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Publication numberUS2852024 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1958
Filing dateJul 26, 1954
Priority dateJul 26, 1954
Publication numberUS 2852024 A, US 2852024A, US-A-2852024, US2852024 A, US2852024A
InventorsRyan George R
Original AssigneeAbbott Lab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure with integral drip tube
US 2852024 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 16, 1958 G. R. RYAN cLosuRE WITH rNTEGRAL DRIP TUBE Filed July 26, 1954 Il Il Il Il l 'BEEF/l In'unor George R. gan .Btg W/M otneg,

CLosURn WITH INTEGRAL DRIP TUBE George R. Ryan, Waukegan, Ill., assignor to Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application July ze, i954, sensi No. 445,623

s claims. (ci. 12s-214) This invention relates to apparatus for parenteral administration of liquids and more particularly to a closure cap and drip chamber for containers of liquids which are administered intravenously.

in accordance with modern hospital procedure, it has become common practice to eliminate the resterilization and reuse of apparatus for administering iluids parenteral- 1y, in order to avoid the dangers associated with the handling of the apparatus after use and prior to sterilization, as Well as to eliminate all possibility of improper cleaning and incomplete sterilization of the apparatus. Accordingly, many types of disposable venocylsis apparatus have been developed with which parenteral solutions can be effectively administered. It frequently has been necessary, however, to combine several distinct pieceshof Venocylsis apparatus to achieve the desired result. Thus, for example, in administering a solution from a container it has been common practice to use a glass or rigid clear plastic drip meter device associated with a special cap member for the container. Also, where a uid pumping device is desirable in the system, it would be necessary to insert between the drip meter device and the patient a separate piece of apparatus capable of exerting a pumping action of the iuid in the apparatus system.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide more economical disposable apparatus for parenteral administration of liquids which can be maintained in a sterile condition ready for immediate use.

It is another object of the invention to provide a closure cap for a container of parenteral solutions with a ilexible walled drip chamber integrally formed therewith.

Itis still another object of the present invention to provide a unitary plastic disposable closure cap and drip chamber.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the detailed description and claims to follow, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing: y

Figure l is an exploded perspective view of the closure cap and drip chamber of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view of the integral closure cap and drip chamber shown in Figure l;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the closure shown in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a sectional view along the line 4 4 of Figure 2.

The improved apparatus of the present invention as il lustrated in the drawing is employed in association withl a container for intravenous liquids as represented by the bottle 1 which is suspended in an inverted position so that its neck projects downwardly from the bottle 1. The neck of the bottle 1 is provided with suitable external screw threads 2. The unitary closure cap and drip chamber 3 which is preferably formed of a flexible resilient plastic material, such as polyethylene plastic, is provided with a screw threaded body section 4 having screw threads 5 on the inner surface thereof, the said screw threads 5 being such as to tit the external screw threads 2 on the neck of the bottle.

The end wall 6 of the closure cap 3 is provided with an Y adaptor or suitable fluid administering means. The' downwardly extending cylindrical section 8 preferably hasa wall thickness y(preferably approximately 0.020" thick) such that the drip chamber formed thereby is sufficiently transparent to permit observation of the interior thereof but at the same time being suliciently rigid to retain its original shape and requiring only relatively slight pressure to temporarily collapse, thereby serving as a liquid pump when compressed by the pressure of the fingers of the operator administering the liquid. The longitudinally extending ridges 12 are preferably disposed at diametrically opposite sides of the drip chamber and extend the entire length of the relatively thin wall section 8 from the end wall 6 to the reduced section 10.

The endv wall 6 adjacent the enlarged opening 7 is provided with a groove or recessed portion 13 into which is preferably snap-fitted a plug member 14 comprising' a main disc portion 15 of such size that the peripheral portion of the disc having a flange 16 adjacent the lower edge thereof resiliently engages the groove 13 in the end wall and is securely held therein.

The plug member 14 is provided with an outwardly projecting cylindrical portion 17 which extends from the lower surface of the disc member and which when the plug 14 is disposed in the opening 7 extends into the interior of the drip chamber 9 and'serves as a drop former. Plug member 14 also is provided with an oppositely extending cylindrical portion 18 in axial alignment with the outwardly extendingk portion 17 which serves as the inlet to the drip chamber 9. Since the cylindrical portion 18 extends above the end Wall of the closure cap 3, theV portion of the cap 3 between the end wall 6 and the upper e-nd of cylindrical portion 18 serves as a sedimentation collector and tends to prevent any large particles in the intravenous liquids entering the drip chamber and passing through the flexible tubing into the body of the patient. The cylindrical portion 18 also serves as a retainer and support for a lter element (not shown) which can be mounted thereon.l

The end Wall 6 is also provided with an outwardly projecting small diameter tubular section 19, the walls of which are preferably substantially rigid. Intermediate the ends thereof and below the end wall 6 there is provided a conical check ball valve seat 20 terminating in a small diameter portion 21 which serves to divide the tubu'- lar section 19 into an upper and a lower chamber. The enlarged lower chamber 22 having inwardly tapered lateral surfaces suitable Ifor receiving an adaptor provided with` a Luer taper secured to the end of a length of flexible tubing or the like. A suitable ball check member 23 is disposed in the upper chamber 24 and is maintained therein by a plurality of inwardly projecting lugs 25' extending from the end wall 6 and disposed about the upper edge of the said chamber. The ball member 23 is free to move in the direction of the axis of the tubular section 19 so that when the ball rests on the valve seat 2 0 the passage ofliquid downwardly through section 19 from the container is prevented but when the pressure within the container is less than atmospheric pressure as a result of withdrawal of liquid from the container through the drip chamber, air will pass upwardly through the ball check valve tending to equalize the pressure within the container with the atmospheric pressure.

Disposed on the lower end of the tubular member 19 is a filter cap member 26 having a lower chamber 27 provided with an opening 28 at the outer end thereof. EX- tending from the upper edge of the chamber 27 is a larger diameter section 29 adapted to removably engage the tubular section 19 without, however, exerting any substantial pressure upon the tubular section 19 as to cause distortion of the ball check valve seat 20. Intermediate the sections 27 and 29 of the cap member there is provided a stop flange 3i) which is adapted to engage the lower end wall of the tubular section 19 to prevent the cap member being forced onto the end of the tubular section 19 and thereby exerting a distorting pressure on the ball valve seat. The lower section 27 of the cap is adapted to receive a wad of cotton or other filtering material suitable for preventing dust, bacteria, and the like being carried into the parenteral liquids along with the air passing therethrough.

The upper surface of the end wall 6 of the cap 3 is also provided with an upwardly extending circular ridge or sealing ring 31 having a relatively thin diameter section at the upper edge thereof adapted to engage the lip of the bottom neck when the cap 3 is fully seated thereon and thereby serve as an integral sealing gasket to prevent the leakage of intravenous liquids.

A dust cap 37, as shown in Figure l of the drawing, is adapted to removably engage the upper end of the closure cap and is preferably provided with a tab member 33 to facilitate the removal of the dust cap from the end of the cap. The dust cap member 37 in combination with the filter cap member 26 and the protector cap 39 enclosing the adaptor which is secured to the end of the tiexible tubing 11 and which supports a pinch clamp 40, as shown in Figure l, maintain the apparatus in a sterile condition and prevent contamination with bacteria or dust subsequent tothe sterilization of the said closure cap.

ln operation, the preferred form of the invention shown in Figure 2 is applied to the neck of the bottle 1 containing the intravenous liquid by removing the dust cap 37 from the upper end of the closure `cap 3 and screwing the said closure cap onto the threaded neck of the bottle with the bottle in an upright position so as to tightly seat the closure cap upon the neck of the bottle forming a liquid tight seal between the lip of the bottle and the sealing ring 31 on the inner surface of the end wall 7 of the cap. The bottle 1 with closure cap 3 securely disposed on the said neck thereof is then inverted after clamping the flexible tubing by means of a pinch clamp 40, as shown in Figure l, to prevent the flow of liquid therethrough. While inan inverted position with the closure cap and drip chamber in a downwardly extending position with the pinch clamp 40 closed, the flexible drip chamber 9 is pumped by compressing a sufiicient number of times to partially fill the said chamber with liquid. The pinch clamp 40 is then opened and a column of liquid flows down the length of flexible tubing displacing the air therein insuring the complete absence of air bubbles from the said flexible tubing and the pinch clamp closed. Thereafter the hypodermic needle which has previously been secured to the end of the flexible tubing is inserted into the patient. The pinch clamp 40 is then gradually opened until the desired rate of ow of intravenous liquid is attained. The rate of flow is readily determined by observing the number of drops of liquid formed per minute at the upper end of the drip chamber as the drops fall through the air space within the partially liquid filled drip chamber, said chamber being suiciently transparent to permit ready observation of the drops formed within the said chamber. During the administration of the intravenous liquid a partial vacuum is formed Within the container lby the withdrawal of liquid therefrom and at frequent intervals the ball member 23 will be forced upwardly away from ball check valve seat 20 permitting air to flow upwardly through the cotton air filter into the interior of the intravenous liquid bottle thereby tending to equalize the pressure within the container with the atmospheric pressure. After the liquid within bottle 1 has been completely Withdrawn and before all the liquid is emptied from the drip chamber, the flow of liquid is completely interrupted by moving pinch clamp 4t) to a sealing position, thereby preventing air entering the patient.

During the administration of the liquid it sometimes happens that an obstruction plugs the inlet end of the cylindrical portion 18. With the structure of the present invention, however, obstructions are readily removed simply by closing the flexible tubing 11' secured to the discharge outlet of the drip chamber and squeezing the flexible dri-p chamber with the fingers, thereby creating a back pressure forcing air upwardly through cylindrical portion 1S and dislodging the obstruction in the said opening. Also, where a filter element is secured to the end portion 18 and becomes partially blocked by solid suspended particles in the liquid, the said filter can be cleared by compressing the walls of the filter drip chamber creating the necessary back pressure.

It is also a frequent occurrence that the liquid level in the drip chamber becomes so high that it is impossible to accurately observe the drops formed and determine the rate of flow of intravenous liquid. This condition is commonly referred to as a flooded drip chamber. A flooded drip chamber as above described is overcome with the apparatus of the present invention by merely closing the flexible delivery tubing adjacent the drip chamber and inverting the drip chamber and bottle so that the vchamber is above the inlet thereto. The liquid in the flooded drip chamber is then readily pumped therefrom into the bottle simply by squeezing the drip chamber, thereby replacing the liquid by air. In this way the drip chamber can be partially or completely emptied of liquid and refilled with air. The drip chamber and the bottle can then be returned to an inverted position with the cap and drip chamber pointing downwardly and the desired liquid level adjusted in the usual manner. Thus, if the liquid level in the drip chamber is lower than desired, air can be pumped out of the drip chamber into the bottle by squeezing the drip chamber while in the latter position.

While the apparatus in its preferred Aform is molded of polyethylene plastic, it should be understood that the preferred form of the invention can also be molded of other flexible plastic material, such as polyvinyl. It is also possible, however, to mold the closure cap shown herein of a wide variety of plastic materials including polyethylene, polyvinyl, polystyrene, nylon, and other flexible and rigid plastic materials. The drip chamber in each Iinstance is formed preferably of polyethylene plastic where it is desired to have a flexible resilient drip chamber. If a exible drip chamber is not desired, however, the chamber 9 can be molded of rigid plastic material, such as polystyrene. Also, the cap body member can be formed of a rigid plastic material, such as nylon, and the drip chamber formed of a tiexible plastic, such as polyethylene, and the two sections joined into a unitary structure, as by a solvent, adhesive, or heat seal.

Others may readily adapt the invention for use under various conditions of service, by employing one or more of the novel features disclosed or equivalents thereof. As at present advised with respect to the apparent scope of my invention, I desire to claim the following subject matter.

Iclaim:

l. Apparatus -for the administration of parenteral liquids comprising a plastic closure cap and drip tube means for a container of a parenteral liquid having an end wall and a body section provided with means for detachably connecting the said cap means to the said container and having an air inlet opening in the said end wall adapted to receive an air valve means, a liquid outlet opening in said end wall adjacent said inlet opening and having a tubular section extending outwardly therefrom, an elongated plastic chamber disposed about the said liquid outlet opening and tubular section, said chamber having flexible resilient walls capable of being readily deformed and returning to the original conguration thereof and having the outer end provided with a reduced diameter section with a small diameter outlet opening securable to a length of flexible tubing for conveying the said parenteral liquid therethrough.

2. Apparatus for the administration of parenteral liquids comprising a plastic closure cap and drip tube means for a container of a parenteral liquid having an end wall and a body section provided with means for detachably connecting the said cap means to the said container and having an air inlet opening inthe said end wall adapted to receive an air valve means, a liquid outlet opening in said end wall adjacent said inlet opening having a tubular section extending outwardly therefrom, a relatively thin walled elongated plastic chamber disposed about the said liquid outlet opening and tubular section, said chamber having exible resilient walls formed integrally with the said end wall and capable lof being readily deformed and returning to the original configuration thereof and having the outer end thereof provided with a reduced diameter section with a small diameter outlet opening securable to a length of flexible tubing for conveying the said parenteral liquid therethrough.

3. Apparatus for the administration of parenteral liquids comprising a plastic closure cap and drip tube means for a container of a parenteral liquid having an end wall and a body section provided with means for detachably connecting the said cap means to the said container and having an air inlet opening in said end Wall adapted to receive an air valve means, a relatively large diameter outlet opening in said end wall adjacent the said inlet opening, a plug member with a relatively small diameter axial passage therethrough adapted to be retained in said outlet `opening and provided with a tubular section extending outwardly from said end wall, an elongated plastic chamber disposed about said tubular section coaxially therewith extending outwardly from the said end wall and being integral therewith, said chamber having ilexible resilient walls `formed integrally with the said end wall and capable of being readily deformed and returning to the original configuration thereof and having the outer end thereof provided with a reduced diameter section with a small diameter outlet opening adapted to be secured to a length of exible tubing for conveying the said parenteral liquid therethrough.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,844,342 Berman Feb. 9, 1932 2,109,720 Deschner Mar. 1, 1938 2,138,936 Osterberg Dec. 6, 1938 2,452,644 Fields Nov. 2, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1844342 *Apr 21, 1930Feb 9, 1932Phoebus BermanBottle nozzle
US2109720 *Oct 31, 1936Mar 1, 1938Deschner Richard ESanitary closure for receptacles containing pourable substances
US2138936 *Jan 15, 1936Dec 6, 1938Chemical Foundation IncApparatus for intravenous administration of fluids
US2452644 *Oct 5, 1946Nov 2, 1948Abbott LabApparatus for intravenous administration of liquids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3128917 *Apr 14, 1964 krause
US3193993 *Feb 1, 1963Jul 13, 1965Baxter Don IncAir inlet filter for a parenteral solution container
US3216418 *Jun 1, 1962Nov 9, 1965Abbott LabApparatus for administering parenteral solutions
US3659629 *May 4, 1970May 2, 1972Ahldea CorpLiquid flow regulator and monitor for corporeal infusion system and method of using the same
US3783895 *May 4, 1971Jan 8, 1974Sherwood Medical Ind IncUniversal parenteral fluid administration connector
US3797521 *Aug 2, 1972Mar 19, 1974Sci Systems IncDispensing closure for parenteral fluid container
US4516754 *May 14, 1984May 14, 1985Kerotest Manufacturing Corp.Bent bellows sealed rotary valve
US4648873 *May 6, 1985Mar 10, 1987Quest Medical, Inc.Adapter for intravenous delivery set
US4888008 *Aug 30, 1988Dec 19, 1989Sherwood Medical CompanyVented spike connection component
US4997429 *Dec 28, 1988Mar 5, 1991Sherwood Medical CompanyEnteral bottle cap with vent valve
US5848994 *Dec 18, 1996Dec 15, 1998Richmond; Frank M.IV sets with needleless spikeless fittings and valves
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US8882738Feb 15, 2012Nov 11, 2014Icu Medical, Inc.Locking vial adaptors and methods
US8945084Sep 30, 2011Feb 3, 2015Icu Medical, Inc.Pressure-regulating vial adaptors and methods
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US9107808Sep 20, 2013Aug 18, 2015Icu Medical, Inc.Adaptors for removing medicinal fluids from a container
US9132062Feb 12, 2014Sep 15, 2015Icu Medical, Inc.Pressure-regulating vial adaptors
US9351905Mar 28, 2013May 31, 2016Icu Medical, Inc.Anti-reflux vial adaptors
US9610217Sep 17, 2014Apr 4, 2017Icu Medical, Inc.Pressure-regulating vial adaptors
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US20080308166 *Oct 19, 2006Dec 18, 2008Richmond Frank MConnector/Device with Reflux Valves
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EP1010412A3 *Dec 14, 1999Nov 8, 2000Fresenius Kabi Deutschland GmbHAdapter for the connection of devices for enteral nutrition
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/251
International ClassificationB65D47/18, B65D47/06, A61M5/162, A61M5/14
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/162, A61M2005/1623, B65D47/18
European ClassificationB65D47/18, A61M5/162