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Publication numberUS2851197 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1958
Filing dateSep 10, 1954
Priority dateSep 10, 1954
Publication numberUS 2851197 A, US 2851197A, US-A-2851197, US2851197 A, US2851197A
InventorsColton George W
Original AssigneeFluid Systems Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for transporting viscous fluid materials
US 2851197 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 9, 1958. G. w. COLTON MEANS FOR TRANSPORTING VISCOUS FLUID MATERIALS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 10, 1954 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Sept. 9, 1958 G. w. COLTON MEANS FOR TRANSPORTING vIscous FLUID MATERIALS Filed Sept. 10, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 v/////////r//////////////////////L7// ////////////////f/4 V'IAVIII 1' I INVEQOR Q? 14 efiazh/ BY ATTORNEYS United States Patent MEANS FOR TRANSPORTIN G VISCOUS FLUID MATERIALS George W. Colton, New Haven, Conn., assignor to Fluid Systems, Incorporated, Hamden, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut Application September 10, 1954, Serial No. 455,325

19 Claims. (Cl. 222-446) This invention relates to an apparatus and method for transporting heavy liquid materials, and particularly to one wherein heat is applied by electrical means to the conductors in which the liquid is transported whereby the viscosity of the liquid will be reduced to render its transportation less difficult. Certain features of the invention are applicable to the transportation of liquids whether or not electrical heating means are employed.

In the transportation or conduction of viscous liquids from a point of storage, for example, such as a tank, to a device adapted to use or receive the liquid, difiiculty is often encountered not only in starting the flow due to the inherent resistance of the liquid to flow but also in maintaining a steady and constant flow without the maintenance of excessively high pressure. In transportation of some liquids, such as heavy fuel oil, for example, from a storage tank to a burner where the oil is to be used, it is customary to provide both a supply and a return line leading from the tank to the burner, or burners, and

Patented Sept. 9, 1958 ice ' liquids such as fuel oil from a supply tank to a point of vide the pipe with heat insulation which also increases the expense of installing both supply and return pipes.

, Such a system for transporting heavy fuel oils as described above is shown in the patent to H. A. Lines, No. 2,224,403, granted December 10, 1940, wherein the supply and return pipes leading from the storage tank to the burner are heated electrically by the electrical heating of the walls of the pipes. It is contemplated by the present invention to provide an efficient and satisfactory system of transporting heavy liquids such as heavy fuel oils by the use of a single supply pipe leading from the supply tank to the burner. is provided adjacent the tank which may, as shown, be housed or installed within the tank itself. This structure includes the pump for effecting the flow of the liquid to the point of delivery and, as the pump is designed to deliver an excess of liquid, there is also included in the unit a by-pass to return the liquid to thetank and a heating device to heat the oil drawn from the tank by the pump. All of this structure is located adjacent the tank or within the tank so that only one pipe, the supply pipe, leads from the tank to the burner or burners, thus effecting a considerable reduction in the cost of installation.

In addition, as will hereinafter appear, certain other advantages flow from the provision of the pump, the

As illustrated, a unitary structure motor for driving the pump, a heater for the oil, and

of electrical current to the supply pipe or a considerable delivery.

Still another object of the invention is to provide means for transporting heavy liquids such as heavy fuel oils, for example, from a supply tank to a point of delivery wherein means are provided to draw an excess of the liquid from the tank and this excess of liquid is im-- mediately returned to the tank at a point adjacent thereto; thus making necessary only a single supply line leading from the tank to the point of delivery.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a unitary structure which may be installed Within a supply tank for heavy liquids, the structure comprising a pump to draw the liquid from the tank and force it to a point .of delivery, a motor for driving the pump, a mechanism for returning excess liquid to the tank, and also, if desirable, means within this unitary structure for heating the oil drawn from thesupply tank.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved method for transporting viscous liquids such as fuel oils, for example, from a supply tank to a point of delivery such as a burner.

To these and other ends the invention consists in the novel features and combinations of parts to be herein after described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings: 1

Fig. 'l is a diagrammatic view showing atransportation system for delivering heavy liquids such as fueloil; for example, from a supply tank to a point of delivery such as a burner or burners in which the oil is to be consumed; and

Fig. 2 is a sectional view of the pipe unit illustrated as installed within a supply tank.

To illustrate a preferred embodiment of my invention I have shown in Fig. l of the drawings a supply tank 10 and oil burners illustrated diagrammatically at 11 and 12. From the tank 10 a supply or delivery pipe 13 leads to the burners, this pipe branching so that one burner may be served by the branch 14 and the other by the branch 15. As it is desired that the pipe be electrically heated, insulated joints 16 and 17 may be installed between the branch lines 14 and 15 and the burners which they serve.

Also as shown in Fig. 1, an electric current is applied to the Wall of the pipe by means of a transformer designated generally by the numeral 18. Surrounding the pipe 13 and also the branches 14 and 15 is insulating material 19 which will preferably have both heat and electrical insulation characteristics, and surrounding. this insulation is a protective sheath 20 of suitable material.

As illustrated, the secondary 21 of the transformer is connected to the pipe 13 by the line 22,. and connected by the line 23 to a return-current-carrying cable 23*. The current may then be completed through that section of the pipe between the transformer connections and the burners by means of an electrical connection between the branch 15 of the pipe and the current-carrying cable 23 As will be hereinafter explained, current is also applied to that portion of the pipe between the transformer and the tank.

The mechanism for pumping and delivering the oil to the pipe 13 and returning an excess of oil supplied by the pump to the tank is shown more particularly in Fig. 2. As illustrated, this mechanism is contained within a housing or well comprising side walls 26, a bottom 27 anda top 28, all of which parts are secured together to make a pressure and fluid-tight structure, and these parts may 50 to carry current between these members.

beef .metal or .any other suitable material. As. shown in Fig. 2, the side walls may be provided with a skirt portion 29 extending slightly below the bottom 27 of the unit. The side walls 26 may be lined interiorly with a heat-insulating lining 26 The tank may be provided with a flanged opening 30, and the top 28 of the housing may be extended laterally to overlie a vflange 31 on the tank so as to besecured thereto. .A gasket 32 of insulating material is disposed between the outer periphery of the top 28 and the flange 31 so as to insulate the housing from the tank.

Supported from the bottom 27 of the well upon a pad 33 of electrical insulating material is a support or standardg34 .by which is carried the pump motor 35 and the pump shown diagrammatically at 36, the pump being driven by the shaft 37. The motor and pump are submerged inxtheihousing or well and the motor casing is of skeletonformso that the motor runs in oil. The pump is provided with an inlet pipe 38 which extends upwardly to a point which may be adjacent to 'the top of the tank, where it is provided with a horizontal perforated section 39 which connects with a suction or supply pipe described hereinafter, through which the oil, if the device is employed in an oil transportation system, is drawn into the pump. The perforations 39 of this section deliver oil into the well formed by the housing walls 26, 27 and 28. Adjacent the lower end of the pipe 38 'is a nipple 40 communicating with the pipe and with the interior of the housing 26 which, as will be explained hereinafter, provides forthe drawing off by the pump of any water or other extraneous material which may collect in the bottorn of the housing and for the priming of the pump upon the initiation of operation of the latter.

Supported from the bottom 27 of the housing is a return pipe unit consisting of pipe sections 41 and 42, these sections being provided with flanges 43 and 44 which may be bolted together through the well bottom by bolts 45. An opening 46 is provided in the 'bottom of the housing so that the pipe sections 41 and 42 communicate with the interior of the tank and insulating gaskets. 47 are provided between the flanges 43 and 44 and the member 27 so that while the flanges are electrically connected by the bolts, they will be insulated from the well. It will be understood that insulating bushings may be provided in the openings in the bottom 27 of the housing through which the bolts pass.

Supported by this return unit is a supply pipe 50 which, as shown, terminates at its lower end at a point slightly above the lower open end of the pipe section 42. Elect'rical connectors or jumpers 51 may be provided between the wall of the section 42 and the lower end of the pipe The pipe 50 maybe supported by a cap 52 separated by an insu: l'atingbushing 53 from the'pipe section 41. The upper end of the pipe 50 communicates with the transverse perforated pipe 39 so as to deliver oil to the pump and to thehousing or well. It may here be noted that, as will be explained in more detail hereinafter, when the pump is set into operation, air will be drawn through the perforations in the pipe 39 which will exhaust much of the "air from the interior of the housing, and, also, oil will be drawn through the pipe 50 to be delivered into the housing or well, as well as to the pump, the oil in the well 'reachingthe level of the perforations in the pipe 39. When these are covered or drowned the level of the oil will rise no higher in the housing and no more air will beexhausted unless new air or vapor is brought up from the tank along with the oil. It will be understood that the nipple 40 is of a very small size as compared to the size of the pipe 38 and will only serve to prime the pump if necessary or to carry from the bottom of the well any moisture or other extraneous material that might collect there.

A pipe 54 is connected to the pump outlet, this pipe leading upwardly through a checkva'lve 55 anda delivery 4 "I nozzle 56 into a shell. 57 within a heating unit or tank 58. The check valve 55 permits the oil to pass upwardly to the heater but prevents its returning to the pump when the latter is inactive and also prevents air passing into the pump from the heater.

The shell 57 is spaced from the side walls of the tank and is closed at its upper end. It is open at its lower end and the walls are spacedfrom the bottom of the tank so that the oil delivered by the pump will pass downwardly through the shell to the bottom of the tank and thence upwardly within the space'around the shell to an outlet pipe 59 which is connected to the burner supply pipe 13 previously described. Therefore, the oil which is delivered by the pump will have to pass downwardly to the bottom of the heating tank before being delivered so that the velocity of circulation will be increased and sedimentation prevented in detrimental amounts.

Within the shell of the heating unit are 'a plurality of heating coils 60, any number of which may be provided, and also within the tank' is provided a temperature-sensing'e'lement 61.

Connected to the delivery pipe 59 by a nipple 64 is a valve casing 65 containing a pressure-regulating by-pass valve 66. A return pipe 67 connects the low pressure side of this valve to the return unit 41 at the bottom of the well. The pressure-regulating valve, as shown, is in the form of a ball valve urged against its seat by a spring 68, but it will be understood that any desired form of "pressure-regulating valve may be employed. This valve will permit any excess oil delivered into the pipe 59 to return to the main supply tank 10 when the pressure below the valve exceeds that exerted by the spring 68. Thus the excess oil which has been heated by the heating unit will be returned to the tank at the point of suction about the suction pipe 50 which leads to the pump inlet.

To'prevent-any airbeing trapped in the upper part of the heating unit and to exhaust this unit of any contained air which may be released from the oil in the heating process, a small pipe 70 leads from the upper portion of the shell 57 into the return pipe 67 on the low pressure side of the valve 66 so that this air will be returned to the main supply tank through the return pipe 67 and an opening 71 in the pipe section 42.

Certain electrical devices necessary for the operation of the system are also mounted within the housing such, for example, as the relay 72 and a thermostat 75, the the latter being connected to the sensing device 61. A conduit 81 leads through the top 28 of the housing to accommodate a cable to carry electric current to the heating device and the motor.

f JThe heating of the pipe 13 between the transformer and the burners has already been described. It may also be desirable to heat that portion of the pipe between the transformer and the well and in addition certain of the pipes within the well. As already explained, the current from the transformer is connected to the pipe 13 and also to the cable 23 These connections are made at a substantially neutral point in the line, and the current flows in both directions from these connections. Referring to Fig. 2, the current will flow through the pipe 13, the nipple 64, valve casing 65, the return pipe 67, the re turn sections 41 and 42 and by means of the jumpers 51 will be carried to the suction pipe 50. A jumper 30 is provided between the pipe 50 and the top 28 of the housing. From the top of the housing -(it will be understood that the housing parts 26, 27 and 28 Will normally be formed of conducting material such as metal) the current passes to the cable 2.3 which is brazed at 20 to the top of the housing. Thus an electrical circuit is also made through the pipes 13, 67, 41, 42 and 50. The pipe 38 may be insulated from the pipe 39 byan insulated joint 82. The pipes are heated by this passage of current-therethrough, and this serves to heat the oil adjacent the point of suction which is desirable in starting a cold" burner.

The operation of the system may now be briefly described. contains oil to a level shown at 83. There will initially, however, be no oil within the housing 26 when it is installed within the tank. A small amount of oil may, however, be placed in this housing so that the oil may be drawn through the nipple 40 by the pump to prime the latter and insure its operation. With the pump in operation air is drawn through the pipe 38 from the interior of the housing tending to exhaust the latter and reducing pressure in the inlet pipe 50. This suction draws the oil into the housing through the pipe 50 until the housing is filled to the level of the perforations in pipe 39, this level being approximately shown at $4. At the same time oil will be drawn through pipe 38 into the pump and will be delivered to the shell 57 of the heater 58. Continued operation of the pump forces oil upwardly around the shell and out of the heater through the pipe 59, and thence through the supply pipe 13 to the burner.

As has been previously stated, the capacity of the pump 36 is such that an excess of oil is delivered to the heater and pipe 59. This excess passes by the pressurerelief valve 66 and is returned by pipe 67 to the return pipe sections 41 and 42. It will be understood that the transformer 18 will be connected with a source of current to apply current to, and therefore heat the Walls of the pipe 13 and in addition the pipes 67, 41, 42 and 50 so that the oil may be heated during its passage to the burners and also during its return from the heater 58 to the supply tank 10. As the lower ends of the pipes 42 and 50 will normally be submerged in the oil in the supply tank during operation of the device, the oil Within the pipe section 42 may be heated by this current prior to the starting of the burner in order to assist in the initiation of flow.

It will be understood that the well or housing will at all times be full or nearly full of warm oil, and this available reservoir of warm oil constitutes a thermal fly wheel in that warm oil will be stored within the housing to be available for use upon initiation of the pump. As the well will always be full of oil up to the level of the perforations in the pipe 39, the pump as well as the heater will be immersed in the oil and the pump will never lose its prime. This in effect provides a valve preventing the oil from flowing back to the tank and leaving the pump dry.

If desired, the horizontal pipe section 39 may be omitted and the upper end of the pipe 50 left open adjacent the indicated oil level 84, and likewise the pipe 38 left open at its upper end adjacent this level. With this construction, when the pump is started, air will be drawn from the housing or well and, when the pressure is sufficiently reduced within the well, oil will be drawn into the well until the level therein is that of the upper end of the pipe 38 when it will be drawn into the pump and discharged into the heater. The operation will otherwise be the same as previously described, and the oil level in the Well will always be maintained at that indicated by the numeral 84 so that the pump and heater will be immersed. Even though the pump may be inoperative for a long period. The Well will always remain full up to the level indicated whether or not the perforated pipe 39 is employed between the pipes 50 and 38.

While I have shown and described a preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be understood that it is not to be limited to all of the details shown, but is capable of modification and variation within the spirit of the invention and with the scope of the claims.

What I claim is:

1. In an apparatus of the character described, a supply tank, a pump mounted within the tank, a suction line for the pump to draw liquid from the tank, a delivery line receiving liquid from the pump outlet and conveying it It may be assumed that the supply tank to a point of delivery without the tank, a by-pass line leading from the delivery line at a point within the tank to return a part of the liquid delivered by the pump to the supply in the tank, a heating chamber through which the oil is forced between the pump and said point in the delivery line to heat the oil delivered by the pump, and a pressure-relief valve controlling the connection between said delivery line and said by-pass line.

2. In an apparatus of the character described, a supply tank, a pump mounted within the tank, a suction line for the pump to draw liquid from the tank, a delivery line receiving liquid from the pump outlet and conveying it to a point of delivery without the tank, a by-pass line leading from the delivery line at a point within the tank to return a part of the liquid delivered by the pump to the supply in the tank, said return being made to a point in the supply tank adjacent the suction of the pump, a heating chamber through which the oil is forced between the pump and said point in the delivery line to heat the oil delivered by the pump, and a pressure-relief valve controlling the connection between said delivery line and said by-pass line.

3. In an apparatus of the character described, a supply tank, a pump mounted within the tank, a suction line for the pump to draw liquid from the tank, a delivery line receiving liquid from the pump outlet and conveying it to a point of delivery without the tank, a bypass line leading from the delivery line at a point within the tank to return a part of the liquid delivered by the pump to the supply in the tank, and a pressure-relief valve controlling the connection between said delivery line and said by-pass line, a heating chamber through which the oil is forced connected to the'delivery side of the pump, a heating element in said chamber, and said heating chamber being disposed between the pump and said bypass means.

4. In an apparatus of the character described, a supply tank, a pump mounted within the tank, a suction line for the pump to draw liquid from the tank, a heating chamber within the tank to which the pump delivers, a heating unit in said chamber, and conduit means leading from the heating chamber to convey a part of the pumped and heated liquid to a remote point of delivery, and bypass means within the tank and adjacent the heating chamber to return another part of the heated liquid from the heating means to the tank supply adjacent the point of suction of the pump.

5. In an apparatus for transporting a viscous liquid, a supply tank, a well within the tank and presenting a compartment separate from the tank, a pump within the well having a suction line leading to the tank to draw liquid from the tank into the well to maintain a quantity of liquid therein, liquid supply means leading from the pump to a remote point of delivery without the tank and bypass means within the well to return a part of the pumped liquid to the supply in the tank.

6. In an apparatus for transporting a viscous liquid, a supply tank, a well within the tank andn presenting a compartment separate from the tank, a pump Within the well having a suction line leading to the tank to draw liquid from the tank into the well to maintain a quantity of liquid therein, liquid supply means leading from the pump to a remote point of delivery without the tank, and by-pass means within the well to return a part of the pumped liquid to thesupply in the tank, said pump being submerged within the liquid in the well.

7. An apparatus for transporting viscous fluid as in claim 6 wherein an oil heater is provided in the well through which oil is passed by the pump to heat the oil circulated by the pump.

8. In an apparatus for transporting a viscous liquid, a supply tank, a well within the tank and presenting a compartment separate fromthe tank, a pump within the well having a suction line leading to the tank to drawliquid from the tank into the well to maintain a quantity of liquid therein, liquid supply means ,leading :from the pump to a remote point of delivery without the tank, bypass means within the well to return a part of .the phmped liquid to the supply in the tank, and a heater in said well between the ,pump and said bypass means whereby the liquid discharged by the pump is heated before return to the supply tank and before being delivered to the supply means leading to said remote point.

9. In an apparatus for transporting aviscous liquid, a supply tank, a well within the'tank'and presenting a compartment separate frorn ,thetank, a pump within the well having a suction line leading .to the .tank to draw liquid from the tank into the Well to maintain a quantity of liquid therein, liquid; supply means leading vfrom the pump to a remote point of delivery without the tank, by-pass means within the wellto vrettirna :part of the pumped liquid to the supply .in-the tank, and a heaterin said well between the-pump andsaid by-pass means whereby the liquid discharged ;.by the pump is heated before return to the supply tank and before being delivered to the supply means leading tosaid =remote point, said pump and heating means being immersed within the liquid in the well.

10. In anapparatus for transporting a viscous liquid,

;a supply tank, awellwithin the tank and presenting a compartment separate from the tank,.a pump within the well having a suction line leading .to the tankto draw liquid from the tank into the well .to maintain a quantity of hquid therein, liquid supply means leadingfrom the pump to a remote point of delivery withoutthe tank, by-

pass means within the well to return a part of the pumped liqu1d to the supply in the tank,,and.means for electrically heating saidliquid supply means without the tank.

ll. In an apparatusfor. transporting aviscous liquid, a supply tank, -a well-within the tank and presenting a compartment separate from the tankfa pump withinthe well having a suction line leading to the tank to draw liquid from the tank intothe wellitomaintaina quantity of liquidtherein, liquid ,sppplymeans leading from the pump to a remote point ofdelivery without the tank, bypass means w1thin the well to retprna part of the pumped liquid to the supply in the .tank, means for electrically heating said liquid supplymeanswithout the tank, and also heating -at least a. portion of the suction and return lines within the tank. i i

12. In anapparatus for transportingaviscous liquid, a tank, suction and return lines having their ends immersed within -the liquid in. the .tank, a .well within the tank and presenting.a ,compartment separate therefrom, a pump withinthe .well-havingits intake .connected with said suction line asupply line to ,which the pump delivers extending withoutthe wellzto a. point remote from the tank, by-pass means within the iwellqconnected to the discharge of the pumpandsaid returneline, and said return line passingthrough-the well to return apart of the pumped liquid to the tank, and. a heating. chamber within the well betweenithepumpand said by-pass means.

13. In an apparatus for. transporting a viscous liquid, a

tank, suctionandreturn lineshavingtheir ends immersed within the liquid in the tank,.a, well within the tank and presenting a compartmenflseparate therefrom, a pump within the well having its. intake. connected with said suction line, a supply line towhich the pump delivers lead- .ing to a point remote from.the.tank,-.by-pass means within the well connected to the discharge of the pump and said return line to return a part ofthe pumped liquid to the tank, said suction line' communicating with the interior of the well to maintain a level of liquid within the well within which the pump is immersed,'and a heating chamber within the well between the pump and said by-pass means.

l4. Inan apparatus for transporting a viscous liquid,

a tank, suction and return l ines having their ends immersed within the liquid in the tank, a well within the tank, a pump withinthe-well having its intake connected with said'suction'linefa supply line to which the pump delivers leading ,to apoint remote from the tank, by-pass means witbin the well connected to the discharge of the pump and'said return line to return a part of the pumped liquid tothe tank, said pump maintaining a level of liquid within the well within which the pump is immersed, a heater within the well between the pump and said supply line, and means to heat the liquid prior to its delivery to said supply line and to said by-pass means to deliver heated liquid to said remote point and to return heated liquid to the tank.

' 15. In an apparatus for transporting a viscous liquid, a tank, suction and return lines'having their ends immersed within the liquid in the tank, a wellwithin the tank, a pump within the well having its intake connected with said suction line, means whereby said pump maintains a level of oil in the well within which the pump is immersed, a supplyline to which the pump delivers leading to a point remote fromthe tank, by-pass means within the well connected to the discharge of the pump and said return line to return a part of the pumped liquid to the tank, and electricakmeans for-heating said supply line and at least a part of .said suction and return lines within the tank.

16. In an apparatus for transporting a viscous liquid,

atank, suction andreturn lines having their ends imthe tank, and electrical means ,for heating saidsupply line and at least a part of said suction and return lineswithin the tank, including fthe immersed portions of the latter. 17. in combination with a supply tank in which oil or other viscous liquid is tobe transported, a heater supported by the tank wall, inlet and outlet means for the "heater, a heating element in said heater, a pump having its outlet connected to'the inlet'of the heater to force the oil therethrough, conduit means connected to the outlet means of the heater to convey a portion of the pumped oil to a remote point of delivery, by-pass means toreturn a' portion ,of the oil fromthehea'ter to the tank, theinlet of said by-pass means being adjacent the outlet means of the heater, and a pressure-relief valve to control said by-pass means.

18. in combination with a supply tank in which oil or other viscous liquid is to be transported, a heater supported by the tank wall, inle't'and outlet meansfor the heater, a heating element in said heater, apump having its outlet connected to the inlet of theheater to force the oil therethrough, conduit means connected to the outlet means of the heater to convey a portion of the pumped oil to a remote point of delivery, by-pass means to return a portion of the oil from the heater to the tank, the inlet of said by-pass'means being adjacent the outlet means of the heater, a pressure-relief valve to control said bypass means, and meansto heat said conduit means between the tank and the point of delivery of the oil.

19. In an apparatus of the character described, a supply tank, a pump mounted within the tank, a suction line for the pump to draw liquid from the tank, a delivery line receiving liquid from the pump outlet and conveying it to a point of delivery without the tank, a bypass line leading from the delivery line at a point within the tank References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Losee Mar. 12, 1940 Wilson Oct. 31, 1933 McFerran May 29, 1934 Lines Dec. 10, 1940 Bachmann Mar. 18, 1941 Shepperd et a1. Mar. 10, 1942 Hutterer Dec. 28, 1943 Mueller et a1 Jan. 20, 1948 Kateley Nov. 14, 1950

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3269599 *Oct 29, 1964Aug 30, 1966Leonard E AustinBeverage dispenser
US3969608 *Oct 15, 1974Jul 13, 1976Day Joseph MViscous liquid conveying apparatus
US4096973 *Mar 17, 1976Jun 27, 1978Checko John CPortable sealant applicator
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US6179523Mar 26, 1996Jan 30, 2001Shell Oil CompanyMethod for pipeline installation
US6264401Mar 26, 1996Jul 24, 2001Shell Oil CompanyMethod for enhancing the flow of heavy crudes through subsea pipelines
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EP2487415A1 *Feb 10, 2011Aug 15, 2012Siemens AktiengesellschaftAn arrangement for preparation of liquid fuel for combustion and a method of preparing liquid fuel for combustion
WO2012107287A1 *Jan 25, 2012Aug 16, 2012Siemens AktiengesellschaftAn arrangement for preparation of liquid fuel for combustion and a method of preparing liquid fuel for combustion
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/146.5, 222/318, 222/385, 392/478
International ClassificationF23K5/02, F23K5/20
Cooperative ClassificationF23K5/20
European ClassificationF23K5/20