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Publication numberUS2848950 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1958
Filing dateNov 4, 1955
Priority dateNov 4, 1955
Publication numberUS 2848950 A, US 2848950A, US-A-2848950, US2848950 A, US2848950A
InventorsDonaldson James B
Original AssigneeDonaldson James B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy caps
US 2848950 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1958 J. B. DONALDSON 2,848,950

TOY CAPS Filed Nov. 4, 1955 lnvmbor' ww, orrwys United States Patent Gfiice 2,848,950 Patented Aug. 26, 1958 TOY CAPS James B. Donaldson, Cooksville, Ontario, Canada Application November 4, 1955, Serial No. 545,053

3 Claims. (Cl. 102-865) This invention relates to toy caps for cap pistols and the like and to a method of making such caps.

The conventional method of making toy caps is to apply spaced deposits of the explosive composition to a base sheet. The deposits of explosive composition must be carefully dried. A thin sheet of tissue is then coated with an adhesive and applied to the base sheet with pressure to adhere the sheets together. The consolidated sheet is afterwards divided into strips which are wound into rolls.

The foregoing procedure is subject to disadvantages in that there is a considerable danger of an explosion and there are delays and difficulties in carrying out the procedure. The explosive composition is mixed with a liquid such as water before it is applied for convenience and safety of handling and application and the deposits must, therefore, be carefully dried in a conventional process before the covering sheet is applied as otherwise the deposits will spread. There is thus a delay during this drying step. A further difliculty of manufacture is that of correctly tensioning the base and covering sheets when they are being brought together. The manufacturing steps have to be carried out with considerable care to minimize the possibility of an explosion. There is danger of an explosion when the covering sheet is brought together with the base sheet as the tissue of the covering sheet will be hardened by the paste. There is a further danger of an explosion when the sheets are being pressed together. As there may be air spaces between the deposits in the final product there will be a possibility of the caps detonating in a series.

The object of this invention is to provide an improved method of making toy caps and also an improved product. The manner in which this is achieved in accordance with this invention will be apparent from the description which follows of the preferred embodiment of this invention.

In the drawings illustrating this invention:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a sheet of caps made in accordance with this invention;

Figure 2 is a section view on the line II of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2 but illustrating an intermediate stage in the manufacture of the sheet of caps.

In accordance with the preferred embodiment of this invention deposits of explosive compound admixed with a liquid such as water are placed in spaced relationship on a base sheet of paper 11 as shown in Figure 3. The foregoing is carried out in a conventional manner using conventional materials. Instead, however, of adhering a sheet of tissue as a covering sheet the upper surface of the base sheet 11 is sprayed with a thin layer 12 of a thermoplastic synthetic resin coating composition to provide the sheet illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. This layer 12 is applied before the explosive composition is completely dried. For example the explosive composition can be partially dried to a moisture content of about 5%. There is a considerable choice of suitable coating compositions but by way of example a conventional latex coating composition applied in a thickness of about 0.005 inch, preferably a transparent or translucent coating composition should be used to facilitate the positioning of the product in the toy pistol or the like in which it is to be used. The sheet can then be severed as indicated by dotted lines 13 in Figure 1 to provide the caps in roll form. Alternatively the sheet can be divided to provide individual caps or caps indisc form.

The foregoing method has the advantages that the dilficult and dangerous operations of bringing the facing sheets and backing sheets together and of pressing these sheets is eliminated. A further advantage is that the possibility of chain detonation of the caps in the final product is considerably lessened. Another important advantage is that the deposits of explosive composition do not have to be completely dried before the spray layer is applied provided that the liquid is immiscible with the plastic coating composition. The caps will dry out through the backing sheet which is of paper or other material permeable to moisture during storage. This both results in a saving in time and increased safety as the damp composition is unlikely to explode during the subsequent handling and subdividing of the sheets.

I claim:

1. In a method of making toy caps the steps of applying spaced deposits of an explosive composition admixed with a liquid to a base sheet permeable to moisture, partially drying said explosive composition to a moisture content at which the explosive composition will not sub stantially spread when sprayed with a coating composition but at which the detonation of said explosive composition will be inhibited, and spraying said base sheet and the partially dried explosive composition with a thin layer of a coating composition immiscible with said liquid to provide a protective covering to consolidate and maintain said deposits in position on the base sheet.

2. In a method of making toy caps the steps of applying spaced deposits of an explosive composition admixed with a liquid to a base sheet permeable to moisture, partially drying said explosive composition to a moisture content at which the explosive composition will not substantially spread when sprayed with a coating composition but at which the detonation of said explosive composition will be inhibited, spraying said base sheet and the partially dried explosive composition with a thin layer of a coating composition immiscible with said liquid to provide a protective covering to consolidate and maintain said deposits in position on the base sheet and subdividing said sheet before the partially dried explosive composition has become substantially completely dry.

3. A process as in claim 1 in which the explosive composition is partially dried to a moisture content of about References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,989,495 Peake Jan. 29, 1935 2,637,664 Howe May 5, 1953 2,665,221 Grangaard Jan. 5, 1954 2,721,140 Weisgerber Oct. 18, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1989495 *Nov 25, 1932Jan 29, 1935The Kilgore Manufacturing Companypeake
US2637664 *Jun 23, 1949May 5, 1953Phillips Petroleum CoCoating articles with an olefinsulfur dioxide resin
US2665221 *Jul 7, 1950Jan 5, 1954Paper Patents CoProcess for impregnating cellulosic sheet
US2721140 *Sep 19, 1952Oct 18, 1955Hercules Powder Co LtdPaper of high wet strength and process therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2942513 *Feb 14, 1958Jun 28, 1960Olin MathiesonElectric blasting initiators
US2998777 *Feb 9, 1959Sep 5, 1961John W RyanPercussive cap structure
US3045377 *Jul 22, 1960Jul 24, 1962Marx & Co LouisToy cap gun
US4294173 *Jun 4, 1979Oct 13, 1981Giampiero FerriAmmunition for a toy weapon
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/281, 86/1.1
International ClassificationF42B39/08, F42B39/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B39/085
European ClassificationF42B39/08C