitted fabric having armholes, sleeves of knitted fabric secured to said armholes, cuffs of woven fabric secured at the ends of said sleeves, a yoke of woven fabric superposed on the knitted fabric, said yoke extending from armhole to armhole, a'shirt front of woven fabric superposed on the knitted fabric, said shirt front superposed above said knitted fabric, and occupying substantially the entire area of the front of the shirt extending from closely adjacent one armhole to closely adjacent the other armhole, a band of knitted fabric intermediate each armhole Vand the outer adjacent edge of said shirt front, a collar band of woven fabric joined to said yoke and shirt front, and a fold-over collar of woven fabric having free collar Vtabs permanently attached to said collar band.

4. A mans shirt including a body of knitted fabric having armholes, said body being formed from' front and back knitted portions joined together by straight lines of stitching extending from each armhole to the bottom of the shirt, sleeves, of knitted fabric secured to said armholes, cuffs of woven fabric secured at the ends of said sleeves, a yoke of woven fabric superposed on the knitted fabric, said yoke extending from armhole to armhole, a shirt front of woven fabric superposed on the knitted fabric, said shirt front superposed above said knitted fabric and occupying substantially the entire area of the front of the shirt extending from closely adjacent one armhole to closely adjacent the other armhole, said shirt front extending from the' yoke to the bottom of the shirt, a generally rectangularly shaped band of Vknitted fabric intermediate each armhole and its adjacent line of stitching and the adjacent edge of the shirt front,

Veach of said bands ofknitted fabric extending from the 5 6 collar of woven fabric having free collar tabs perma- 1,260,353 Evleth Mar. 26, 1918 nently attached to said collar band. 2,466,368 Bro'hard Apr. 5, 1949 2,676,324 Johnson Apr. 27, 1954 References Cited in the le of this patent 2,705,806 Williamson Apr. 12, 1955 UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 FOREIGN PATENTS 195,992 Edwards Oct. 9, 1877 4,054 Norway Jan. 7, 1893 1,015,231 Jacobs Jan. 16, 1912, 419,468 Great Britain Nov. 13, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US195992 *Feb 26, 1876Oct 9, 1877 Improvement in shirts
US1015231 *Feb 11, 1911Jan 16, 1912Adolph Ralph JacobsWeatherproof outing-garment.
US1260353 *Nov 12, 1917Mar 26, 1918Frances M EvlethArticle of wearing-apparel.
US2466368 *Oct 8, 1947Apr 5, 1949Brohard Jr Montie MGarment
US2676324 *Oct 4, 1949Apr 27, 1954Chicopee Mfg CorpCollar construction
US2705806 *May 5, 1954Apr 12, 1955Donovan Williamson CharlesShirt
GB419468A * Title not available
NO4054A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3421159 *Apr 24, 1967Jan 14, 1969Stebley Frank EWash and wear shirt
US4473908 *Jun 8, 1982Oct 2, 1984Gabriele KnechtGarment
US4616366 *Dec 24, 1984Oct 14, 1986Mueller George BPlacket
US5105478 *Nov 1, 1990Apr 21, 1992Pyc Chester FVentilated shirt
US7636948 *Jan 26, 2006Dec 29, 2009Lineweight LlcCombat shirt and armor system
US8549666 *Sep 29, 2010Oct 8, 2013Nike, Inc.Convertible garment
US8726414 *Jun 2, 2008May 20, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of apparel incorporating a zoned modifiable textile structure
US20060242750 *May 2, 2005Nov 2, 2006Vereen William CShirt with reinforced front
US20070083972 *Sep 26, 2006Apr 19, 2007Peter FrancisRebel office shirt
US20070294801 *Jun 1, 2007Dec 27, 2007Zuitsports, Inc.Jersey and associated method of manufacture
US20080229473 *Jun 2, 2008Sep 25, 2008Nike, Inc.Article Of Apparel Incorporating A Zoned Modifiable Textile Structure
US20100242151 *Sep 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article Of Apparel With Variable Air Permeability
US20110016603 *Jan 27, 2011Nike, Inc.Convertible Garment
US20140007314 *Sep 11, 2013Jan 9, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of apparel utilizing zoned venting and/or other body cooling features or methods
WO1988002603A1 *Oct 7, 1986Apr 21, 1988George B MuellerPlacket
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/115
International ClassificationA41B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41B1/00
European ClassificationA41B1/00