Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2847997 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1958
Filing dateJan 13, 1956
Priority dateJan 13, 1956
Publication numberUS 2847997 A, US 2847997A, US-A-2847997, US2847997 A, US2847997A
InventorsJames J Tibone
Original AssigneeJames J Tibone
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Catheter
US 2847997 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Allg 19 1958 J. J. 'rlBoNE 2,847,997

CATHETER Filed Jan. 1s, 195e ATTORNEYS 2,847,997- CATHETER JamesJ. Tibone, Rockville Centre, N. Y. Applviariqn January 1a, 1956,'seria1No. 558,939.

9 claims. (Cl. 12s-325) This invention relates to a catheter and more particularly to a` catheter to be inserted into a nasal passage for applying hemostatic agents to the throat region. The` end of the catheter is .specially designed to exert appropria-te pressure upon the area of the throat intended for treatment.

Heretofore, there has not been available a catheter for use to stop post-operative adenoids hemorrhage eX- cept in one instance. Prior tothe. advent of the present invention, it was rthe, practice to ,insert a rubberl Catheter, into one of the nostrils of the patient undergoingtreatment until it became exposed in the throat `area and could be seen through the mouth and grasped. In order to complete the pressure pack, a cord Iholding .a gauze tampon was then tied to the catheter and the catheter pulled out carrying the cord until the tampon rested snugly against the raw bleeding surface.

Although this technique for treating a post-operative adenoids hemorrhage has proven satisfactory, nevertheless,.it is subject to la number of disadvantages, For one reason, lthe technique requires too much manipulation and thus could :cause discomfort to the patient and for a second reason the pressure exerted on lthe gauze tampon necessarily is transferred or originates from the opening to the nostril. In order to avoid these difficulties and to provide a catheter which will perform the desired functions expediently and eiciently, the catheter of the present invention was developed.

Accordingly, it is an yobject of -the present invention to provide a novel catheter to be employed to stop postoperative adenoids hemorrhages which is -simple in design and construction and more important extremely simple in use.

Other and further objects of the present invention will become more readily apparent upon an inspection of the drawings when taken in conjunction with the following detailed description.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a view in section through a human head showing the catheter in use;

Figure 2 is a view in elevation showing the catheter of the invention;

Figure 3 is a view in elevation similar to Figure 2; and

Figure 4 is a view in section showing a modied form of lthe invention.

As will be evident from Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings, the catheter consists essentially of a tube open at one end and closed at the other end by a soft rubber bulb 11 which can be inflated. Coated or laminated to the outer surface of the bulb 11 is a thin layer of gauze-like material 12 impregnated with a hemostatic chemical. The catheter can be composed of a rubber component or of polyethylene possessing the requisite body or stiffness and should be of a relatively small diameter in order not to cause discomfort to the patient undergoing the treatment.

In use, the catheter of the present invention, with the bulb 11 fully deflated (Figure 2), is inserted into one nostril until it strikes the back of the throat (see Figure nited States Patent() M 2,847,997 Patented Aug. 19, 1958 ICC that its position will be retained and Vthe bulb 1,1'will` remain iniiated.

As will be evident, the catheter, asabove described, is extremely` easy to apply and can as easilyv be. removed.

Further, it is more comfortable forthepatient since the.

pressure required originates, so to. speak, directly, at the point to which it is to be applied. For these reasons, it. has been found that the catheter of the present invention can be removed several hours earlie'rthan could the gauze tampon which has previously been used for this purpose and thus, the possibility of infection is lessened tofa marked degree.

There is"4 illustrated in Figure 4 a further embodiment of the` Ipresent: invention. In this embodiment, a main catheter 20 is provided open at one end and closed at its other by a'bulb 2 1. The open end is provided with a clamping `means 22 which permits this end to be closed. Projecting through the wall of the tube 20` is a second tube 23 which passes through tube 20 and through the bulb 21 terminating a short distance beyond the surface of the bulb 21. In this arrangement the bulb 21 is punctured or otherwise fashioned to dene a suitable hole through which the tube 23 extends. It is preferred that the bulb 21 be bonded by some means to the tube 23 in order to effectively maintain the relative positions of the parts. A layer of gauze 24 is bonded or laminated to the outside surface of the bulb 21. The gauze layer is preferred to be about ls" thick, although this dimension may vary within limits. In a preferred form of the present invention, it is most desirable to employ a material known as OXycel gauze, a composition prepared by the Parke- Davis Company. This material has excellent hemostatic properties, but is quite soft and fragile and cannot be boiled. This makes it extremely diflicult to attach this material directly to the bulb 21 and accordingly it is proposed to combine this material with conventional gauze and to attach the combination to the bulb 21. If the use of Oxycel gauze is not feasible in certain circumstances, it is quite possible to employ regular gauze and to soak it with a hemostatic agent prior to using the catheter. The catheter, can be composed of either polyethyleneor rubber, both materials being suitable. The smaller catheter 23 extends beyond the surface of the bulb 21 as previously explained and as indicated by the numeral 25.

It is significant, however, that the end of tube 23 does not extend beyond the surface of the bulb 21 a dimension greater than the thickness of the gauze layer. In fact, if the gauze layer be about 1A" thick, then it is preferred that the smaller tube 23 extend about 3&6 beyond the bulb 21. When arranged in this fashion, medicine such as hemostatic substances, astringents or antiseptics can be introduced into the tube 23 and will flow out of tube 23 into gauze layer 24.

As will be readily apparent, the catheter described above provides a unique method of placing liquid medicine on the gauze layer 24 without the necessity of the medicine coming into contact with areas not desired to be treated. Since some hemostatic agents and astringent are caustic, the catheter of the present invention provides a unique means for directing them to the areas desired to be treated while avoiding passing the hemostatic agents over areas where their action is not desired.

Although the present invention has been shown and described with reference to specific embodiments, never- 3 theless, various changes and modiications Obvious to one skilled in the art are within the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A catheter to be inserted into a nasal passage cornprising an elongated tube of relatively small diameter composed of a relatively stii non-injurious material, an inatable bulb of soft, resilient material closing one end of said tube, and a layer of a gauze-like material capable of being impregnated with a therapeutic agent adhered to the outside surface of said bulb and capable of expanding with said bulb when inated.

2. A catheter as defined in claim 1 wherein said bulb is composed of a soft rubber compound.

3. A catheter as defined in claim 1 wherein said tube is composed of a material selected from the group consisting of rubber compounds and polyethylene.

4. A catheter as dened in claim l which further includes means for clamping olf the open end of said tube.

5. A catheter to be inserted into a nasal passage comprising an elongated tube, a bulb of soft resilient material closing one end of said tube, a layer of a gauze-like material capable of being impregnated with a therapeutic agent adhered to the outside surface of said bulb, a second elongated tube received within said first-mentioned tube and having one end thereof projecting through said bulb a distance less than the thickness of said layer whereby therapeutic agents introduced into said second tube will impregnate said layer of gauze-like material.

6. A catheter as defined in claim 5 wherein said second elongated tube projects through the wall of said first mentioned tube at a point remote from said bulb.

7. A catheter as dened in claim 5 which further includes means for clamping olf the open end of said first mentioned tube.

8. A catheter as defined in claim 5 wherein said bulb is composed of a soft rubber compound.

9. A catheter as defined in claim 5 wherein said tubes are composed of a material selected from the group consisting of rubber compounds and polyethylene.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,922,084 Gerow Aug. 15, 1933 2,090,354 Massman Aug. 17, 1937 2,490,168 Strauss Dec. 6, 1949 2,493,326 Trinder Jan. 3, 1950 2,647,515 Pollock Aug. 4, 1953 2,677,375 Raiche May 4, 1954 OTHER REFERENCES Surgery, Gynecology, and Obstetrics, vol. 77, #4, October 1943, pages 422, 425, 128, 349.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1922084 *Apr 24, 1931Aug 15, 1933Charles A StephensSelf retaining catheter and drainage tube
US2090354 *May 14, 1936Aug 17, 1937Massman Abraham ECombined medicine dropper and swab
US2490168 *Feb 21, 1947Dec 6, 1949Strauss Oscar ASinus medication applicator
US2493326 *Mar 1, 1949Jan 3, 1950John H TrinderTampon for control of intractable nasal hemorrhages
US2647515 *Aug 20, 1951Aug 4, 1953Professional Supply IncInflatable dam for arresting bleeding in the internal body cavities
US2677375 *Nov 16, 1951May 4, 1954Davol Rubber CoCatheter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2927584 *Apr 16, 1958Mar 8, 1960American Cystoscope Makers IncMeans for anchoring a surgical device and a surgical drain embodying the same
US3154077 *Jun 4, 1962Oct 27, 1964Joseph P CannonHemostatic device for anal surgery
US3168092 *Jun 15, 1961Feb 2, 1965Silverman DanielMedical probing instrument having flexible, extrudable tubing adapted to be extraverted under pressure into a body cavity
US3283343 *Nov 16, 1964Nov 8, 1966Gurdon S WorcesterDisposable pillow
US3348542 *Dec 2, 1964Oct 24, 1967Richard R JacksonAnesthetic articles
US3420237 *Sep 2, 1966Jan 7, 1969Martha K FortayProcess and article for the treatment of severe epistaxis
US3570494 *Dec 16, 1968Mar 16, 1971George H GottschalkNasal tampon
US4504270 *Mar 30, 1983Mar 12, 1985Miller Roscoe EEnema apparata improvements relating to double contrast studies
US4820266 *Jan 27, 1988Apr 11, 1989Berry Yale JMethod of stopping nose bleeds
US4883465 *May 24, 1988Nov 28, 1989Brennan H GeorgeNasal tampon and method for using
US5011474 *May 2, 1989Apr 30, 1991Brennan H GeorgeMethods for controlling nasal hemorrhaging
US5308327 *Nov 25, 1991May 3, 1994Advanced Surgical Inc.Self-deployed inflatable retractor
US5312430 *Jun 28, 1991May 17, 1994Rosenbluth Robert FFor restoring patency to a collapsed portion of the urethra
US5337754 *Sep 1, 1993Aug 16, 1994Advanced Surgical, Inc.Inflatable isolation bag
US5524633 *Oct 1, 1993Jun 11, 1996Advanced Surgical, Inc.Self-deploying isolation bag
US5527336 *Mar 2, 1995Jun 18, 1996Boston Scientific CorporationMethod of treating the symptoms of a flow obstruction of a urethra
US5752971 *Jun 5, 1995May 19, 1998Boston Scientific Technology, Inc.Method of treating a flow obstruction
US5836951 *Jun 7, 1995Nov 17, 1998Boston Scientific CorporationBalloon dilation catheter
US6027478 *Oct 9, 1997Feb 22, 2000Medical Purchasing Group, Inc.Nasal cavity drainage and stoppage system
US6306154 *Sep 27, 1999Oct 23, 2001Bhk HoldingHemostatic system for body cavities
US7018392Nov 28, 2001Mar 28, 2006Arthrocare CorporationHemostatic system for body cavities
US7611477Jul 11, 2007Nov 3, 2009William A. DayhoffToe lift strap
US7799048May 4, 2001Sep 21, 2010Arthrocare CorporationNasal packing device
US8080000Oct 30, 2007Dec 20, 2011Acclarent, Inc.Methods and apparatus for treating disorders of the ear nose and throat
US8088101Oct 26, 2007Jan 3, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating disorders of the ear, nose and throat
US8090433Oct 30, 2007Jan 3, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Methods and apparatus for treating disorders of the ear nose and throat
US8100933May 8, 2008Jan 24, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Method for treating obstructed paranasal frontal sinuses
US8114062Oct 1, 2009Feb 14, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Devices and methods for delivering therapeutic substances for the treatment of sinusitis and other disorders
US8114113Oct 4, 2005Feb 14, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Multi-conduit balloon catheter
US8118757Apr 30, 2007Feb 21, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Methods and devices for ostium measurement
US8123722Oct 29, 2007Feb 28, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating disorders of the ear, nose and throat
US8137375Aug 24, 2010Mar 20, 2012Arthrocare CorporationNasal packing device
US8142422Mar 4, 2008Mar 27, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for diagnosing and treating sinusitis and other disorders of the ears, nose and/or throat
US8146400Jul 31, 2007Apr 3, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Endoscopic methods and devices for transnasal procedures
US8172828Oct 30, 2007May 8, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Apparatus and methods for dilating and modifying ostia of paranasal sinuses and other intranasal or paranasal structures
US8182432Mar 10, 2008May 22, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Corewire design and construction for medical devices
US8190389May 17, 2006May 29, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Adapter for attaching electromagnetic image guidance components to a medical device
US8317816Sep 30, 2002Nov 27, 2012Acclarent, Inc.Balloon catheters and methods for treating paranasal sinuses
US8388642Aug 29, 2008Mar 5, 2013Acclarent, Inc.Implantable devices and methods for treating sinusitis and other disorders
US8414473Sep 16, 2009Apr 9, 2013Acclarent, Inc.Methods and apparatus for treating disorders of the ear nose and throat
US8425457Dec 29, 2009Apr 23, 2013Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for diagnosing and treating sinusitus and other disorder of the ears, nose and/or throat
US8435290Mar 24, 2010May 7, 2013Acclarent, Inc.System and method for treatment of non-ventilating middle ear by providing a gas pathway through the nasopharynx
US8439687Dec 29, 2006May 14, 2013Acclarent, Inc.Apparatus and method for simulated insertion and positioning of guidewares and other interventional devices
US8485199May 8, 2007Jul 16, 2013Acclarent, Inc.Methods and devices for protecting nasal turbinate during surgery
US8702626Dec 29, 2006Apr 22, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Guidewires for performing image guided procedures
US8715169Oct 30, 2007May 6, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods useable for treating sinusitis
US8721591Jan 23, 2012May 13, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Apparatus and methods for dilating and modifying ostia of paranasal sinuses and other intranasal or paranasal structures
US8740929Feb 6, 2002Jun 3, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Spacing device for releasing active substances in the paranasal sinus
US8747389Apr 24, 2007Jun 10, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Systems for treating disorders of the ear, nose and throat
US8764709Jun 30, 2010Jul 1, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating disorders of the ear, nose and throat
US8764726Aug 18, 2009Jul 1, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods useable for treating sinusitis
US8764729Dec 22, 2008Jul 1, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Frontal sinus spacer
US8764786Oct 9, 2012Jul 1, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Balloon catheters and methods for treating paranasal sinuses
US8777926Mar 15, 2013Jul 15, 2014Acclarent, Inc.Apparatus and methods for dilating and modifying ostia of paranasal sinuses and other intranasel or paranasal structures
EP1744708A2 *Apr 21, 2005Jan 24, 2007Acclarent, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for diagnosing and treating sinusitus and other disorders of the ears, nose and/or throat
WO2002047558A1 *Nov 21, 2001Jun 20, 2002Alberto BauerHemostatic device
WO2005117755A2Apr 21, 2005Dec 15, 2005Exploramed Nc1 IncDevices, systems and methods for treating sinusitius
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/196, 604/11, 604/104, 604/907, 604/275
International ClassificationA61M31/00, A61B17/12
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/12104, A61M31/00, A61B17/12136, A61B17/24
European ClassificationA61B17/12P7B, A61B17/12P5A, A61M31/00