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Publication numberUS2853707 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1958
Filing dateMay 28, 1954
Priority dateMay 28, 1954
Publication numberUS 2853707 A, US 2853707A, US-A-2853707, US2853707 A, US2853707A
InventorsJuilfs Albert G
Original AssigneeSenco Products
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Staple supporter to enable the piercing of metal
US 2853707 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

STAPLE SUPPORTER T0 ENABLE THE PIERCING OF METAL A. G. JUILFS Sept. 30, 1958 Filed May 28. 1954 o a w 7 R a u \u. L P m w o w A W J w a r 1 A a a 5 -00 7 J n M v w 4 STAPLE SUPPORTER- TO ENABLE THE PIERCING OF METAL Albert G. Juilfs, Newtown, Ohio, assignor to Senco Products, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application May 28, 1954, Serial No. 433,056

4 Claims. (Cl. 1-49) My invention resides in the provision of means by which the legs of a staple may be supported on all sides throughout their full length as the staple is driven into or through a piece of wood, metal or other very hard substance.

In recent years pneumatic tackers and stapling machines have come to be very popular in production line work in many industries. With this great increase in the popularity of these pneumatic tackers has come a corresponding increase in demands for tackers that will perform an even greater number of jobs.

One of the demands most often expressed has been for a tacker or stapling machine that would drive a staple through metal and other hard substances. Such a machine, however, in order to be successful, must not be of unusual weight or cost.

Accordingly, it is an object of my invention to provide a stapling machine which will drive a staple through metal and similar hard substances, which stapling machine is substantially no heavier nor more difficult to use than those popular tackers now on the market but which are presently incapable of driving staples through metal.

It is also an object of my invention to provide a stapling machine of the type described which does not require the use of special, heavy staples nor extra high air pressures.

Another and important object of my invention is to provide means which may easily be made as an-attachment for some of the stapling machines already on the market, such attachment enabling the machine to drive employing the instant invention,

Figure 2 is a front elevation as seen from the left of Figure 1,

Figure 3 is an enlarged section taken on the line 3-3 'of Figure 2,

Figure4-is a view taken from the left of Figure 3 with parts in section and parts broken away,

Figure 5 is a view similar to that of Figure 3 but showing the position of the parts during a different stage in the driving of a staple,

Figure 6 is a view taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 5,

Figure 7 is a view similar to that of Figures 3 and 5 but showing a more advanced stage in the driving of a staple,

Figure 8 is a view taken on the line 88 of Figure 7,

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a pneumatic tacker uited States Patent 0 invention may be accomplished.

Figure 9 is a view similar to that of Figures 3, S and 7 but showing a still more advanced stage in the driving'of a staple, and

Figure 10 is an enlarged perspective view of the principal member of this invention.

My invention is particularly suited for application to stapling machines of the general type shown in Figures 1 and 2. Pneumatic stapling machines to which this in vention might also be applied are shown in my 'Patents 2,585,939; 2,585,940; 2,585,941; Re. 23,756; 2,671,214; and in my copending applications Serial Numbers 345,489 and 346,595.

Referring now to Figures 1 and 2 there is shown a pneumatic tacker comprising av main body portion 20, a handle 21, a staple feed magazine 22 and a nose generally indicated at 23. A swivel assembly 24 connects the tacker with a suitable air supply and the admission of the air into the body of the tacker is controlled by a valve mechanism 25 actuated by a trigger assembly 26.

As shown throughout the figures the nose 23 comprises a base plate 27 having a staple drive track 28 formed therein. This drive track or groove 28 extends through the full length of the base plate 27 and is adapted to just nicely receive a stapledriver 29.

Bolted or otherwise secured to the base plate 27, as indicated at 30 is a top or cover plate 31. The plate 31 is generally U-shaped and receives between the legs of the U a removable plate 32. The plate 32 extends within the body 20 of the tacker where it abuts a spring, not shown, which normally serves to wedge the plate 32 against the inner edge 31a defining the lower edge of the bridge of the U of the member 31.

It will be understood that staples are fed by any suit able means located within the mazagine 22 to a position wherein each successive staple lies within the passageway 28 :and against the removable cover plate 32. Upon actuation of the tacker the end 29a of the driver 29 will contact the crown of a staple 33 and drive it through the passageway 28 into the work to be stapled, the nose 23 being held against such work,

As shown in the figures the base plate 27 is provided with an opening adjacent which the base of the magazine 22 will abut and through which a cover 34 for the magazine will extend to a position flush with the bottom of the drive track 28. The staples 33 straddle a bar 35 and are urged by a spring-urged follower, not shown, to a position within the drive track 28 before the driver 29.

It is to be understood that the various mechanisms so far described do not constitute a critical limitation on this invention. Rather, I have shown a preferred arrangement for the provision of a suitable drive track to receive the staples and the staple driver. Actually the passageway may be provided in other ways. The particular means for urging the driver also do not constitute a limitation on this invention. And, of course, any suitable means 22 for feeding staples into the drive track ahead of the driver may be employed.

The chief feature of this invention resides in providing proper support for the staple legs throughout their full length as the staple is driven. This distinguishes from the known prior art devices wherein attempts have been made to provide stapling devices which would drive a staple through hard materials. These earlier attempts endeavored to support either the crown of the staple or the points thereof at the moment of piecing. None provided means for supporting the staple legs on all sides throughout their full length during the complete driving of the staple. This, however, I have done and have found extremely successful and desirable.

Referring now to Figures 2, 4 and 10, I shall describe a specific means by which the principal object of this I may provide a Patented Sept. 30, 1958 3 U-shaped member 36 having a finger 37 extending outwardly from the center of the bridge of the U. The member 36 overlies the top plate 31 and the finger 37 extends through an opening 38. provided in the upper plate 31.

The member 37'is of sufi'icient width to just nicely be received between the legs of the staples. Also, this member will extend to a position flush with the end of the nose 23.

The finger 37 is so shaped that when the member 36 lies flush against the 'covermember 31 this finger will extend through the opening 38 and the end thereof will not only be fiush with the end of the nose 23 but also it will lieagainst the bottom 28a of-the drive. track 28 as best seen in Figures 3 and 5. In addition there must be provided a proper configuration of the member 37 so that when the crown of the staple is adjacent this finger the forward end thereof will stilllie against the bottom of the drive track28 between the staple legs. This is perhaps best illustrated in Figures 5 and 6.

In Figures 5 and 6 it will be observed that the staple 33 has been moved to a position wherein the points are just short of the end of the nose 23. Since the member or finger 37 does not lie flat against the base 27 or drive track botom 28a throughout its full length, it being particularly pointed out that the end 37a of the member 37 lies against the base 27 while the major length thereof slants in the direction of the member 36 away from the drive track bottom 28a, the staple 33 may be moved to a position wherein its points are flush with the end of the nose 23 without deflecting the finger 37. This is true at least for the particular length staple shown wherein the distance from point to crown is at least as great as the distance from the point 37a to the bend 39 of the finger 37. Shorter staples, however, may be used with the same finger 37 with good results and this will be explained shortly.

In the position of the staple 33 last mentioned the crown of the staple will be right at the bend 39 in the member 37 when the points are at the end of the nose 23. In this manner I insurethat some portion of the finger 37 will in fact lie between the legs of the staple throughout their full length at the instant the points thereof are first driven into the work. Also, this central or lateral support given the staple legs by the finger 37 will be continued during the further driving of the staple into the Work. In this connection it should be pointed out that it is not necessary that the full thickness of the finger 37 lie between the legs of the staple, in order to give them the proper support. Rather, it is necessary only that a portion of the finger 37 extend between the staple legs throughout their full length, that is, throughout substantially the full length of the staple leg portions not yet driven into the work. Thus, considering the width of an individual staple leg as being defined by the arrows applied to the staple shown in Figure 9, it is not necessary that the finger 37 extend throughout this full staple leg width. So long as any portion of the finger 37 lies between the two legs and within the width of the legs as determined by the arrows in Figure 9, such legs will be prevented from collapsing toward one another.

By having the finger 37 slanted with respect to the plane of the staple as driven and by having the actual pivot or hinge point for the finger 37 considerably removed from the portions which must lie between the staple legs, the staple crown may move under the finger 37 almost to the very end of the nose 23 without so moving the finger 37 as to force it and the tip 37a completely from between the staple legs.

As stated, so long as the finger 37, throughout the length of the staple legs not yet driven into the work, lies between these staple legs, even if only for a slight portion of the width of the staple legs, buckling of such legs towards one another will be prevented.

It will be apparent that as the staple is driven into the work it will be necessary for the member 37 to clear in some manner so that the crown of the staple does not get hung up in any way and so that some slant of the plane of the finger 37 with the plane of the staple as driven will be maintained. This I accomplish by providing a channel 40 in the member 31 which has a depth of about twice the thickness of the finger 37. Also, the aperture 38 is sufficiently large to permit a swinging movement of the member 37. The deep portion of the channel 46 must be adjacent this aperture. Thus, as the driver 29 forces the staple 33 out of the nose 23, the crown passing beneath the finger 37, this finger may move upwardly to a position within the channel 40 provided in the upper plate 31. This position is illustrated in Figure 7. A

It is pointed out that the slot or channel 40 could extend clear through the nose piece 31 thus eliminating the portion 3122. This would, however, weaken the structure and is not desirable. From the standpoint of function, however, especially as applied to the principle of maintaining the finger 37 or at least a portion thereof between the staple legs at all times while driven, the important thing is that the channel 40 and orifice 38 be sufiiciently large and deep to permit the finger 3'7 to clear as the staple crown passes thereunder. And, because the finger does slant as stated and because it is desired to keep a portion of the finger and its tip 37a between the legs of the staple in the manner explained, the depth of such channel and orifice must be somewhat more than merely the actual thickness of the finger. If

this were not so the crown would force the finger against an abutment whereupon further movement of the crown would act to straighten out the finger and force it into a plane parallel with that of the staple as driven; this would be disastrous. Obviously, when the finger 37 is forced into a plane parallel with that of the staple as driven, no portion of the finger could extend between the legs and there would be an absence of the support'for the legs which I have found to be so desirable.

In order to enable movement of the finger 37 in the manner just described it is necessary that this finger have its pivot or hinge point considerably removed from the point of first contact of the staple crown with the finger. Were this not so such first contact would almost immediately cause the finger to pivot to a plane parallel with that of the staple as driven thus removing the desired support. In the particular form of the invention herein shown I form the member 36 of a tough resilient metal and secure it to the plate 31 by means 41 located to wards the ends of the legs of the U-shaped member 36 itself. This arrangement provides a flexing movement of the finger 37 when the driver 29 and staple 33 pass therebeneath. It is pointed out that the arrangement of parts is such that normally the member 36 will lie flush against the member 31 and the member 37 will take the position shown in Figure 3.

I have also found, in order to insure that the end 37a of the finger 37 will lie between the staple legs at the instant the staple is driven into the work, and so that some portion of the finger 37 will-also remain between the legs for substantially the full distance the staple is driven, that making the finger 37, between the bend 39 and the tip 37a, normally define an angle with respect to the plane of the staple as driven, is most important. As stated, it is desired to maintain this angular relationship during the entire driving of the staple. This insures full support of the staple legs at all times. Further insurance of this relationship may be obtained by arranging the member 37 and the finger 36 so that when the member 36 is fastened to the plate 31 by the means 41 the tip 37a of the finger 37 will bear against the bottom '28:: of the passageway 28 formed in the base member 27.

The slight resiliency of the member 36, the securing of the member 36 as at 41, this being remotefrom the finger 37, the size of the aperture 38 and the clearance provided by the channel 40 make it possible for the finger 37 to clear so as to permit the crown of the staple 33 and the staple driver 29 to pass thereunder as the staple is driven completely into the work, and at the same time maintain at least a portion of the thickness of the finger 37 between the legs of the staple.

It is important that the plane of the finger.37 extend diagonally through the plane of the staple as driven, that considerable clearance be provided adjacent the finger 37 where it will first be contacted by the staple crown, and that the true pivot point for this finger be located considerably removed from this point of first contact of the crown with the finger. Such arrangement insures a maximum angle of the finger with respect to the plane of the staple as driven. Such an angle is necessary in order for some portion of the finger 37 to remain between the staple legs up to the moment the last portion of the staple is driven into the work. Obviously, the steeper the angle the greater will be the chance of keeping some portion of the finger 37 between the staple legs up to the final moment. On the other hand, however, if the angle is too great then initially there would be no support for those portions of the staple legs which are adjacent the crown and this is undesirable. As emphasized throughout the specifications, there must be some support throughout the full length of the staple legs and not just at the points or crown.

The relationships just discussed are perhaps best brought out in Figure 9 wherein the staple is shown as almost driven completely from the nose 23 by the driver 29. Even at this stage in the driving of the staple 33, however, it will be observed that the corner 37b of the finger 37 still lies between the staple legs within the width thereof as defined by the arrows in this figure. The interposition of this corner between the staple legs is sufiicient to keep them from buckling towards one another. In addition it must be remembered that by this time the major portions of the legs are embedded in the work and initial piercing has been accomplished.

It is contemplated that this invention may be applied to staples of varying lengths. The instant illustration employs a staple 33 in which the distance between the points and crown is substantially the same as the distance between the tip 37a of the finger and the bend 39 imparted therein. A shorter staple, however, could be employed with this same finger. Although it is true that the staple crown would strike the finger 37 before the points reached the work, because of the angular relationship above explained in detail portions of the finger 37 would still lie between the staple legs. Thus, such support would extend from the corner 37b to the point of contact of the crown with the finger 37. Thus the legs would still be supported substantially throughout their full length as the staple is driven. To repeat by way of emphasis in this connection, it is not necessary that each staple leg 33 be supported throughout its full width as defined by the arrows shown in Figure 9. Rather, it is of primary importance only that the support extend between the staple legs within the region of these arrows. However slight this penetration may be it will be sufficient, due to the inherent strength of the staple wire, to prevent collapse of the legs towards one another. Such inherent strength is sufiicient to prevent the individual staple leg from folding about the corner 37b of the finger 37.

Referring particularly to Figures 3, 4, 5 and 7 my invention operates as follows. A staple 33 is moved against the closure plate 32 to a position before the end 29a of the staple driver 29 and within the drive track 28 provided in the base plate 27. The particular means of so positioning the staple does not constitute a part of this invention. Also the exact arrangement of the base plate, cover plate and drive track does not constitute a limitation. Any means for positioning a staple within a drive track in which a staple driver operates will sufiice, subject only to the limitations emphasized below.

In this form of my invention the nose of the tacker must be so configured that a member 36 may be fastened to the outside thereof and so that the finger 37 may extend through a suitable aperture to a position wherein the tip 37a lies flush with the bottom of the staple drive track 28. This drive track must be of a size to just nicely receive the staple. The finger 37 must be of a size, and must be positioned with respect to the drive track, to just nicely fit between the legs of the staple as moved in the drive track.

Also, in my invention the nose must be provided with a second channel or similar clearance of a width to just nicely receive only the member 37 and of a depth at least about twice the thickness of the finger 37. This not only makes it possible for the member 37 to clear so as to permit the crown of the staple 33 and the staple driver 29 to pass thereunder, but it also insures that the point of the staple is supported on all sides at the moment it mus-t pierce the work and that the legs are similarly supported throughout the driving of the staple. The channel should not be so wide as to permit the staple to go into the channel also for this would eliminate support for the legs on the side opposite the bottom of the drive track.

After the staple 33 has been initially positioned within the drive track 28, the staple driver is actuated in some manner, which manner does not constitute a limitation of this invention. As the driver 29 moves within the drive track 28 the end 29a of the driver will contact the crown of the staple, break it from the staple strip and force it from the end of the nose. As the staple approaches the end of the nose 23 as seen in Figures 5 and 6, the finger 37 will remain between the legs of the staple, slanting from a deep penetration of the tip 37a within the widths of the staple legs to a lesser degree adjacent the crown. This is insured by the angle defined by that portion of the finger 37 extending between the point 39 and the tip 37a and the plane of the staple as driven. Further movement of the staple 33 by the driver 29 will bring the points of the staple in contact with the Work. At this instant the staple is supported about all sides of its pointed legs. This support is provided by the plate 27, the finger 37 and the member 31. The slot 40, which is formed in the member 31, is wide enough only to receive the member 37, thus insuring complete support of the staple legs in the manner described.

As the staple 33 is then driven through the work in the manner shown in Figure 7, the member 37 is pushed within the channel 40 so that the crown of the staple and the driver 29 may pass therebeneath. The forward part of the finger 37, however, will still be between the staple legs even when the crown contacts the rear part of this finger. This is insured by the angle the finger makes with the plane of the staple as driven. Even as the crown approaches the tip 37a the lower corners 37b thereof will lie between the legs, see Figure 9. Upon completion of the setting of the staple and return of the driver 29 to the position indicated in Figure 3, the member 36 and finger 37 will, due to their resilient construction and pivoted mounting as at 41, again take the position indicated in Figures 3 and 5.

It will be understood that certain modifications may be made in my invention without departing from the scope and spirit thereof. It will also be understood that while I have shown my invention as embodied in certain specific structures, I do not intend to be limited by such structures except insofar as they are specifically set forth in the subjoined claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and what I desire to protect by United States Letters Patent is:

1. In a stapling device comprising nose structure defining astaple drive track having a bottom along which staples are moved, a staple driver, means to actuate said driver, and means to position a staple in said track to be driven by said driver, the improvement which comprises: a staple supporter comprising a finger to extend between the legs of the staple to be driven, said finger extending from a position substantially flush with the staple discharge end of the nose structure and with the drive track bottom rearwardly a distance at least as great as the length of the staple to be driven and away from the track bottom by an amount about equal to the width of a staple leg, means pivotally mounting said supporter to said device, and said nose structure defining a clearance for said finger only, said clearance being located opposite said track bottom.

2. A staple supporter for stapling devices of the type comprising a nose piece defining a staple drive track having a bottom along which staples are moved, a staple driver, means to move said driver in said track, and means to position a staple in said track in the path of said driver, said staple supporter comprising: a flat finger of a width substantially equal to the distance between the legs of the staple; said finger normally being in a plane angularly disposed with respect to the plane of the staple as driven, the forward end of said finger abutting the bottom of said drive track adjacent the forward end of said nose piece, said finger extending rearwardly towards the crown of said staple; means to pivotally mount said finger on said stapling device at a place relatively remote from the place at which said crown first contacts said finger when moved forwardly by said staple driver; and said nose piece defining a clearance for said finger only into which said clearance said finger may move without obstruction as the crown of the staple and the staple driver pass beneath said finger, said clearance being located opposite said track bottom; said finger being at least as long as the said staple to 'be driven; whereby a portion of the supporter lies between the staple legs throughout substantially the full length thereof during such time as the staple remains in the stapling device.

3. In a stapling device comprising nose structure defining a staple drive track having a bottom along which staples are moved, a staple driver, means to actuate said driver, and means to position a staple in said track to be driven from said device by said driver, the improvement which comprises: a staple supporter comprising a flat finger substantially as wide as the'distance between the legs of the staple to be driven and substantially as thick as the width of a staple leg and at least as long as the staple legs, said track being substantially only as deep as the width of a staple leg, said supporter extending from a position adjacent the forward end of the device and flush with the drive track bottom rearwardly towards the crown of the staple to be driven and away from said track bottom by an amount about equal to the width of a staple leg,

said nose structure defining a clearance opposite said track bottom and wide enough to receive said supporter only, said clearance being greater than the thickness of said finger, whereby upon movementof said staple insaid track'to' a position wherein the points of the staple legs are flush with the forward end of the device said supporter will extend between the staple legs throughout their full length, andmeans to pivot said supporter in said device at a place relatively remote from the place at which the staple crown will engage. the supporter upon further movement of the staple, whereby a portion of said supporter will remain between the staple legs throughout substantially the full length thereof within the device during complete driving of the staple into work.

4. In a stapling machine having a nose member defining a staple drive track having a bottom along which} staples are moved and having means to feed a succession of staples into said drive track and having a staple driver movable in said drive track to drive a staple through said nose member into work to be stapled; the improvement which comprises a support member flexibly mounted on theoutside of said nose member, a finger on said support member, said finger being substantially of the same width as the distance between the legs of a staple, said nose member having an aperture to receive said finger, said finger extending through said aperture to a position in which at least the forward end of said finger normally abuts the bottom of said drive track flush with the forward end of said nose member, said nose member defining a channel opposite said track bottom and of such size to receive said finger only, and said finger normally slanting back from its forward end to a bend therein, the distance between said forward end and said bend being about the same as the length of the staple legs, and said bend being spaced from the bottom of said drive track a distance slightly less than the thickness of the staple crown, whereby said finger may be moved out of said drive track into said channel when said staple driver drives a staple through said nose member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,962,874 Polzer June 12, 1934 2,117,741 Polzer May 17, 1938 2,117,743 Polzer May 17, 1938 2,185,751 Peterson et al Jan. 2, 1940 2,216,453 Paulin Oct. 1, 1940 2,226,598 Wright Dec. 31, 1940 2,531,985 Naismith Nov. 28, 1950 2,585,939 Julifs Feb. 19, 1952 2,627,601 Vandervieren Feb. 10, 1953 2,635,234 Reed Apr. 21, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1962874 *Dec 10, 1931Jun 12, 1934Hotchkiss Co E HStaple setting machine
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US2117743 *May 18, 1935May 17, 1938Hotchkiss Co E HStaple driving machine
US2185751 *Oct 17, 1938Jan 2, 1940Hotchkiss Co E HMachine for stapling diversified work
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US2585939 *Aug 23, 1950Feb 19, 1952Senco ProductsStaple driving means for portable pneumatic staplers
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3038161 *Mar 9, 1960Jun 12, 1962Bocjl CorpPneumatic fastener driving and like tool
US3348752 *Jul 26, 1965Oct 24, 1967Dunham White And Company LtdStaple magazines
US3516590 *Sep 26, 1967Jun 23, 1970Verpa Draad Ind NvFastener applying implement
US5014897 *Nov 20, 1989May 14, 1991Briggs & Stratton CorporationStaple gun driver guide assembly
US6076720 *Jul 22, 1998Jun 20, 2000Deng; Jinn-YiStapler with staples of different sizes
US6237827 *Nov 12, 1998May 29, 2001Senco Products, Inc.Stapler and method for the attachment of steel framing
US6279808 *Jul 27, 1999Aug 28, 2001Mark E. LarsenNail guide mechanism for a nail gun
US8091752 *Aug 18, 2008Jan 10, 2012Rexon Industrial Corp., Ltd.Nail gun with a nail guiding unit
USRE39567 *Oct 20, 2004Apr 17, 2007Stanley Fastening Systems, L.P.Nail guide mechanism for a nail gun
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/123, 227/139, 227/130
International ClassificationB25C5/00, B25C5/06
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/06
European ClassificationB25C5/06