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Publication numberUS2847548 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1958
Filing dateMay 28, 1957
Priority dateMay 28, 1957
Publication numberUS 2847548 A, US 2847548A, US-A-2847548, US2847548 A, US2847548A
InventorsJr Walter H Gordon, Robert A Wise
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vaporizer
US 2847548 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1953 w. H. GORDON, JR, ET AL 2,847,548

VAPORIZER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 28, 1957 1958 w. H. GORDON, JR, ET AL 2,847,548

VAPORIZER United States Patent VAPORIZER Walter H. Gordon, Jr., and Robert A. Wise, Asheboro,

N. C., assignors to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application May 28, 1957, Serial No. 662,256

11 Claims. (Cl. 21938) porizer with a liquid container of substantial volume and which has a liquid inlet structure limiting the amount of liquid entering the vaporization chamber.

A further object of this invention is to providea vaporizer having limited communication between the large volume of the liquid reservoir or container and the relatively small volume of liquid in the vaporization chamber.

In carrying out the objects of our invention in one formthereof, a liquid vaporizer includes a sealed liquidvesselof substantial capacity, with a container defining a steam vaporization chamber disposed within the liquid A heating element is mounted within the vavessel. porization chamber. The outer wall of the container is formed to define an inlet chamber, which in turn communicates with an internal liquid passageway. An inlet port into the vaporization chamber is provided from this passageway, displaced however, a substantial distance from the inlet chamber. Thus, a substantial labyrinth is provided between the outer liquid supply vessel and the inner vaporization chamber. Liquid level in the vaporization chamber is controlled by the admission of air into the sealed liquid supply vessel. further aspect of the invention, the air port opens into the inlet chamber for discharge of air into the outer vessel at a level corresponding to the desired liquid level in the vaporization chamber.

Other objects and advantages of our invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds, and the features of novelty which characterize our invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming part of this specification.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a sectional elevation taken along line 1--1 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 2 is a sectional plan view taken along line 2- -2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a wiring diagram of a control circuit that may be, used with this vaporizer;

Fig. 4 is an exploded perspective view, partially in section, illustrating components of the vaporization chamber;

Fig. 5 is an inverted perspective view of a portion of one of the components shown by Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6 is a partial perspective of the component shown by Fig. 5 from a different direction.

The vaporizer constituting the subject matter of this application is an improvement over the vaporizer disclosed and claimed in a separate application, Serial No. 662,255, filed concurrently herewith in the name of Walter H.

In accordance with a Gordon, Jr., entitled Vaporizer with Steam Generator.

Referring to the drawing, we have shown an embodiment of our invention wherein the vaporizer includes a vessel 1 of substantial volume; for example, one gallon. With such a large quantityv of water, however, it is desirable to provide a means for vaporizing the liquid which avoids heating the entire quantity of liquid in vessel 1 to the boiling point. Therefore, for this purpose, we have provided a vaporization chamber 2 adapted to be positioned within vessel 1. Within chamber 2 is a heating element 3 preferably comprising an electric heater resistor 4 sealed within an outer protective sheath 5', with electrical heater resistor 4 insulated from the outer sheath 5 in a well known manner.

In the particular form shown, chamber 2 consists of an inner container 6 and an outer container 7. separated by an insulating or air space 9. The inner container 6 of chamber 2 is tubular in shape and closed at the bottom thereof by bottom wall 6a.

at the bottom thereof by a cover member 8. Inner container 6 and outer container 7 along with air space 9 provide thermal insulation between chamber 2 and the liquid in vessel 1. Closure member 8 is secured to heat+ ing element 3 in any well known manner and as shown is held in place by a screw 10 which passes through closure member 8, the bottom of inner container 6 and through a clamp 11, so that the heating element is secured in place. As shown, outer container 7 of chamber 2 includes an outwardly extending flange 12 adapted to rest on the upper edge of vessel 1. Preferably, an appropriate sealing gasket 13 is interposed between flange 12 and the upper edge of vessel 1. The seal is eifected' by a clamping ring 14 secured to container '7 in any well known manner.

As shown in Fig. 1, a cover member 15 for outer shell 7 is provided with an extension 16 at one side thereof extending member 16 and flange 17 form a housing mem-- ber for'the control components of the vaporizer.

During operation of this vaporizer, liquid within the chamber 2 will be at the vaporization temperature, while liquid in the storage vessel 1 preferably remains near room temperature. With such a temperature differential, there is a substantial tendency for convection currents to establish continuous communication and flow between the outer vessel and the vaporization chamber, whereby in due course the entire quantity of liquid in vessel 1 is heated to a substantial degree. In accordance with this invention, means are provided to materially restrict liquid circulation between the vaporization chamber and the outer storage vessel, while permitting inlet flow into the vaporization chamber in accordance with demand.

The nature of this inlet system is shown most clearly by Figs. 4 through 6. As shown, the inner shell 6 for the vaporization chamber is adapted to be positioned within the bottom closure or cap 8, and typically, a bottom wall' 6a may complete the enclosure of the inner shell 6. The only opening into this inner shell is the restricted aperture 24, as shown in both Figs. 1 and 4. The outer shell 7 of the vaporization chamber encircling shell 6 is maintained in spaced relationship by an internal annular flange Outer container 7 of chamber 2 consists of a tubular member and is closed adapted to be received within the lower end of outer shell 7. Annular wall 20, as shown clearly by Fig. 4, is provided with a slot 22 to receive the walls defining the liquid inlet chamber of the outer shell and with a second slot 23 adapted to be aligned with inlet aperture 24 in the inner shell 6. This annular wall of the closure cap is spaced slightly from the inside wall of the outer shell, thus to define an annular liquid passage 21 through which incoming liquid may flow from slots 25 of the inlet chamber and through a substantial arc to slot 23 of the closure cap 8 and through inlet aperture or port in the inner shell. Thus, a labyrinth is provided for the incoming liquid from outer vessel 1 into the vaporization chamber.

This liquid supply system depends upon entry of air into outer vessel 1 to replace the liquid vaporized in the vaporization chamber. Air port 27 opening into the inlet chamber in the outer container has been provided for this purpose, and its conical shape facilitates passage of air bubbles from the annular air space 9 downwardly through aperture 27 into the outer vessel. It may be noted also that air port 27 opens into the upper portion of the inlet chamber, while grooves 25 communicate from the lower part of this chamber.

To fill the vaporizer with liquid prior to operation, the complete vaporization chamber assembly is removed. After vessel 1 has been filled to the proper level with liquid, the vaporization chamber assembly is inserted in vessel 1. While the complete vaporizer is being assembled, very little liquid will flow through grooves 25, around chamber 21 and through openings 23 and 24 into chamber 2. This is due to the configuration of the openings and channels communicating from vessel 1 to chamher 2. Very little water flows through air inlet 27 during assembly due to the restricted nature of inlet 27. When the vaporizer has been completely assembled and the proper seal between the vessel 1 and flange 12 has been established, a small amount of liquid flows into chamber 2 creating a partial vacuum within vessel 1 above the liquid level which limits entry of more liquid into chamber 2. The liquid flows into chamber 2 until it reaches a level slightly below that level defined by edge 26. The presence of air bubbles in port 27 prevents the water from ever rising in chamber 2 to a level defined by edge 26, When, due to vaporization, the liquid level in chamber 2 falls to a level below that previously defined, air is allowed to pass downwardly through the air space 9, port 27, and then bubbles into vessel 1. The downwardly diverging walls of port 27 facilitate transfer of air bubbles into the outer vessel. This entry of air into vessel 1 increases the pressure upon the liquid in vessel 1 and allows the liquid in chamber 2 to again rise to the level previously described. At no time during operation of the vaporizer will the liquid rise above that level, and therefore it can be seen that only a small amount of liquid will be allowed to be present in the vaporization chamber at any one time so that vaporization occurs almost instantly when the vaporizer is placed into operation, and continues at a nearly steady rate until the liquid in vessel 1 falls so low that no more liquid enters chamber 2.

Air port 27 has been made with downwardly diverging walls to facilitate passage of air bubbles from air space 9 to container 1. The top of port 27 is small to restrict water flow through port 27 from container 1 to the air space during assembly. It should be understood that port 27 can be made uniform throughout its length but we prefer to construct it in the manner shown to reduce the possibility that an air bubble would remain in the bottom thereof preventing further air from entering container 1, and thereby stopping liquid from entering chamber 2. It should also be understood that the water level in chamber 2 could be made to reach a level defined by edge 26. By enlarging the bottom of port 27 the water level in chamber 2 can be made to approach edge. 26 and actually be defined by edge 26.

In order to take advantage of full possibilities of the use of such a vaporizer, cover 15 is adapted to receive a medicament cup 28 having an opening 29 through which vapor passes from chamber 2 to the outside atmosphere. When this medicament cup is used, any suitable medicament can be placed in it so that vapor passing over it will carry the vaporized medicament throughout the room in which the vaporizer is being used.

The control shown in Fig. 3 may be used with this vaporizer although it forms no part of this invention but constitutes the subject matter of a separate application, Serial No. 652,254 filed concurrently herewith in the names of George C. Crowley, Walter H. Gordon, Ir., and Robert A. Wise, entitled Vaporizer Steam Dry Control, assigned to General Electric Company, assignee of the instant application. In the control circuit shown, heater resistor 4 is made from material which has a positive temperature coeflicient of resistance and is connected in series circuit relationship with a relay coil 30. An on" button 31 is provided to energize the circuit by closing relay contacts 32 and 33 which constitute a switch for the circuit. When the circuit is energized, core 34 will hold armature 35 down so as to keep contacts 32 and 33 closed. The relay consisting of coil 30 and core 34 is a current type relay. When the vaporizer boils dry, heater resistor 4 increases in temperature and therefore, its resistance increases. The increase in resistance reduces the current flowing through the circuit, and because the relay is the current type, this reduction in current flowing through the coil permits armature 35 to move away from core 34. Consequently, contacts 32 and 33 open the circuit. Also, an ofi button 36 is provided which can be used to manually open contacts 32 and 33 at any time desired.

While we have shown and described a specific embodiment of our invention, we do not desire our invention to be limited to the particular construction shown and described, and we intend by the appended claims to cover all modifications coming within the true spirit and scope of our invention.

What we claim :as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A vaporizer comprising: a liquid vessel; an inner container defining a vaporization chamber within said vessel; a heating element within said chamber; an outer container surrounding said chamber and enclosing an insulating space between said containers; sealing means between said outer container and said vessel; an aperture through said outer container adjacent the bottom thereof providing an air inlet for said vessel; a liquid passage; and a liquid inlet through said inner container angularly displaced from said aperture and in communication with said passage.

2. In a vaporizer including a liquid vessel; innerand outer containers separated by an air space, said inner container defining a vaporization chamber within said vessel; a heater element within said chamber and a seal between said outer container and said vessel; means providing liquid communication from said vessel into said vaporization chamber, said means comprising an inlet chamber formed in the wall of said outer container adjacent the bottom thereof; an air inlet opening into the top of said chamber through which air may pass into said vessel; a liquid inlet through walls defining said inlet chamber; a liquid passageway defined by walls of said inner and outer containers; and an inlet through said inner container spaced angularly from said inlet chamber.

3. A vaporizer comprising: a liquid vessel; inner and outer containers defining a vaporization chamber within said vessel; thermal insulation between said vessel and said chamber; aheating element within said chamber; sealing means between said vessel and said outer container; an inlet chamber formed in said outer container adjacent the bottom thereof providing an air inlet for said vessel and a liquid passage; and a liquid inlet through said inner container in communication with said passage; said air inlet defining the operating liquid level in said inner container.

4. A vaporizer comprising: a liquid vessel; a steam chamber within said vessel defined by inner and outer containers; a heating element within said inner container; thermal insulation between said inner and outer containers; sealing means between said vessel and said outer container; an inlet chamber formed in said outer container adjacent the bottom thereof providing an air inlet for said vessel and a liquid passage, said air inlet positioned adjacent the top of said inlet chamber being small and opening divergingly downward, said liquid passage positioned adjacent the bottom of said inlet chamber; and a liquid inlet through said inner container angularly displaced from said aperture and in communication with said passage.

5. A vaporizer comprising: a liquid vessel; an inner container defining a vaporization chamber within said vessel; a heating element within said chamber; an outer container surrounding said chamber and enclosing an insulating space therebetween; an aperture through said outer container adjacent the bottom thereof providing an air inlet for said vessel opening divergingly downward; and a liquid passage, said inlet being above said passage; and a liquid inlet through said inner container in communication with said passage.

6. A vaporizer comprising a liquid vessel; an inner container sealed within said vessel and defining a vaporization chamber; heating means within said chamber for converting the liquid to vapor; means defining an enclosed annular passage adjacent the lower portion of said container; "an inlet chamber having restricted communication with said annular passage; and a port providing communication from said annular passage into said vaporization chamber, said port being angularly displaced from said inlet chamber.

7. A vaporizer comprising a liquid vessel; an inner container sealed within said vessel and defining a vaporization chamber; heating means within said chamber for converting the liquid to vapor; means defining an en closed annular passage adjacent the lower portion of said container; an inlet chamber having restricted communication with said annular passage and providing an air inlet into said liquid vessel; and a port providing communication from said annular passage into said vaporization chamber, said port being angularly displaced from said inlet chamber.

8. A vaporizer comprising a liquid vessel; an inner container sealed within said vessel and defining a vaporization chamber; heating means within said chamber for converting the liquid to vapor; means defining an enclosed annular passage adjacent the lower portion of said container; an inlet chamber having restricted communication with said annular passage and providing an air inlet into said liquid vessel, said air inlet opening through the top wall of said inlet chamber; and a port providing communication from said annular passage into said vaporization chamber, said port being angularly displaced from said inlet chamber.

9. A vaporizer comprising a liquid vessel; an inner container sealed within said vessel and defining a vaporization chamber; heating means within said chamber for converting the liquid to vapor; means defining an enclosed annular passage adjacent the lower portion of said container; an inlet chamber having restricted communication With said annular passage and providing an air inlet into said liquid vessel, said air inlet opening through the top wall of said inlet chamber and being defined by walls converging inwardly and upwardly to a restricted aperture; and a port providing communication from said annular passage into said vaporization chamber, said port being angularly displaced from said inlet chamber.

10. A vaporizer comprising: a liquid vessel; an inner container sealed within said vessel and defining a vaporization chamber; insulating means between said chamber and said vessel; heating means within said chamber for converting the liquid to vapor; means defining an enclosed annular passage adjacent the lower portion of said container; an inlet chamber having restricted communication with said annular passage; and a port providing communication from said annular passage into said vaporization chamber, said port being angularly displaced from said inlet chamber.

11. In a vaporizer including a liquid vessel; inner and outer containers separated by an air space; a closure member for the bottom of said outer container having an upstanding annular well, said inner container defining a vaporization chamber within said vessel; a heater element within said chamber and a seal between said outer container and said vessel; means providing liquid communication from said vessel into said vaporization cham ber, said means comprising an inlet chamber formed in the wall of said outer container adjacent the bottom thereof; an air inlet opening into the top of said chamber through which air may pass into said vessel; a liquid inlet through walls defining said inlet chamber; a liquid passage defined by the walls of said outer container and said closure member; and an inlet through said inner container spaced angularly from said inlet chamber.

Hanks et a1. Oct. 1, 1935 Kuzmin et a1. Nov. 23, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2015672 *Apr 16, 1931Oct 1, 1935Hankscraft CompanyLiquid conductor heater
US2454657 *Oct 2, 1947Nov 23, 1948Walter R KuzminVaporizer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3085145 *Mar 9, 1960Apr 9, 1963Gen ElectricVaporizer
US3090857 *Nov 2, 1961May 21, 1963Walter J ObergVaporizer
US3282266 *Aug 2, 1962Nov 1, 1966Jr John M WalkerMethod and apparatus for humidifying inhalation mixtures
US3454745 *Sep 25, 1967Jul 8, 1969Knapp MonarchHeater for shaving lather containers
US3873806 *Oct 1, 1973Mar 25, 1975George W SchossowVaporizer-humidifier
US5761378 *Apr 13, 1995Jun 2, 1998Helen Of Troy LimitedHair curler steamer with PTC heater and thermally isolated cold and hot water reservoirs
US6080973 *Apr 19, 1999Jun 27, 2000Sherwood-Templeton Coal Company, Inc.Electric water heater
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/406, D23/362, 392/502, 219/510
International ClassificationF24H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24H1/00
European ClassificationF24H1/00