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Publication numberUS2847948 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1958
Filing dateMay 6, 1955
Priority dateMay 6, 1955
Publication numberUS 2847948 A, US 2847948A, US-A-2847948, US2847948 A, US2847948A
InventorsWilliam G Truitt
Original AssigneeWilliam G Truitt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composite roofing strip
US 2847948 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug: lg, 1958 w. G. TRulTT' 2,847,948

' coMPosITE RooFING sm!a Filed May 6. 1955 i ATTORNEYS v lNvEN-roR (ALM/A6, M.

United States Patent Ofiee 2,847,948 YPatented Aug. 19, 1958 2,847,948 COMPOSITE ROOFING-STRIP William G. Truitt, Philadelphia, lPa. Application May 6, 1955, Serial`No.-506,579 2 Claims. (Cil. 10S-6) This invention relates to improvements in roofing or siding materials and, `in particular, ,relates to a roofing essentially all metallic.

Another object of the invention .is to kprovide a cornpositejr'oong or siding strip having a base and a protective metallic sheet thereon which projects from one edge of the 4base so that when fafplurality of strips is fixed on a roof, the projected portion of one sheet is sealed with the sheet of an adjacent bottom strip, thereby sealing the base from exposure.

Another object of the invention is to provide a composite roong or siding strip having a base and a protective metallic sheet thereon, the base having a plurality of apertures to assist in fixing the sheath to the base and the base to the surface to be covered.

Another object of the invention is to provide a composite roofing or siding strip having a base and a protective metallic sheath thereon, the base and sheath being pliable so that the strip can be arranged in roll form for transportation and storage.

The preferred manner of constructing the invention will be described in connection with the drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective View showing a strip of the invention arranged in the form of a roll;

Figure 2 is a cross section of a roofing strip taken along the line 2 2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary view partially cut away showing another embodiment of the roofing strip of the invention; and

Figure 4 is a diagrammatic sectional view showing a plurality of strips arranged in a covering assembly on a roof.

In Figure 1 the strip is wound up in the form of a roll R and comprises a base 1 having fixed on the top surface thereof a metallic sheet 2. It will be apparent that when the roll R is unwound so that the strip lies flat, the base is generally rectangular in shape and the length, thereof, i. e., in the direction shown by the arrows 3, is substantially greater than the width as shown by the arrows 4. The metallic sheet is also rectangular in shape and preferably partially covers the top surface of the base l, the lengthwise edge 2a being spaced from the lengthwise edge 5 of the base a distance d in the order of 40 to 50% of the total width of the base. The lengthwise edge 6 of the sheet 2 is spaced from the lengthwise edge-7 fofgthebase to.formfa projected,v portion yl0, which is about-2 or 3% of the tota1-width kof the base 1. The sheet 2, preferably Vcovers the base 1 as between the widthwise edges.

Preferably the base 1 ismade of waterproof or waterresistant-material such 'as jute, glass wool, asbestos, rag, paper pulp fibers or the like,impregnated with a bituminous material such vas tar, asphalt or pitch. This type of base gives firm support forthe metal -sheet and is pliable so that the strip can be wound up in roll form. Where-the ybase isfmade from material other than that suggested, `it is essential that the base be pliable and capable of supporting the metallic strip.

It is preferable that the Vthickness-of the metal sheet used bein the foil class, i. e., '.0025-.005, inch thick, or, `ifnot'in that suggest-ed class, :be of a thickness or have a ductility such that the composite strip can be wound :up vinto .a roll. One metal which particularly satisfies this requirement `is aluminum. In addition, aluminum is npreferred becauseof its ability, when exposed -to the elements, to withstand deterioration and also becausefof its-ability to "resistpenetration of heat intothebuilding during the-summermonths andto conserve heatiinrthe building `during the fall and winter months.

Even though1the metal sheet may be in the foil class, I have vfound vthat where :the `base lis pliable and in the order of %4}," thick, a resilient effect is obtained which, `when'theroof `is 'walked'on, prevents damage to the metal sheet.

The aluminum s'heet'is secured .to the base preferably byfany good'mastic. 1For example, where a waterproof or water-resistant base as mentioned is used, the adhesive may comprise tar, asphalt or pitch. Other adhesives may be used, for example, adhesives having a rubber base with either a water, petroleum or resin vehicle. Other desirable mastics may be of the vegetable gum type such as cotton seed oil gum. Another known way of securing aluminum foil to a base made of material of the kind mentioned herein is to use foil which is pre-bonded on one side with kraft paper, the paper side then being secured to the base.

In Figure 3 I have shown a fragmentary view of a rooing strip which is constructed similarly as described except that the base 1' has a plurality of holes or perforations P extending therethrough. I have found that these perforations assist in strengthening the bond between the aluminum sheet and the base and also in strengthening the bond between the under surface of the -base and the roof surface to which the strip is applied.

In Figure 4 I have shown somewhat diagrammatically the manner in which the strips of the invention are applied to a roof. First, a starter grip 12 (which may be made of the same material as the base 1 mentioned above) is nailed or stapled to the lowermost section of the roof. Then a roll comprising the strip S-l is laid on the starter strip 12 and the section of the roof above the starter strip, this portion of the roof and the starter strip being previously coated (by brush or spray) with a mastic such as mentioned above. The projected portion 13 is pressed down on the mastic to overlap the starter strip. Thus the edge 14 of the base and edge 12 of the starter strip are isolated from the atmosphere. If desired, nails or staples may be applied along the top part of the strip not covered by the sheet, for holding the strip in place. A mastic is then applied along the upper portion of the strip and the roof as between the distance d-1 and then a roll comprising the strip S-2 unwound to the position as shown. For this latter operation, the metal sheet may be provided with a guide line as line l in Figure 1. Nails or staples are applied to the top area of the base and the projected portion is pressed down in the mastic to overlap the metal strip S-1 to seal off the edge 16. Preferably the strip S-2 is arranged on the strip S-1 such that there is an overlap between the base of S-Z and the metal sheet of S-1 as indicated at 17. The strips S-3, S-4 and S-S are applied in the same manner. The other side of the roof is then covered and terminates with the strip S-6. The apex of the roof is then coated with a mastic and a strip S-'l is applied. This sheet 19 which is arranged on the base such that there is an overlap on the opposite edges such as indicated at and 21.

Where the roong operation requires that the ends of two strips be interconnected, I prefer to overlap the ends of such adjacent strips and then cover the exposed portion 0f the base of the top strip with a sealing strip having a construction similar to that of S-7'. The sealing strip is supplied in roll form and preferably is two or three inches in width and cut to required length for the covering operation. The edges of the bases of the composite strips as laid on a roof as above-described are preferably protected from the atmosphere by laying along an edge of the roof a sealing strip such as mentioned above or, alternatively, rigid preformed pieces generally U-shaped in cross section can be used, these latter pieces being nailed to the edge of the roof.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the invention provides a composite roofing strip which, when manufactured, can be wound up in the form of a roll and, therefore, easily shipped and stored. From the description in connection with Figure 4, it will also be apparent that this roll-like form is highly conducive to simple and rapid application to a roof and that the collective disposition of the metal sheets presents an essentially latter strip comprises a base 18 and a metal 7 all-metallic surface which makes for long life and good insulating properties.

With regard to the strip S-7 mentioned above, it should be noted in passing that this type of strip is also useful for the covering of a ashing.

I claim:

1. A composite rooting or siding covering comprising: a pliable base which can be wound into roll form and unwound into strip form, the base, when unwound, being of generally lrectangular shape and being of substantially greater length than width; and a metal sheet fixed to one surface of said base, the sheet being pliable whereby it can be wound with the base into roll form and unwound into strip form, the sheet, when unwound, being of generally rectangular shape and substantially covering said surface between the widthwise edges and one lengthwise edge of the sheet being spaced inwardly -from the corresponding lengthwise edge of the base to form an uncovered area on the base and the other lengthwise edge of the sheet being spaced from the other lengthwise edge of the base to form a projected portion.

2. A construction in accordance with claim 1 wherein said metal sheet comprises aluminum foil.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 688,302 Grether Dec. 10, 1901 1,449,058 Robinson Mar. 20, 1923 1,551,318 Logan Aug. 25, 1925 1,663,565 Robinson Mar. 27, 1928 1,908,127 Deacon May 9, 1933 2,433,694 Heinning Dec. 30, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS v* 177,886 Switzerland Sept. 16, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US688302 *Aug 24, 1901Dec 10, 1901John GretherSheet-poster.
US1449058 *Jun 9, 1922Mar 20, 1923 Roofing element
US1551318 *Mar 13, 1922Aug 25, 1925 Method of manufacturing composite boofing
US1663565 *Aug 15, 1923Mar 27, 1928Anaconda Sales CoRoofing material
US1908127 *Jun 6, 1931May 9, 1933Metalfoils IncMetal sheathed roof
US2433694 *Jan 9, 1945Dec 30, 1947Walter J HeinningSheathing for buildings
CH177886A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3135069 *Dec 31, 1958Jun 2, 1964Erich KrebberRoofing
US3292334 *Jun 5, 1962Dec 20, 1966Lubrizol CorpRoofing element and roof surface
US3325589 *Nov 1, 1965Jun 13, 1967Dow Chemical CoThermal barriers for electric cables
US3549471 *Sep 14, 1967Dec 22, 1970Resilient Services IncLaminated materials for covering surfaces of buildings
US3771269 *Jul 8, 1971Nov 13, 1973Advance Housing CorpPrefabricated building and roof panel for same
US3811240 *May 30, 1972May 21, 1974Horny AReinforced aluminum shingle
US3812638 *Mar 8, 1973May 28, 1974Advance Housing CorpMethod of assembling a building
US3900102 *Jun 5, 1972Aug 19, 1975Grace W R & CoWaterproofing means and method
US3949657 *Apr 22, 1974Apr 13, 1976Sells Gary LVentilated cap for the ridge of a roof
US3950903 *Nov 12, 1973Apr 20, 1976Advance Housing CorporationRoof construction
US4622252 *Sep 29, 1982Nov 11, 1986Phillips Petroleum CompanyLaminate with plastic film
US5331783 *Jan 14, 1993Jul 26, 1994Liberty Diversified Industries, Inc.Ridge cap type roof ventilator
US5548940 *Nov 22, 1994Aug 27, 1996Baldock; Michael J.Rolled vinyl siding
US5636490 *Mar 28, 1996Jun 10, 1997Stocksieker; RichardRoof system
US7550187Jan 16, 2004Jun 23, 2009W. R. Grace & Co. -Conn.Moisture barrier membrane with tearable release liner composite
US7836654Aug 5, 2005Nov 23, 2010Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
US7861478Oct 30, 2007Jan 4, 2011Certainteed CorporationRoof membrane and roof system using the membrane to simulate a standing seam metal roof
US8015770Sep 16, 2010Sep 13, 2011Certainteed CorporationRoof membrane and roof system using the membrane to simulate a standing seam metal roof
US8156704Feb 28, 2011Apr 17, 2012Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Reducing humping of stacked roofing shingles
US8181413Sep 30, 2010May 22, 2012Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
US8230656Oct 7, 2010Jul 31, 2012Certainteed CorporationRoof membrane and roof system using the membrane to stimulate a standing seam metal roof
US8240102Aug 5, 2006Aug 14, 2012Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
US8430983Jul 29, 2011Apr 30, 2013Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcMethod of manufacturing a shingle with reinforced nail zone
US8557366Apr 3, 2006Oct 15, 2013Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcRoofing shingle including sheet as headlap
US8607521Apr 29, 2011Dec 17, 2013Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
US8623164Feb 28, 2011Jan 7, 2014Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
US8689510 *Mar 27, 2012Apr 8, 2014Aaron G. KrumviedaRoofing system and method
US8713883Apr 23, 2012May 6, 2014Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with impact resistant layer
US8752351Dec 13, 2013Jun 17, 2014Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/189, 428/191, 428/906, 52/554, 52/556, 428/440, 52/518
International ClassificationE04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, Y10S428/906
European ClassificationE04D1/26