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Publication numberUS2852278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1958
Filing dateOct 13, 1950
Priority dateOct 13, 1950
Publication numberUS 2852278 A, US 2852278A, US-A-2852278, US2852278 A, US2852278A
InventorsRodolphe Dere Jean
Original AssigneeRodolphe Dere Jean
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Basic business form and extensions thereof
US 2852278 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

BASIC BUSINESS FORM AND ExTENsIoNs THEREOF Filed oci. 13, 195o .L R. DER

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J. R. DERE BASIC BUSINESS FORM AND EXTENSIONS THEREOF 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sept. 16, 1958 Filed Oct. 13, 1950 J. R. DER i BAsIc BUSINESS FORM AND ExTENsIoNs Tmp" File@ oct. 1s, 195o Sept 95 52,278

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' BASIC BUSINESS #om AND ExTENsIoNs THEREOF Y Filed oct. 13, 195o 4 sheets-sheet 4 ///5 lroeA/EK United States Patent C BASIC BUSINESS FGRM AND EXTENSIONS THEREOF .lean Rodolphe Der, Paris, France Application @einher 13, 1950, Serial No. 189,918

12 Claims. (Cl. 283-62) This invention relates to record bearing forms, and more particularly lto improvements in and standardization f forms for universal application.

Under present practice there are various kinds and sizes of forms available, but they are limited for use by the particular manner of handling and the characteristics of various types of binders, files, sorters and finders, all of which are well known in the art. Moreover the present increase in in-tercommunication between various nations of the world tends to create confusion by reason of business forms in one nation differing considerably from those in other nations. The principal reason for this difference arises from the adoption of the metric system of measures in some nations such as those of Continental Europe, whereas in other or English speaking nations the English system of measures by inches and fractions thereof is the standard for measuring articles.

The present invention is intended for coordination of record bearing forms for binding, filling, sorting and finding under either the English or metric system of measures. ln this connection the form is provided with structural features coordinated with several systems of measures.

Broadly considered, the invention consists in providing sheets, cards or the like, with one or more series of perforations and/or indicia therefor, each series being based upon a different system of measures as circumstances require. Another object is to so correlate the size of the forms with various series of perforations and/ or indicia therefor for adopting such forms for filing, binding, sorting or finding under standards employed in European as well as English speaking nations.

The cost of printed forms is generally estimated at a rate of one to seven, relative to clerical costs for subsequent manipulations. Consequently, controlled and coordinated procedural forms must be drawn to meet principally the requirements of administrative operations. It is therefore another object of this invention to provide a form with appropriate and coordinated indicia for clerical and mechanical procedures. In this connection a basic size of form has been adopted from which larger or smaller forms can be made in proportionate units of increase and decrease of size, suitable for coordination and registration with several standard mechanical media with which business forms may be attached or manipulated.

Regardless of variation in size, most forms have in common such basic indications as number of the form, a title or caption box, location, date, source and prenumber boxes. For purposes of checking and analysis, different graduations of squares or the like may be provided. For classifying, alphabetical or numerical series are used, and for mechanical handling, holes are punched into the card to suit pinwheel feeds, ring binders, keysorters and pegboards or such systems of ling. To this end it is an object of the present invention to pro- Vide a form, bearing indicia suitable for many of the p 2,852,278 Patented sept. 16, s

common usages mentioned, but so coordinated that these indicia will facilitate manipulation of the form with certain or several of the beforementioned uses.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent in the following description with reference to the drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan View of one face of the basic form or card embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is similarly a plan view of the reversed side of the card shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a view of a card similar to that shown in Figs. 1 and 2 but reduced to a size suitable for library index cards or the like.

Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 are composite fragmentary views of a continuous form which is an extension in size of the form shown in Fig. l and Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 and Fig. 7 are composite fragmentary views of an extended form similar to those Of Figs. 4 and 5 but under the metric system.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of several of the basic cards of Figs. l and 2 associated with one well known form of ringbinder.

Fig. 9 illustrates cards of Figs. 1 and 2 employed in a keysorter system.

Fig. 10 illustrates cards of Fig. 3 used in a library filing system.

Fig. 11 illustrate the cards of Figs. 1 and 2 adapted for suspension on rails, another well known mechanism for card filing and handling.

Fig. l2 is illustrative of the card of the present invention for continuous forms which are pinwheeled on a typewriter pla-tten roller.

Fig. 13 is a perspective view of several of the cards of Figs. 1 and 2 mounted on spaced rails.

Fig. 14 is a perspective view of a summary board having Several of the basic forms shown in Figs. 1 and 2 associated therewith.

Fig. l5 is an enlarged plan view of a length of microfilm illustrating the basic forms of the present invention therein.

In the drawings a basic form or card l0, best adapted for the purpose of the present invention, is shown in Fig. 1. This card is of the basic size from which forms of greater or lesser dimension can be made without deviating from the plan or purpose for which the basic form is provided. In any case, each form, whether large or small, is provided with indicia for facilitating punching of the card at spacings predicated on either the metric or the English system of measures.

As illustrated in Fig. l, the basic card lil is 5 inches square and the printed matter thereon is limited to a form 12.5 centimeters square. The 5 inch card has a 1/2 inch margin on any one side by printing a central iield of 4 inch square thereon for the reception of data, a letter or any other informational markings intended to be preserved for future reference. The central field is further encompassed by lines of 10 centimeter length each, which with the aforementioned four inch lines form a double line whereby the central field may be divided further, either in accordance with the metric or the English system of measures, at the option of the user of the form. For this purpose graduations according to either or both of the aforementioned systems of measures may be printed between the'double lines to provide a guide for subdividing the central eld of the card.

in the present disclosure the card is shown to be printed, as above explained, on both sides, certain indicia on one side of the card matching with those on the other side thereof so as not to upset or disturb the checking or marking attributes of the card when holes are punched into the same for purposes of binding, ling or otherwise preparing the card for one or more of its usual purposes.`

In connection with the foregoing, and for purposes of clarity, orientation of the card is best facilitated by referring to the edges of the card in accordance with the points of the compass. To this end the edges of the main or. one side M'of the card (Fig. '1) are designated N, S, E, and W. These edges correspond to like margins on the reverse side R`of. the card (Fig. 2) designated NR, SR, ER, and WR, respectively.

The printed matter on both they main and reverse side of the card is similar, it being noted, however, that the caption or top margin C of the printed matter on the main side M of the card (edge N) is directly behind the lower margin LM on the reverse side of the card NR.

Conversely the lower margin L ofthe main side of the card (edge S) is directly behind the caption or top'margin CR of the printed matter on the reverse side of the card (edge SR).

Referring now to Figs. 1 and 2, the printed matter on either side'of the card consists of marking, checking and other analysis, finding or`mark receiving areas, confined within the aforementioned half inch margin or border surrounding the central field of the card.

The caption or top margin on either side of the card is preferably divided into three bands referred to as exterior, interior andv medial band, 11, 12 and 13, respectively. The exterior band 11 is divided into 77 equal divisions of 1/15 inch each for alphabetical signs in coordinated sequence, leaving suicient intermediate subdivisions between the twenty six letters of the VEnglish alphabet to allow for insertion of additional foreign letters of varying phonetic qualities and accompanying accenting marks. 'The band 11 may be further subdivided lengthwise to provide several bands of squares 11', one set for the above mentioned alphabetical signs and the other set of squares 11 being useful for filling in according to a code system.

The interior band 12 consists of a central area 12 for receiving the title or name of an individual connected with data to be noted in the central field of the card. Each portion of the band 12 remaining on either side of the area 12 thereof is divided into six substantially square areas 12" making twelve divisions in ali. These substantially square areas, as exemplified lin the drawing, are for purposes of classification based upon subdivisions of the number 12, for example the months of the year, Fig. 1, or as shown in Fig. 2, any ten of these areas 12 may b e used for the same purpose under the metric system of measures.

The medial band 13 is most important to the present invention in that it is provided with printed circles 13 including marked zones of perforation each of a diameter corresponding substantially with the `size of holes required to fit the shank of a standard ringbinder. The spacing of the circles 13' from each other is determined by either the English Vor metric system of measures as the case may be, so that these circles 13 constitute a guide for accurately punching the zones of perforation in the card 10 to suit the particular ringbinder into which it is to be bound.

On the main face of card 10, Fig. 1, the circles 13 in the caption margin C are spaced three eighths (f/s) of an inch center to center from each other which will register them exactly with the hole punching indicia 13 on the reverse side R of the card as best indicated at the lower marginvLM of the card of Fig. 2. Referring to Fig. 2 the circles 13 in the caption Ymargin CR are spaced ten millimeters or one vcentimeter center to center from each other to match exactly with the holes punched in the zones of perforation included in the indicia circles V13" in the lower marginLof the'main vside of the card, i. e., along the edge S thereof directly opposite the caption margin C in'Fig. 1.

Assuming `now that the card 10 bearing certain data arrives at anotiice using'the metric system of binder ring spacing of `either 7l Vor 8 cm. Such card is therefore punched at 7 Yo1" 8cm. spacings of the indicia 13" in the lower margin on the main side M of the card. In this case the informational data such as title or name of the individual or subject on the card is printed in the central area 12 of band 12 adjacent the edge N of the card. Should the same card or a copy thereof arrive at an oice using the English system of measures between rings 0f a binder, for example or multiples thereof, the card is punched at 3A; inch spacings ofthe indicia 13" on the reverse side R of the card adjacent the edge NR thereof. The informational data in this case is printed on the reverse side R (Fig. 2) in the central area 12 of the band 12 adjacent the edge SR of the card. In the event the office receiving the aforementioned card uses ringbinders spaced 2% inches from each other it will be noted that the binding may be made by punching the zones included in the indicia circles 13" spaced 1 cm. from each other. In other words, holes punched 7 cm. from each other are 2.7524 inches center to center and therefore will lit rings spaced 2% Vinches from each other. In the latter case the informational data will be printed on the main side M of the card in the central area 12'" of band 12 (edge N).

In either of the foregoing events the squares 11' and 11"4 in exterior band 11 are marked in alphabetical code, and squares 12" on either side of the central area 12 of band 112 are markedl in numerical code. In addition to the foregoing codification of the card and binding of the card either under the English or the metric system Vof measures, the intermediate band 13 within the caption margin containing the informational data, is provided with capital letters A to These letters are alternately printed within the indicia circles 13 and the spaces between such circles. On the main side M of the card the lettery A is` printed in the space ahead of the first inl dicia circle 13 of caption margin C, the first indicia circle having letter B printed therein and vso forth. On the reverse Side R of the card alternate letters B, D, F, `H, etc.,'are printed in the`spaces between the indicia circles 13 of caption margin CR.

Referring now to the side margins of the card 10 it will be noted that they are provided with perforations 1S for adapting the cardfor use in manifold types of forms commonly referred to as continuous forms. These perforations 15 are uniformly spaced on one-half (1/2) inch centers and when'pr'epunched will fit the teeth or cogs of pinwheels by which' several manifolded forms are registered and advanced through billing machines. See for example the pinwheels on the platten roll shown in Fig. l2.

The perforations 1S are identical on both sides M and R 'of the card' and are coordinated with the indicia circles 13 and 13"`on either side of the card. In this connection it will be noted in Fig. 1 that the uppermost perforations 15" register Videntically with the outermost indicia circles'13 o'n each 'endof the band 13. Consequently, the lowerrnost perforations 15" fall exactly in alignment with the line of indiciacircles 13" in the lower margin L on the main side M of the card as seen in Fig. l.

Since'the'afo'r'ementioned lowermost perforations 15" are off center laterally with respect to the zones of perforationin the outermost indicia circles 13, the former are predominant over the latter on the card. However, only the innermost semicircle of these perforations 15 are printed, their open sides having laterally extending tangent legs 'to form U-shaped indicia 16. Each U- shaped indicia -16 includes a transverse line 16 l cm. from center of the adjacent indicia circle 13 to coordinate with the zones of perforation in the indicia 13" in the lowermargin as well as with the perforations in the side margins `of`the card.

'In conjunction with the foregoing it will be noted in Fig; 2`thatcrr'esponding U-shaped indicia 16" are provided in the caption margin CR on the reverse side R of thecard. `These U-sh'aped indicia 16, when cut or punchedfout, provide'lateral slots 17 (Fig. 11) whereby the cardV 11)"can be suspended from suspension rails 1F19:

It will be apparent that if the card be printed on one side only, the caption margin CR, for instance, in Fig. 2 can be printed in place of the lower margin L in Fig. 1 if it is desired to do so. In either event it will be apparent that the card so printed is susceptible to similar utility and coordination as explained herein.

Referring now to the extension as well as to the reduction in size of a form or a card employing the foregoing arrangement of printed features and punching or perforations and indicia therefor, it will be noted that the card is increased or reduced in size in coordination with the spacing of the indicia circles in all of its margins. Extension or reduction in size of the basic form of the present invention in a north to south direction is made in multiples of 1/2 inch and in an east to west direction in multiples of 3A; inch.

Recommended formats for all practical purposes are: 5" x 3". 5 x 5, 8 x ll, ll x 14", ll x l7, 14 X 14", and l7 X 17". It will be noted in Fig. 3 that the basic form of the present invention readily lends itself to a reduction to 5" x 3". The reduction in this case is made in the north to south direction (Fig. 1 or 2) so as to retain the same caption and lower margin as employed in the basic form. Thus it will be seen that the basic form or card 1G is adapted for use as a library or index card widely accepted in card filling systems.

In the case of extended forms it will be noted that extensions of the card 10 are made in multiples of 3 inches in either direction, the progression from the basic size of 5 inches being 8, l1, 14, 17" and the like as indicated above. For purposes of illustration the consolidated disclosures of Figs. 4 and 5 exemplify an extended foim of 8" x l1" best adapted for letters and the like. In this example a three inch increment is made in the north to south direction and two three inch increments are made in the east to west direction.

The mode of employing the printed caption in extended forms is shown in Fig. 4, and in Fig. 5 the lower margin is illustrated to show the coordination of the indicia circles 13" thereof with the extended form for purposes of binding the latter under the English system of measures. In this connection it will be noted that two of the printed captions CR of the basic card are employed, one printed caption in each upper corner. This leaves an intermediate area of 1 inch between each of the 5 inch caption margins and as seen in Fig. 4, this 1 inch addition in the extended for-m is conducive to accurately coordinating the indicia circles 13" in the united lower margins (Fig. 5) for continuous perforation at the proper Vs spacing to t ring binders under the English system. It should here be noted that each increment of two six inch units includes one basic dirnension (5 inches) plus an addition of 1/s of such basic dimension for purposes of coordinating the indicia circles 13 of the united basic forms.

As hereinbefore explained the printed matter on the basic form 10 is limited to 12.5 centimeters within the 5 inch card. Consequently, in extending the forms under the metric system of measures the same procedure is followed as stated above. Hence, starting with a basic form of 12.5 centimeters width, the increment would include another unit of 12.5 cm. plus an addition of 1/s of such basic dimension or 2.5 centimeters. An extension under the metric system would include two caption margins of 12.5 centimeters each, as shown in Fig. 6, with a 2.5 cm. intermediate area between them. This 2.5 cm. addition to the form is conducive to accurately coordinating thev indicia circles 13" in the united lower margins (Fig. 7) for continuous perforation at the proper (1 cm.) spacing to t ring binders under the metric system.

The basic card 10 and any extension thereof is suitable for binding in the manner as shown in Fig. 8 whether the rings be spaced according to either the English or the metric system of measures. Moreover, by punching out all the indicia circles 13 in the caption margin, the basic cards are adaptable for use in a keysorter system as illustrated in Fig. 9.

Bypunching out U-shaped slots 23 in the lower margin of the card 10, as shown in Fig. 13, the basic cards are adapted for lateral offset spacing on rails 24 spaced according to either the English or the metric systems of measures.

In addition to the foregoing the-basic forms and extensions thereof are adapted for use on a summary board as illustrated in Fig. 14 wherein the pegs 25 may be spaced according to either the English or metric system of measures.

As previously explained, by prepunching the perforation indicia 15 on either side of the basic form or extensions thereof, they are adapted for use as continuous forms as shown in Fig. l2.

These basic forms and extensions thereof are well adapted for reproduction on mircrofilm as is illustrated in Fig. l5. In this connection the punching out of certain indicia circles 13 and/or 13 in variable combinations are conducive to a codification of each card for finding purposes. If desired, a filling in, i. e. darkening or punching out of the squares 11 and/or 11" in the caption margin makes for more numerous code indicia by which the light 'rays of sorting or finding mechanism associated with microfilm are operated to select a particular form being sought.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that I have provided a basic form and extensions thereof having analytical features or subdivisions based upon systems of measures forming indicia for physically adapting such forms for universal application and manipulation withwell known filing, sorting, checking and finding systems.

While I have described a basic form and its extensions in specific detail, it will be apparent that the same is susceptible to variations, modifications and alterations without departure from the spirit of my invention. I therefore desire to avail myself of all variations, modifications and alterations as fairly come within the purview of the appended claims.

What l claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

l. A printed form comprising a card having margins on at least its binding edge and the edge opposingsaid binding edge in one of which margins are marked zones of perforations spaced according to the metric system of measures and in the opposing one of said margins marked zones of perforation spaced according to the English system of measures said card having its marked zones of perforation in one of said margins punched for ring binders at the option of the user leaving the marked zones of perforation at that margin of the card opposite its binding edge for codification of said card.

2. A printed form comprising `a card printed on both its sides to provide a caption margin on either side thereof adjacent opposing edges with respect to each other, codified indicia circles in each of said caption margins, the indicia circles in one of said caption margins including marked zones of perforation spaced from each other according to the metri-c system of measures, and the indicia circles in the other of said caption margins including marke-d zones of perforation spaced from each other according to the English system of measures, the marked zones of perforation in the indicia circles in one of said margins being punched at spacings registerable with ring binders spaced according to one of said systems of measures for binding said card providing indicia circles -in the caption margin on the opposite side of said card for codified filing and marking at the option of the user of said card.

3. A universal form comprising a card having on each side thereof a central area for receiving informational data surrounded by a margin of uniform width at all of its edges, said card having a caption margin on each 7 of its faces, the lcaption margin on one face of 'the card being adjacent'an 'edge fof the card behind a margin on the reverse side thereof which is opposite the edge adjacent the caption margin on the opposite face 'of the card, -a plurality of indicia 'circles printed in each of said 'caption margins for receiving and codifying markings related to the informational data in the central area of said card, the indicia -circles in' one of said 'caption margins including marked zones of perforation spaced according to the metric system of measures and the indicia circles in the caption margin on the opposite side of the card including marked zones cf perforation spaced according to the English system of measures, said card having the marked zones of perforation in one of the margins accurately punched for binding purposes 'according to `either the metric or the English system of measures and the unpunched indicia circles in the caption mar-gin opposite the binding edge 'of saidcard for use in codifying and identifying markings, incident to binding said card.

4. A basic form comprising a card having printed margins adjacent opposing edges thereof, 'a plurality 'of indicia circles in each of said printed margins for receiving check marksv and the like for identifying purposes, the indicia circles in oneof said margins having v'zones of perforation spaced according to vlthe English system of measures and the indicia circles in the other one of said margins having Zones of perforation spaced according to the metric system of measures, for punching the card for binding according to either the metric or English system of measures, leaving a caption margin opposite the binding margin. V

5. A basic form in yaccordance lwith claim 4 in which the iirs't and last indicia circle in cnc 'of said margins merges with laterally extending parallel tangential lines to indicate a U opening to the respective side edges of said card and punched out to provide open ended -rail engaging slots.

6. A basic form comprising a card having printed margins of equal dimension adjacent all 'of its edges, 'a plurality of aligned indicia circles in one of said margins including Zones of perforation according to the English system of measures, a plurality of aligned indicia circles in the opposite one of said margins including zones of perforation spaced according to the metric system of measures and aligned equally spaced perforation indicia in the side margins of said card, the rst and last of said perforation indicia in each of said margins registering with the aligned indicia circles in said one and the opposite one of said margins.

7. A basic form, comprising a card having printed margins of equal dimension adjacent all of its edges, a plurality of aligned indicia circles in one of said margins including Zones of perforation spaced according to the English system of measures, a plurality of aligned indicia circles in the opposite one of said margins including zones of perforation spaced according to the metric system of measures, and aligned equally spaced perforations in each of said side margins of the card, the side margin perforations falling within said margins in which the indicia crcles are spaced according to the English system of measures registering identically with the zone of perforation included in the first and last indicia circles in said one of said margins 'and the perforation indicia falling Within the opposite one of said margins being in alignment with the aligned indicia circles therein, said card having its zones for perforations in one of the other of its margins .punched for ring binding at the option of the user.

8. A basic form comprising a card having printed margins of equal dimension adjacent all of its edges, 'a plurality of aligned indici-a circles in one of s'aid margins including zones of perforation spaced according to the English system of measures, a plurality of aligned indicia circles in the opposite one of said margins including zones of perforation spaced according to the metric system of measures, and aligned equally spaced perforations in each of `said side margins of the card, 'the perforations falling Within said 'one of said margins in which the indicia circles are spaced according 'to the English system of measures registering identically with the outermost indicia circles in said one of said margins and the perforations falling within the opposite one of said margins aligning transversely of said card with 'the ,aligned indicia circles therein and predominating over vthe outermost indicia circles in said opposite one of 4said margins, parallel indicia `arms extending'tangentially from said predominating perforation indicia toward the adjacent outer sidecdges 'of said card 'to provide laterally disposed U-shaped indicia at 'the sides of said card cut out for suspension of said card thereby.

9. A basic form comprising a card of predetermined size having margins on at least its binding `edge and the edge opposing said binding Vedge in which margins are printed indicia circles including zones of perforation having code letters therein, the indicia circles in one of said margins being spaced in accordance with the metric system 'of measures and the indicia circles in the opposing one of said margins being spaced 'according to the English system of measures, land increments of said basic form 'comprising units of increase including another card of said predetermined size in combinati-on with 'an intermediate area one-fthlof said predetermined size for accurately coordinating the Zones of perforation Within the margin on the binding edge of said intermediate area with the spacing of the indicia circles in the remaining portions of said binding edge lon either side of said intermediate area.

l0. In combination with a basic form having opposite margins each provided with a row of printed indicia circles every other letter of the English alphabet, the indicia circles in one of said margins having zones of perforation spaced from each other in units based upon the metric system and the indicia circles in the opposing one of rsaid margins having zones of perforation spaced from each other in units based upon the English system of measures for punching and binding on rings spaced according to one or the other of said 'systems of measure; of extensions thereof comprising at least one jof said basic forms of predetermined dimension in thedirrection of said rows of printed indicia circles, and increments of said basic form including another one of said basic forms and an intermediate area between the lat-ter and the basic form extended, said Vinternlediate, area being one-'fifth the dimension of said predetermined dimension whereby the zones of lperforation in the binding margin on said one of said basic forms continue across said intermediate area for register exactly withthe zones of perforation in the binding margin of the other one of said basic forms included in each increment of said basic form;

ll. A basic form having a binding margin along opposing edges thereof in which a row of indicia circles printed in one of said marginal edges Vincludezones of perforation spaced accordingk to 'the metric system of measures and a row of indicia circles printed in the opposing one of said marginal edges include zones of perforation spaced according to the English system of measures, 'pi'nwheel feed perforations in the side margins of said basic form, said rows of printed indicia circles being spaced from each other in units of measure corresponding lto the spacing of saidfp'inwheel feed perforationsin the side vmargins of said basic ornjilto coordinate with the lzones of perforation inthe outermost indicia circles in each of said rows thereof 'for register with Pinwheel fee'drmeans l for advancement as acontinuousrform, and the eittension of said basic form inthe direction of said rows of printed 'indicia circles, comprising the combination with at least one of said basic forms ofunits offiric'rease each including another one of said basic forms and an intermediate area one-fth the dimension thereof whereby the zones of perforation in the indicia circles in the binding margin of said one of said basic forms continue at the spacing of the printed indicia circles in the binding margin for register accurately with the zones of perforation in the indicia circles in the binding margin of the other one of said basic forms included in said units of increase.

12. A basic form having in one of its marginal edges a row of printed indicia circles each including a zone of perforation and spaced from each other 1 cm. center to center and having in its opposite marginal edge a printed row of indicia circles each including a zone of perforation and spaced from each other of an inch center to center for punching and binding according to the metric or the English system of measures, said basic form being of a predetermined dimension in the direction of said rows of printed indicia circles for the reception of alternate letters of the English alphabet within them,

and extensions of said form in increments based upon an additional form of said predetermined dimension and an intermediate section of one fth of said predetermined dimension punched with perforations spaced correspondingly to said zones of perforation in the rows of indicia circles in the binding margins of the basic forms on either side of said intermediate section.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 999,991 Hargrave Aug. 8, 1911 1,172,010 Cooke Feb. 15, 1916 1,760,417 Lake May 27, 1930 2,221,917 Hageman Nov. 19, 1940 2,313,285 Zalkind Mar. 9, 1943 2,516,899 Metzner Aug. 1, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US999991 *Aug 11, 1910Aug 8, 1911William B HargraveFiling and indexing appliance.
US1172010 *Mar 13, 1915Feb 15, 1916William A Cooke JrLoose-leaf book.
US1760417 *Feb 24, 1927May 27, 1930Tabulating Machine CoDetachable record card
US2221917 *Dec 9, 1938Nov 19, 1940American Sales Book Co IncSelective separation of continuous interleaved record assembly
US2313285 *May 31, 1941Mar 9, 1943Joseph ZalkindSortable multiple form
US2516899 *May 14, 1945Aug 1, 1950Standard Register CoAutographic register
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2985084 *Dec 30, 1958May 23, 1961Compur Werk Friedrich DeckelInterchangeable objective for photographic cameras
US3970397 *Mar 6, 1975Jul 20, 1976Armstrong Terrance RBusiness card system
US4127690 *Jul 5, 1972Nov 28, 1978Meteor-Siegen Apparatbau Paul SchmeckFiling strip
US4241994 *Mar 31, 1978Dec 30, 1980Ryan Le Roy JrVisually descriptive information transmission, storage, and retrieval set
US4334771 *Nov 21, 1980Jun 15, 1982Ryan Jr Leroy JVisually descriptive information transmission, storage, and retrieval set
Classifications
U.S. Classification283/62, 209/547, 312/184, 428/131, 428/194, 40/401, 402/79
International ClassificationB42D5/00, B42D5/02
Cooperative ClassificationB42D5/02
European ClassificationB42D5/02