Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2848079 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1958
Filing dateJul 15, 1957
Priority dateJul 15, 1957
Publication numberUS 2848079 A, US 2848079A, US-A-2848079, US2848079 A, US2848079A
InventorsMeyer Brodie
Original AssigneeMeyer Brodie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stitch concealing binding for luggage
US 2848079 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 19, 1958 M. BRODIE STITCH CONCEALING BINDING FOR LUGGAGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 15, 1957 INVENTOR. Mayer Brodie Aug. 19, 1958 M. BRODIE STITCH CONCEALING BINDING FOR LUGGAGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 15, 1957 INVENTOR: Meyer firm 1'8 AJTORNE United States Patent STITCH CON CEALING BINDING FOR LUGGAGE Meyer Brodie, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Application July 15, 1957, Serial No. 671,822

Claims. (Cl. 190--54) This invention relates generally to the art of luggage manufacture, and more particularly has reference to a binding assembly for a valise, suitcase, or similar piece of luggage.

It is a common manufacturing practice, in the manufacture of luggage of the ype having rigidly constituted Walls, to form said Walls with a main portion that may be of a heavy fibrous stock or other material having the requisite characteristics of rigidity and strength. Then, said stock is covered by a fabric covering piece or the like, which is cemented or otherwise secured to the surface of the wall of the luggage, so as to completely cover the same and impart an attractive, ornamental appearance thereto while at the same time protecting the surface of the wall.

The covering pieces are so designed that adjacent edges of said pieces present a rather unattractive appearance, if not covered by a suitable binding, and one object of the present invention is to provide an improved binding means for protectively overlying adjacent, abutting or overlapping edges of the fabric covering pieces.

Another object, in a binding of the character described, is to form saidbinding from a transparent channel structure in which is disposed a flexible binding element, which element may be suitably colored, with the colors of the element appearing through the transparent material of the retaining channel structure.

Another object is to so form said retaining channel structure as to facilitate its being stitched or otherwise fixedly secured to the wall of the luggage, in a position completely overlyingthe abutting or overlapping edges of the fabric coverings, the retaining channel when so mounted having walls that are spreadable resiliently to receive the binding element.

Another object is to provide a binding means of the character described which will act as a buffer or bumper device, adapted to receive shocks and absorb the same, thus to add to the life of the luggage.

Still another object is to so locate the binding means that it will protect the surface of the fabric covering on the end, top and bottom walls of the valise or similar piece of luggage.

Still another object is to so form the binding means as to permit the same to be attached to the luggage easily and at a relatively low cost, by following conventional manufacturing practices that are particularly designed to permit the manufacture of a large number of pieces of luggage in a comparatively short time, that is, by mass production methods.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularl set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a valise or similar piece 2,848,079 Patented Aug. 19, 1958 of luggage made according to the present invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged transverse sectional view substantially on line 2-2 of Fig. 1, showing the laterally spaced binding means in cross section.

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view on-the same cutting plane as Fig. 2, still further enlarged, through one of the binding means, the channel of said means being shown in full and dotted lines in its molding-gripping and spread positions, respectively.

Fig. 4 is a side elevational view, on a scale reduced below that of Fig. 1, of the valise.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary, exploded perspective view of the binding means and the adjacent portion of the valise, on substantially the same scale as Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view through one of the binding assemblies, substantially on line 6-6 of Fig. 1, on approximately the same scale as Fig. 3, showing the joint of the molding element.

Fig. 7 is a view like Fig. 6 taken at another location along the length of the binding assembly, showing the joint between adjacent ends of the channeled retaining strip.

Fig. 8 is a view like Fig. 3 showing a modified construction.

Referring to the drawings in detail, designated generally at 10 is a valise. Essentially, this is of basically conventional shape and construction, in the sense that it includes confronting, hingedly connected sections generally designated at 12, 14, respectively. Said sections (see Fig. 2) include side walls 16, 18, respectively, of the respective sections, disposed in parallel planes. The respective side walls are integral with inwardly projecting flange portions 20, 22, respectively having a shiplapped oint 24 when the valise is closed, said flanges being hingedly connected at the bottom of the valise, in the usual manner. The flange portion 20 is greater in width than the flange portion 22, so that the joint 24 is offset to one side of a vertical plane parallel to the planes of the walls 16, 18 and bisecting the valise.

The valise is provided with the usual handle 26, which may be secured to the top part of the flange portion 20, in closely, laterally spaced relation to the joint 24 between the respective sections. Adjacent opposite ends of the valise, conventional latches 27 are provided.

All this is, per se, conventional and does not constitute part of the present invention. In manufacture of luggage of this type, the Walls 16, 18, and the flange portions 20, 22 that are integral therewith, can be formed of a heavy fibrous stock, such as a thick, strong cardboard, and this material is then covered with an attractive, strong, flexible facing piece of fabric or the like. Thus, the sec- U011 10 is entirely covered with fabric, that is, the wall 16 15 covered with a fabric piece 28, while wall 18 is covered with fabric as at 30. Flange portions 20, 22 are covered with strips of fabric 32, 34, respectively, between the joint 24 and the rounded, integral connections between the flange portions and their associated walls 16 or 18 as the case may be.

In any event, in a valise of the type referred to, the fabric strips 28, 32 must be covered with a binding, so that the joint between said fabric coverings will not be seen. The same is true of the joint between the fabric coverings 30, 34. In each instance, it is desirable to provide a binding strip assembly, which assembly not only serves to protectively overlie and seal the joint between the adjacent fabric pieces, but also serves to provide a buffer which will strike any object against which the valise may be brought, to prevent damage to the facing material of the valise. This is true whether the valise is permitted to rest upon the supporting surface,

adjacent fabric strips.

3 or whether on the other hand it is being carried in the hand.

In any event, in accordance with the present invention, the binding means 40 overlying each joint between adjacent fabric pieces is identical, at opposite sides of the handle 26. Therefore, the description of one binding means 40 will sutfice for both.

It will thus be seen that in accordance with the present invention, the binding means includes a transparent, plastic channel structure 42 extending continuously through the full periphery of the valise, that is, continuously along the bottom, ends, and top of the valise, in a position in which said channel 42 overlies the joint between As will be noted, the joint between fabric coverings 28, 32 has been designated at 36, with said coverings being in overlapped relation as shown in Fig. 3. Similarly, the joints between the coverings 30, 34 has been designated at 38. r

The continuous, transparent, plastic channel structure 42 has side walls 44 which are preformed to converge in a direction away from the flat web of the retaining strip or channel 42, when said retaining strip is shown in cross section as in Fig. 3. The side walls 44, by reason of the inherent characteristics of the plastic material, are tensioned to remain in the upwardly converging position in which they are shown in full lines in Fig. 3. However, against the restraint of the inherent springability of said side walls, they may be sprung apart to the dotted line positions of Fig. 3, that is, they may be spread to positions in which they diverge outwardly from the web of the retaining strip, when said retaining strip is seen in cross section.

The binding means, including the retaining strip 42, is in overlying relation to the joints between the fabric coverings, in both forms of the invention shown in Figs. 3 and 8, respectively. Thus, in the Fig. 8 form of the invention, adjacent coverings 28 32 are identical to coverings 28, 32, with the exception that they have closely spaced, adjacent edge portions 36*, rather than overlapping edge portions 36, the edge portions 36 being'in a common plane and being spaced apart only sufliciently to permit stitching 46 to be extended through the space, and through the web of theretaining strip 42, said stitching following the longitudinal median of the retaining strip and extending continuously through the full periphery of the valise.

The binding means includes, in addition to the retaining strip, a resiliently deformable binding element 48, which is of solid cross section, having a flat bottom surface in face-to-face contact with the web of the retaining strip, and having a transversely, upwardly arched top surface when seen in cross section, so that the flanges or lips 44 of the retaining strip will be in embracing, overhanging relation to the opposite side edge portions of the binding element 48, thereby to hold the binding element in place within the channeled retaining strip. The retaining strip is transparent as previously noted, but the binding element will be colored to harmonize with the color of the fabric covering of the valise, the color of the binding element being seen directly through the transparent retaining strip.

By reason of this construction, it will be seen that the side walls or flanges 44 may be sprung apart, to permit the binding element 48 to be seated in the channeled retaining strip. Thereafter, on release of the side walls, they spring into gripping relation to the binding element 48. Obviously, cement or adhesive may be employed to assure a permanent bond between the binding element 48 and the channeled retaining strip.

In Fig. 3 it is shown that stitching 50 extends through the overlapping edge portions 38, to connect the abutting edges of the fabric coverings together while at the same time connecting to the fabric coverings the overlying retaining strip. Then, when the binding element 48 is engaged in the retaining strip, the construction is completed, with the binding element projecting outwardly beyond the outer longitudinal edges of the flanges 44 to constitute a comparatively soft, resilient bumper means in the event the valise is brought up against a hard surface that would otherwise tend to damage the same.

The arrangement has the desirable characteristic of not only concealing and completely protecting the joint between adjacent fabric covering portions, but also, of preventing said fabric portions from moving out of proper position. Still further, the arrangement at the same time has the effect of ornamenting the luggage and also of protecting the luggage at the ends, bottom, and top, at both sides of the handle 26.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent 1s:

1. In a valise construction the combination, with a pair of hingedly connected valise sections each including a body composed of a peripheral flange and a pair of side-by-side coverings overlying the flange, of a binding assembly for each flange comprising a retainer strip of resilient material overlying adjacent edges of the coverings and secured to the sections, said strip being channeled so as to include a web and side walls projecting from the web, and a binding element engaged in said strip, the side walls of the retainer strip being resiliently tensioned to normally springably move toward each other into embracing relation to said binding element.

2. In a valise construction the combination, with a pair of hingedly connected valise sections each including a peripheral flange and a pair of side-by-side coverings overlying the flange, of a binding assembly for each flange comprising a retainer strip of resilient material overlying adjacent edges of the coverings, said strip being channeled so as to include a web and side walls projecting from the web, and a binding element engaged in said strip, the side walls of the retainer strip being resiliently tensioned to normally springably move toward each other into embracing relation to said binding element, said binding element being of a soft material so as to be compressed by and between said side walls, said web being permanently secured to the flange to engage the adjacent edges of the coverings against the flange, between theweb and the flange.

3. In a valise construction the combination, with a pair of hingedly connected valise sections each including a peripheral flange and a pair of side-by-side coverings overlying the flange, of a binding assembly for each flange comprising a retainer strip of resilient material overlying adjacent edges of the coverings and secured to the sections, said strip being channeled so as to include a web and side walls projecting from the web, and a binding element engaged in said strip, the side walls of the retainer strip being resiliently tensioned to normally springably move toward each other into embracing relation to said binding element, said retainer strip and binding element extending continuously through the full periphery of the section.

4. In a valise construction the combination, with ,a pair of hingedly connected valise sections each including a peripheral flange and a pair of side-by-side coverings overlying the flange, of a binding assembly for each flange comprising a retainer strip of resilient material overlying adjacent edges of the coverings and secured to the sections, said strip being channeled so as to include a web and side walls projecting from the web, and a binding element engaged in said strip, the side walls of the retainer strip being resiliently tensioned to normally springably move toward each other into embracing relation 5 to said binding element, said retainer strip and binding element extending continuously through the full periphery of the section, the binding eleznent including ends in abutting relation and the retainer strip also including ends in abutting relation, said ends of the binding element being complementarily beveled.

5. In a valise construction the combination, with a pair of hingedly connected valise sections each including a peripheral flange and a pair of side-by-side coverings overlying the flanges, of a binding assembly for each flange comprising a retainer strip of resilient material overlying adjacent edges of the coverings, said strip being channeled so as to include a web and side walls projecting from the web, and a binding element engaged in said strip, the side walls of the retainer strip being resiliently tensioned to normally springably move toward each other into embracing relation to said binding element, said binding element being of a soft material so References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,908,671 Hossfeld May 9, 1933 2,049,501 Herron Aug. 4, 1936 2,695,691 Finkelstein Nov. 30, 1954 2,765,888 Finkelstein Oct. 9, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1908671 *Oct 10, 1931May 9, 1933Monarch Trunk CompanyMethod of and means for covering hand luggage
US2049501 *Nov 2, 1931Aug 4, 1936Anna L HerronMolding
US2695691 *Oct 28, 1953Nov 30, 1954William FinkelsteinLuggage handle
US2765888 *May 28, 1954Oct 9, 1956William FinkelsteinLuggage handle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2950793 *Jan 9, 1959Aug 30, 1960Shwayder Bros IncLuggage case
US3477553 *Jun 21, 1967Nov 11, 1969Atlantic Prod CorpLuggage having a zipper closure
US3741355 *Jun 29, 1970Jun 26, 1973Dominion Luggage Co LtdSoft sided luggage case
US4163484 *Apr 18, 1978Aug 7, 1979Delaney John HCombination luggage protector and spotter
US4784248 *Aug 31, 1987Nov 15, 1988Samsonite CorporationPiping for luggage and the like
US20040069584 *Oct 10, 2002Apr 15, 2004Chen-Chuan WuAngular construction of luggage cabinet
Classifications
U.S. Classification190/126
International ClassificationA45C5/00, A45C5/02
Cooperative ClassificationA45C5/02
European ClassificationA45C5/02