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Publication numberUS2846712 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1958
Filing dateOct 19, 1954
Priority dateOct 19, 1954
Publication numberUS 2846712 A, US 2846712A, US-A-2846712, US2846712 A, US2846712A
InventorsMoe Markman
Original AssigneeMiracle Strip Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tackless rug fastener means
US 2846712 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 12,1958 M. MARKMAN TACKLESS RUG FASTENER MEANS Fild Oct. 19, 1954 FIG.I

FIG.5

FIG.4

HHUUIHHIIIHIHHIWIIIII INVENTOR MOE MARKMAN mmmrmmm K ATTORNEY TACKLESS RUG FASTENER MEANS Moe Markman, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignr, by mesne assignments, to The Miracle Strip Corporation, Brooklyn, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application October 19, 1954, Serial No. 463,224

2 Claims. (Cl. 16-16) My invention relates to improvements in carpet fasteners and more particularly to that type of fasteners known as tackless carpet fasteners.

Heretofore there has been great diificulty encountered in fastening carpeting to the floor of a room by means of tackless fasteners because the strains and stresses encountered tend to cause the fasteners to loosen, pull out or bend releasing their grasp on the carpeting which must be held taut at all times.

The loosening of the heretofore known tackless carpet holders has been such a problem in the art that specially constructed ply woods have been devised in an attempt to keep the carpet fasteners in position under stress but until the present invention the problem has remained unsolved.

One of the objects of my invention is the provision of a carpet fastener of the tackless type which when embedded in a carrying strip will not shift or loosen its position under stress and will not cause a crushing of the fibers of the carrying strip.

Another object of my invention is to provide a carpet fastener which may be used in a variety of carrying strips thus bringing the cost of manufacture to a minimum since costly special woods are not necessary.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the specifications and drawings in which:

Fig. l is a front elevation of my invention before bending;

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the fastener shown in Fig. 1 after bending;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of my invention;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of a portion of the carrier with my invention imbedded therein;

Fig. 5 is a section taken on line 44 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of the complete assembly with my invention holding a rug in position.

Referring to the drawings, 6 represents my fastener in its entirety said fastener being constructed of metal or other suitable material. The fastener 6 is comprised of a top section 7 sharpened at 8 and a bottom section 9 sharpened at 10. Preferably the entire fastener is made by stamping out a piece of material tapered at both ends as at 11 and 12 the purpose of which will later be set forth. The double tapered piece of material is bent as shown in Figs. 2 and 3 to form a lazy 8 having top 7, platform 13 and bottom 9.

When bending the fastener I find it is preferable to bend the top 7 and bottom 9 at a 60 angle from the platform 13, although these angles are not critical, so that the top of bottom section 9 lies substantially below one end of platform 13 while the top section 7 lies substantially above the opposite end of paltform 13. It will be noted that the tapers of 7 and 9 are in opposite directions but these tapers may be rectangular and lie in the same plane although it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that by cutting the tapers as shown by Fig. 1, there is less waste material when numerous fasteners are die cut States Patent from a large sheet, therefore the exact form of the taper is not essential to the invention and'I do not wish to be restricted either by the angle of the bends or the shape of the taper. I

The completed taper 6 is forced into a thin strip of carrying material 14 such as wood, masonite or other suitable substance by forcing the bottom 9 through the carrying material upsetting or retrovertiug the bottom 9 at 15 and reintroducing taper tip 10 into the carrying strip 14 which is of suificient length, that it may be cut and laid along the edges of a room next to the base board 16 and fastened at intervals to the floor 17 by means of common fiat headed nails or brads 18.

Again I have described the preferred form of my invention by stating that the bottom section is retroverted and reintroduced into the carrier strip but it will be undersood that shortening the length of bottom portion 9 and driving it into the carrier strip will produce a fastener almost but not quite as good as the preferred form which is retroverted and reintroduced into the carrier strip.

After the carrying strip is attached to the floor, a mat 19 is fitted around the interior space whereupon the rug is laid over the mat and the carrying strip and stretched by forcing the upper portion 7 of fastener 6 into the woof and warp 20 of the rug to hold the rug firmly at all points around the edges of the room.

It will be noted that the length of the top portion 7 is determined by the thickness of the woof and Warp of the rug to be emplaced it being desirable to select a length which will pierce the woof and warp 20 but not protrude into the weft 21.

Operation From a blank piece of metal sharpened at its ends and formed as shown in Fig. 1, the top and bottom portion are bent by pliers or by a die forming machine so that there is formed thereby a top 7 and bottom 9 each at an angle of 60 to the middle of platform portion 13.

The bottom portion 9 is forced into and through a strip of carrying material 14 which may be composed of masonite, plywood or plain wood as desired. As the tip 10 emerges from the wood strip it is bent back or retroverted on itself by a die or any other tool, commonly known to those familiar in the art, so that tip 10 is re introduced and forced into the carrying strip by the formation of bend 15. These fasteners are placed in the wood strip at staggered intervals as shown by Fig. 4.

Referring to Fig. 6, it will now be seen that pressure exerted by the rug tending to pull the point 8 away from the base board 16 will be resisted by the fastener 6 because said pressure is transmitted to every part of the fastener, and platform 13 being broad cannot be forced into the carrying strip, also the hook formed by bend 15 and tip ltl cannot be forced out of the strip so that the entire fastener 6 remains in the carrier solidly and the fastener cannot either split or crush the carrier thus remaining firmly immobile.

While I have described the preferred form of my invention, certain changes may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope of my invention in which I claim.

I claim:

1. A carpet fastener of the character described, comprising a strip containing nails, said nails having substantially fiat top and bottom sections terminating in a point, said top and bottom sections being parallel each to the other and inclined to said strip and joined together at their central portion by a substantially fiat platform parallel to and in contact with said strip; said top section extending above said strip and adapted to engage a carpet and said bottom section embedded within said strip.

3 4 2. In a carpet fastener according to claim 1, said bot- 587,935 Crawford Aug. 10, 1897 tomsection passing through said strip then bent and 712,569 Myers Nov. 4, 1902 forced back into said strip. 1,623,465 Curtis Apr. 5, 1927 1,764,882 Newquist June 17, 1930 References Cited in the file of this patent 5 2 233 94 Roberts A 22 1941 UNITED STATES PATENTS 116,367 Sowle June 27, 1871 FOREIGN PATENTS 204,735 Housum June 11, 1878 19,722 Great Britain of 1902 539,469 Berry May 21, 1895 618,911 Great Britain Mar. 1, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US116367 *Jun 27, 1871 Improvement in double-headed and pointed dowel-brads
US204735 *May 16, 1878Jun 11, 1878 Improvement in rail-fence barbs
US539469 *Feb 7, 1894May 21, 1895 Daniel arthur berry
US587935 *Aug 10, 1897 Carpet-fastener
US712569 *Mar 25, 1902Nov 4, 1902Alfred Herman MyersCarpet-fastener.
US1623465 *Jul 27, 1926Apr 5, 1927Curtis George AClinching wire nail
US1764882 *Jun 11, 1927Jun 17, 1930Frederick NewquistGlazier's point
US2238946 *Apr 11, 1938Apr 22, 1941Roberts Roy MCarpet fastener
GB618911A * Title not available
GB190219722A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3000009 *Sep 28, 1959Sep 19, 1961Roberts CoMethod of making carpet grippers
US5203787 *Nov 19, 1990Apr 20, 1993Biomet, Inc.Suture retaining arrangement
US5464425 *Feb 23, 1994Nov 7, 1995Orthopaedic Biosystems, Ltd.Medullary suture anchor
US7601165Sep 29, 2006Oct 13, 2009Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for forming a self-locking adjustable suture loop
US7608092Feb 20, 2004Oct 27, 2009Biomet Sports Medicince, LLCMethod and apparatus for performing meniscus repair
US7608098Nov 9, 2004Oct 27, 2009Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcBone fixation device
US7658751Sep 29, 2006Feb 9, 2010Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod for implanting soft tissue
US7749250Feb 3, 2006Jul 6, 2010Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair assembly and associated method
US7857830Oct 9, 2007Dec 28, 2010Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair and conduit device
US7905903Nov 6, 2007Mar 15, 2011Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod for tissue fixation
US7905904Jan 15, 2008Mar 15, 2011Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair device and associated methods
US7909851Jan 15, 2008Mar 22, 2011Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair device and associated methods
US7914539Dec 5, 2005Mar 29, 2011Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcTissue fixation device
US7959650Aug 22, 2008Jun 14, 2011Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcAdjustable knotless loops
US8034090Mar 21, 2006Oct 11, 2011Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcTissue fixation device
US8088130May 29, 2009Jan 3, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8118836Aug 22, 2008Feb 21, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8128658Aug 22, 2008Mar 6, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US8137382Aug 22, 2008Mar 20, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for coupling anatomical features
US8221454Oct 27, 2009Jul 17, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcApparatus for performing meniscus repair
US8231654May 6, 2011Jul 31, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcAdjustable knotless loops
US8251998Feb 12, 2008Aug 28, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcChondral defect repair
US8273106Dec 22, 2010Sep 25, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair and conduit device
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US8298262Jun 22, 2009Oct 30, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod for tissue fixation
US8303604Sep 30, 2009Nov 6, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair device and method
US8317825Apr 7, 2009Nov 27, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue conduit device and method
US8337525Mar 11, 2011Dec 25, 2012Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair device and associated methods
US8343227May 27, 2010Jan 1, 2013Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Knee prosthesis assembly with ligament link
US8361113Jun 22, 2009Jan 29, 2013Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8409253Jul 1, 2010Apr 2, 2013Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair assembly and associated method
US8500818May 27, 2010Aug 6, 2013Biomet Manufacturing, LlcKnee prosthesis assembly with ligament link
US8506597Oct 25, 2011Aug 13, 2013Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for interosseous membrane reconstruction
US8551140Jul 13, 2011Oct 8, 2013Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to bone
US8562645May 2, 2011Oct 22, 2013Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for forming a self-locking adjustable loop
US8562647Oct 29, 2010Oct 22, 2013Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for securing soft tissue to bone
US8574235May 19, 2011Nov 5, 2013Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod for trochanteric reattachment
US8597327Nov 3, 2010Dec 3, 2013Biomet Manufacturing, LlcMethod and apparatus for sternal closure
US8608777Oct 21, 2011Dec 17, 2013Biomet Sports MedicineMethod and apparatus for coupling soft tissue to a bone
US8632569Dec 20, 2012Jan 21, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcSoft tissue repair device and associated methods
US8652171May 2, 2011Feb 18, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for soft tissue fixation
US8652172Jul 6, 2011Feb 18, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcFlexible anchors for tissue fixation
US8672968Feb 8, 2010Mar 18, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod for implanting soft tissue
US8672969Oct 7, 2011Mar 18, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcFracture fixation device
US8721684Mar 5, 2012May 13, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and apparatus for coupling anatomical features
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/16, 411/460
International ClassificationA47G27/00, A47G27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0462
European ClassificationA47G27/04C2T