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Publication numberUS2848996 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1958
Filing dateNov 8, 1956
Priority dateNov 8, 1956
Publication numberUS 2848996 A, US 2848996A, US-A-2848996, US2848996 A, US2848996A
InventorsStephen Kowal Jack
Original AssigneeGordon E Eckley, Vincent D Eckley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe
US 2848996 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aiig. 26, I958 J. s. xwAL 2,348,379?

' SYRINGE Filed Nov. 8, 1956 Jack \Sfephen Kowa/ INVEN TOR.

Atlomq's SYRINGE Application November 8, 1956, Serial No. 621,058 4 Claims. 01. 128-229) This invention relates to a syringe and particularly to a syringe that is adapted to be used for sanitary purposes.

An object of the present invention is to provide a practical, easily used and maintained syringe of the type which is adapted to be connected to a source of liquid under pressure and which is constructed so that upon simple manipulation of a valve, the water may be flushed through a receptacle which contains substances other than water, for example, medicaments or disinfectants, or the water may be channeled directly from the water inlet to the water outlet member.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a device of this character which has a novel assembly including a valve seat and a valve element which is rotatable on the valve seat together with a valve body which holds the element and seat assembled in position, the valve seat having a pair of spaced openings that are adapted to register with a pair of inlet and outlet members respectively when the valve element is in one position and the valve seat being provided with a groove or channel which is so dimensioned as to intercomrnunicate the inlet and outlet members whereby the liquid under pressure may pass directly from the inlet member to the outlet member without passing through the receptacle. In this way a rinse is easily obtained either before or after washing by having the liquid pass through the solution containing receptacle.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of asyringe made in accordance with the principles of the invention;

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the syringe of Figure 1, the valve being in a different position that is, the position for channeling the liquid under pressure directly from the inlet to the outlet member;

Figure 3 is a sectional view of the valve element;

Figure 4 is a sectional view of the valve seat, and;

Figure 5 is an exploded perspective view of the valve parts and a portion of the container on which the valve parts are assembled.

In practicing the invention there is a syringe which may be made of plastic material, such as polystyrene or polyethylene or others, or may be made of a combination of suitable materials. Regardless of the materials of construction there is a receptacle 12 having a neck 14 with an open end 16 on which the valve assembly 18 is disposed.

Valve assembly 18 consists of a valve body 20 which is made as a closure for the neck of the receptacle 12. Therefore, it has a skirt 22 that is provided with internal threads to match the external threads on the neck 14. Alternatively the neck 14 could be provided with a bead and in lieu of the threads in skirt 22, there could be a 2,848,996 Patented Aug. 26, 1958 ice rim which is adapted to snap over the bead. The inwardly directed top panel 24 of valve body 22 has a central aperture 26 in which the valve element 30 is operable. The latter comprises a circular plate 32 that is slightly cambered in cross section (Figure 3) and that has inlet and outlet members 34 and 36 respectively fixed thereto. The inlet and outlet members are preferably tapered nipples having beads 37 and 38 near their ends inv order to aid in frictionally holding tubes 39 and 40 thereon. The tube 39 is adapted to connect to a syringe nozzle while the tube 40 is adapted to connect to a source of water under pressure, for example, a spigot. The inlet and outlet members have passages 42 and 44 that are adapted to register with apertures 46 and 48 which are formed in the valve seat 50.

The valve seat 50 is made of an approximately circular plate 52 which has a diameter slightly in excess of the diameter of the generally circular valve element plate 32. Nipple 54 is integrally connected with the plate 52 and is in registry with aperture 48 thereof. A tube 56 is connected to nipple 54 and is adapted to extend to the bottom or near the bottom of receptacle 12 (Figures 1 and 2). A longitudinal groove or channel 60 is formed in the plate 52 and is located between the apertures 46 and 48. The groove 60 is of such length as to intercommunicate the passages 42 and 44 (Figure 2) when the valve element 30 is in a rinse position. When the valve element 30 is rotated so that the inlet and outlet members are in registry with apertures 46 and 48, the syringe is in a wash position. Between the two positions, there will be no flow from tube 40 to tube 39.

There are means operatively connected with the valve seat 50 and the valve body 20 for preventing the seat from rotating with the valve element 30. These means comprise a projection 63 which is fixed to the valve body 20 and which protrudes downwardly alongside of the valve element 31'? and into a laterally opening recess 64 in the periphery of valve seat 60. In addition, there are means to restrict the travel of the valve element. These last means comprise a lug 65 rising from the surface of plate 32 and located between stops 66 and 68. These stops are fixed to the valve body 20 and project inwardly of the aperture 26. They are adapted to be contacted by the lug 65 upon rotation of the valve element. When the valve element is rotated to the rinse position, the lug 65 is adapted to abut one of the stops. When in the wash position the lug 65 will come in contact with the opposite stop.

In order to secure the valve parts assembled on the receptacle 12, the skirt 22 of valve body 20 is of such diameter that the seat nests in it between the upper edge of the neck 14 of the receptacle and the lower surface of the top panel 24. A pocket is formed in the bottom surface of the top panel 24 to accommodate the valve element 30, holding it nested within the valve body 22 and on the top surface of valve seat 50.

As shown in Figures 3 and 4, the plate 32 of the valve element 30 is slightly cambered in cross section and the same holds true for the plate 52 of valve seat 50. Therefore, when they are brought together and drawn toward each other by tightening valve body 20 on neck 14 of receptacle 12, the valve ports seat tightly in order to form a very etfective seal.

In use the tube 40 is connected to a source of water under pressure. The tube 39 has a nozzle or other type of discharge implement at the end thereof and is used in the customary way. By rotating the valve element to the wash position (Figure l) the liquid passes through tube 40, the inlet member 34 and into the receptacle 12. The water pressure exerted in the receptacle forces liquid into the inlet parts of the valve assembly and tube 39. Rotating the valve element slightly removes the inlet and outlet members from registry with apertures 46 and 48 thereby preventing any flow through the valve assembly. However, further rotation of the valve element 30 in the same direction will bring the inlet and outlet members 34 and 36 into registry with the ends of the groove 60 whereby a flow path is established as is shown in Figure 2. In this position (rinse position) liquid passes directly from inlet member 34 to the outlet member 36 through the connecting groove 60.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modfications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A syringe comprising a receptacle having an open top, a valve seat on said open top, a valve element rotatably disposed on said valve seat, a valve body detacha'bly secured to said receptacle and holding said seat and element assembled in superposition on said receptacle, an inlet and an outlet member connected to said valve element, said seat having a pair of apertures that are spaced to align with said inlet and outlet members when said member is in one position so that liquid passing into said inlet member may pass into said receptacle and issue through said outlet member, said seat having a passage located between said apertures and being of sufficient length to connect said inlet member with said outlet member whereby liquid entering said inlet member by-passes said receptacle and enters said outlet member, means spaced on said valve body and disposed on said valve element-for limiting the extent of travel of said valve element, said seat being of larger diameter than said valve element and having an opening along an edge thereof, and means carried by said valve body and passed alongside of said valve element and located in said opening to prevent said seat from rotating when said valve element is rotated.

2. A syringe comprising a receptacle having an open top, a valve seat on said open top, a valve element rotatably disposed on said valve seat, a valve body detachably secured to said receptacle and holding said seat and element assembled in superposition on said receptacle, an inlet and an outlet member connected to said valve element, said seat having a pair of apertures that are spaced to align with said inlet and outlet members when said member is in one position so that liquid passing into said inlet member may pass into said receptacle and issue through said outlet member, said seat having a passage located between said apertures and being of suflicient length to connect said inlet member with said outlet member whereby liquid entering said inlet member by-passes said receptacle and enters said outlet member, said valve element being made of flexible material and being slightly cambered so that when pressed on said seat it flattens and seals thereon.

3. A syringe comprising a receptacle having an open top, a valve seat on said open top, a valve element rotatably disposed on said valve seat, a valve body detachably secured to said receptacle and holding said seat and element assembled in superposition on said receptacle, an inlet and an outlet member connected to said valve element, said seat having a pair of apertures that are spaced to align with said inlet and outlet members when said member is in one position so that liquid passing into said inlet member may pass into said receptacle and issue through said outlet member, said seat having a passage located between said apertures and being of suflicient length to connect said inlet member with said outlet member whereby liquid entering said inlet member bypasses said receptacle and enters said outlet member, said valve element being made of flexible material and being slightly cambered so that when pressed on said seat it flattens and seals thereon, said valve seat being also cambered.

4. A syringe comprising a receptacle having an open top, a valve seat on said open top, a valve element rotatably disposed on said valve seat, a valve body detachably secured to said receptacle and holding said seat and element assembled in superposition on said receptacle, an inlet and an outlet member connected to said valve element, said seat having a pair of apertures that are spaced to align with said inlet and outlet members when said member is in one position so that liquid passing into said inlet member may pass into said receptacle and issue through said outlet member, said seat having a passage located between said apertures and being of sufficient length to connect said inlet member with said outlet member whereby liquid entering said inlet member by-passes said receptacle and enters said outlet member, said valve seat being made of flexible material and being slightly cambered so that when pressed on said element it flattens and seals thereon.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,286,109 Richardson Nov. 26, 1918 FOREIGN PATENTS 181,355 Germany Mar. 10, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1286109 *Jul 11, 1916Nov 26, 1918Teter Mfg CompanyVapor or gaseous fluid administering apparatus for anesthesia.
DE181355C * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4534758 *Jul 15, 1983Aug 13, 1985Eli Lilly & CompanyControlled release infusion system
US4820269 *Nov 6, 1986Apr 11, 1989Vanderbilt UniversityMixer apparatus for controlling intravenous drug infusion
US5054687 *Mar 14, 1990Oct 8, 1991Ransburg CorporationPressure feed paint cup
US5437654 *Sep 10, 1993Aug 1, 1995Advanced Surgical Products, Inc.Irrigation set
US5741237 *Apr 3, 1996Apr 21, 1998Walker; Kenneth GordonSystem for disposal of fluids
US6488675Oct 15, 1999Dec 3, 2002Fred R. RadfordContaminated medical waste disposal system and method
US6652495Jul 3, 2000Nov 25, 2003Kenneth Gordon WalkerSystem for disposal of fluids
US20040102743 *Nov 24, 2003May 27, 2004Walker Kenneth GordonSystem for disposal of fluids
US20050247121 *May 6, 2005Nov 10, 2005Transmed Medizintechnik Gmbh & Co. KgUrine collection and monitoring system
US20080281283 *Oct 30, 2007Nov 13, 2008Kenneth Gordon WalkerSystem for disposal of fluids
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/85, 222/215, 604/403, 222/630
International ClassificationA61M3/00, A61M3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M3/025
European ClassificationA61M3/02D6